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Abilene Reporter News: Monday, June 10, 1974 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - June 10, 1974, Abilene, Texas                                "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR F.OES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT 93HD 358 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, MONDAY EVENING, 10, PAGES IN FOUR SECTIONS _ _ _ _ Aaociattd Preu BY BLUE RliCKER White Fire trucks Date Back to Race 'Fort 'iiave' -while flre.eigints instead of red enes like the restof us? A. Years ago the Fart M'orth. volunteer fire department entered a pumper race wilh Pallas arid other.surrounding'towns to sec wtp. could hook up-to a fireplug and pump yater .'.to 'a certain point in the shortest length of time. Fort- firemen wanted their fire trucksito look real-pretty for the competi- tion'but'the city fathers didn't sec-fit to furnish :the project. So, .the fire chief .decided .tp.buy it himself. He went to a paint store only to. find It was all out of fire erigine'-red paint. He bought white instead. To fancy things up a bit, the white trucks were primmed with gpld.leaf and the result was so eye-catching'more white -paint was ordered and all the fire wagons were paint while." f The fire chief had some huge white .horses which he sold to'the city to pull the fire wagons and whenever the fire alarm sound ed, all the people to watch the beautiful while fire trucks pulled by white horses. For years, an artist and friend of the firemen lived in the basement of the central fire station, earning his keep pounding out gold and putting the gold leaf on the trucks He died about two years ago. Now the Fort Worth fire trucks use gold decals instead of hand-painted gold-leaf striping, Firemen claim :ihe white trucks are safer visible at .Lt. John says' the r'eaT reason -they've stayed with the white trucks is they're pvet ly and they're different. Q. If President Nixon should resign 'or be wanW he still he eligible for his Presidential pension? A. He probably would since his pension is actually a retirement fund to which he's contributed 7 per cent of his in all his years former presi dent, he's entitled to a year, free mailing privileges, free office space .and up to for office help. Because he''was" a U.S. "President, he .would continue to receive.much mail wheth- er retired; impca.qhed, thus Con long ago made provisions to'he'lp allc viate some-of this expense. If impeached, -Iried and convicted it is possible his federal benefits could be re .'depending on whether criminal charges are aniHhe' verdict. Gen eral MacArthur was fired but he still drew his retirement pay. Q. Is Jerry Reed' Chel Atkins' A Apparently, not. Heed's wife is the for rher PrisciUa-f Mitchell. Reed and Atkins have made an album .together, "Me and .Atkins produced rec'qrds for Heed and they wort together often but apparently the music industry is their Eo'says' the reliable refer- ence staff at the city library. Q. There's supposed to be a welding course somewhere in town, I Ihlnk at Abilene High, but I can't find anybody there that kiaws about It. A. Bet you're thinking about the adult education classes usually held at Abilene High There isn't one going right now but been talk about starting up a welding'class. The course is extremely expensive whal with cost of metal, welding rods and sup- plies nec.cssary. Don Hale, who's in charge of the Adult Ed courses, is afraid the tuition .would have to be so high he wouldn't get any class members. There's one possibility though, if Hale can 'find 8 or 10 people who need this course in connection with their occupation, he might be able to get some slate funding which would lower tuition-lo a more respectable Call Hale at 673-6585 if you fit (he qualifications. If he's able to get the class logether, it will be sometime next Septem- ber. Address questions to Action Line, Box AbOene, Texis 7SM. Names will not be iscd but questions must he signed and addresses glvei. Please include tel- ephone Minbers If possible.. Quitting Firemen .Cite Low Pay -Three Abilene firemen hove .quit, their jobs with the city, in the past few weeks, citing fow pay as the reason. The nien say they are not bitter toward the city but would like to see a healthy raise for firemen in .the upcoming year's budget-Story Pg< l-B. 5B Business Mirror 3A Classified X-8C Comics 78 .........i...... -4A Horoscope -..........i. 4B Hospital Palienls 2B Obituaries 2 A Sporls............. 1-3C Jy Your Gcod Hcollh BA TV Loq.................SB TV Scout............. 5B .Women's .News.......... 3B Popular Frog Joey 4, of Warren, Mich, found a rare albino frog in a pond near his home two days ago. His mother called the Michigan .to get morci information and now Dr George Nace, a professor', is trying to convince Joey to donate Ins pet foi (AP Wireplioto) Nixon President'Nixon refused'again today lo more House impcjchiiienl inquiry subpoenas, -writing to Ilpiisc Judiciary Committee Chair- man Peter.-.W.-.Hodino Jr.- thai he will do iiothing w h i'Vh would "render Ihe executive branch' henceforth and fprev- crmore subservient to tlie.leg- islative branch. Nixon's- -six-page .--letter 'to Rodino was m lesponse to In? Judiciary .Committee's subpoe- na for tapes of 45 conversa- tions related to the Watergate scandal. The letter' was re- leased by the While House, The committee on. May 29 to subpoena the tapes, even though Nixon had already refused- to comply with an earlier subpoena from Ihc committee and had said he would reject any, further sub- poenas for material related to Watergate. Nixon declared again .tPday lhat "Ihe voluminous body .of materials that the committee already has does give the full story of Waie'rgale insofar as it relates lo presidential knowledge and presidential Refused Again r i decisions" sJid (he insli-. lution of an impeachment in- quuy' against the Presdcnt pei nutted to override all 'restraints of separation of power's, this spell the end of the doctrine of separa lion of would be dn open mvilationtto future Con gi esses to use an impeach mcnt inquiry, however frivo- lously ai a to assert then own over the executive, and lo'ieduce exec utive confidentiality to a null ty." Also lodaj, U S Dislncl Judge John JJ was to begin hearing' pf foi- seven' men 'accused iri the cover-up case, in-: ctudiny motions Tor a change of venue. One of Hie seven is former AVhitc-.Hou.se aide Charles W.'CoIsoii, who plead- ed guilty last .week to obstvuc- lioh of juslice jn the burglary of Daniel Ellsberg's lisychia- trist's And Ihe Supreme: Court. cpuld decide today whether In''' jury report that names Nixon an umndicl- ed. cocons'pirator in connection with the cover-up. -i IB still another f e d e i a 1 U S Distnct Judge Gerhard'Gesell was expected (o decide lo this, uecK, possi bly today what to 'Njxon's le'usaf to jlloiv John D hhrlichman and his law yers total-access lo ceilani White House Ihc plumbers casp, The Judlcuiy Coninutlee subpoena is Ihc foui'lh the conimillee .lias sent Nixon. It got edited transcripts inilcacl of. tapes in first one, -and nothing for Ihe 'next for more tapes and sonie While House logs By KENNETH ;J.- FREED Associated'Press. Writer WASHINGTON. President Nixon flew off'today on the first leg'6f a joiirney that will'lake him lojiye Mid- dle East nations during the next "week. Nixon lefl the United Slates" with Ihe hvin -goals of strengthening the new U.S: role in the Middle 'East and convincing Ihe'Arnerican' peo-- pie that'world, peace his continuation in office. After a brief farewell cere- mony at'the While House, Nix- on departed- from nearby An- drews :Air Force Base at a.iii, EDT', Before leaving :the .White- H s his trip would "reaffirni suppoii for Ihe initiatives' that have been, undertaken" toward a lasting peace :in -the Middle East.-- x Citing his-preyious'Joiirneys to the Soviet Union.'-Nixpn'said; "We believe Ihis trip, other journeys wei taken, will contribute lasting peace to which'AVe'as-Arne'ri- cans are so deeply Vice President Gerald R." Ford' arid'lhe ambassadors of Die haUdns'Nixon wilrbe visil- 'the' Whiter House V6epartUTe? pere- Also walching the "eerchiony and 'waving-goodbye to. Nixon of the CPrmiiiUee for Fairness. loathe'Presidency, a group which! has tried, to Iwl- sler.Nixpn's support amid his Watergate troubles! Nixon, said his trip "will take iis of t, -that has nolhjngSbUt' :-war pyef-4he; past .30 TnTai) ,'-''.We.-realize that one tripMs not 'going to "solve differences'- lhat are.very deep, which back.hia'iiy.years and in some we also a-beginning has .to be said. beginning has bceji toward a different relation and', a better the Mid-'- have-been proud lo play 'a.'pai-tfinrtfiat.beginning; Israel and Kgypt and later be- .tween.'Israe] and'. on i. Weather predicted -nigh'i" .dream Tew-days' Energy Crisis Said Still Building Bj B AP (Mi-Writer' i HOUSTON' (AP) The 'pre- "sident. .of: Ihe rl.OOfl-member Independent Petroleum Asso- ciation of America said today Ihe nation's -energy crisis is slill buildipg.-day by day. John of, Ailcgari, Mich., said the continued trend results from policy stale- ...mate, great -uncor-- 'tainty, political gamemanship being'..' played out.in Washington over energy' matters." Miller s people .must' understand there is only one hope ing an eventual cataclysmic energy famine. That hope is in bunging about a pQlilical-and'.ecqrinniic climate that uill permit our historic free to work lo bring forth .massive capitdl investment. Innovative research, tcclmblogica! -appli- ..caliori .lhat is just, theory .In- day, iand resource develop- ment- .on an'. iihp.recedentcd scale vyilh cnviroiiinenlal sale- guards he said.'. Miller participated'.in; a'pan- el discussion on industry prqb- lenis at the 2Slh'annual meel- ing'of the Texas' Independent Producers i Royalty O'wiicrs' Asspcialion. UK jsaiS''the" costly and es- sential things' for ending the energy'crisis not be done- by political hocus-pocus or chicanery by, Ihe advocates of .federal price controls, stultify- ing regulation, punitive tax- actions, or federal oil compa- nies." He predicted the energy cwr sis ;will end pi'if government will'gel off the back of this industry, and permit Ihe" dy- namic forces and disciplines of a free 'market- lo balance supplies with demands to allo- cate, our. precious energy re- sources (o Ihcjr best and most efficient uses." Miller added', however, that .Ihe petroleum 'industry cur- rently is the battleground of many political ideologies com- mitted to destroying Ameri- ca's free enterprise system. lights '..-and.-'-gradually warmer afternpdns are'-forecasl Craw-; r.. front into the'weekend V is: noiv air f'owri from" Ihc northern pdrtidn of Ihe country.; THE. far the er conditions should stabilize Crawford 'beconie gradually warmer. A High' pressure system, riow' iii! circulates -air-In a clockwise direction, "Crawfora explained, and so creates a.pat- tern, which-brings cool-air from, the north central .states into the Abilene area. The approaching, front-is not the area bW fore the weekend, he added. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMEUCE NiHOMI (Weotlwr Map. P9. 3B1'. ABILENE AND VICINITY. Fair to porlly cldudv''wilh aHcmoans end mlfd nTghts Ligbl'and variable winds btcom- ing aoulheasterly 7 lo 15 on Tuesday.1 High In tre mid B05. 1 ow in Ihs Ks< High-Tuesday In IKe low H'lgh ond low lor 24 hours endlro f o.m.; BA and SJ. High and low Mire dafe last year: U ondM. Sunrise loday: sunset tonlghl: sunrise tomorrow: Nature of Mental Illness Lends Itself to Controversy Commitment Forms Explained Kathy Lasyone, secretary to llie Taylor Coimty Dislrict'Attorney's explains lo a proposed patient's relative the many forms required in the mental commit- ment procedure. Such proceedings -must first he approved.by, an assistant District attorney. (Staff Photo by Don Blakley) A r< By JOE DAC.Y II Repprler-News Staff Writer The central controversy smv 'rounding the involuntary com- ;milmenl of persons' to mental .Institutions is the nature.of the illness itself and that the deci- 'sion to commit a proposed pa- ;tiont is a subjective one. The, diagnosis on Ihe per-- son's'mental health is-, made solely, on Ihe basis of the of the certifying doc- tor .'and on the current definition of mental -illness. Menial .illness, is a signifi- cant deviation of behavior considered at.lhe time, by rec- ognized authorities lo be be- ypnd the broad limits of what we call said Abilene psychiatrist Dr. Carey Cook, one; of'the men who. is often called upon by the county judge (o make such a deci- sion. r THE'PROBLEM boils down Ihe'fact that if qualified 'doctors say a patient is men- ially ill, then practical purposes, he is, Cook said. Unfortunately, Cook added, llierc is no way lo tcsl or lo document a" specific mental illness, as diseases, such as Second of rive stories cholera or measles, are tester! and documented. As such an illness, it is Ihc. only sickness" for which "if you as an atliill do not wish lo be treated, you may be treat- ed involuntarily without your Dr. Cook said. The patient, Cook explained, may be unaware lhat he is in need of treatment, or of the consequences lhat might arise should he not receive treat- ment. Because Ihe illness affects Ihc judgmental processes of the mind, the sickness is thai others'must make that determination', and in some cases, civil, legal proceedings result. ADDITIONAL problem wilh the subjectively of mental illness is thai, once defined, those definitions may change.- For instance in ref- erendum mailed lo about half Ihe members ol Ihe member American Psychiat- ric Assn., more than 5S per cent n( those participating vot- ed lo classify homosexuality as-an alternative form of be- havior ralher than as'a men- ial illness. Such classifications, and a brief definition of explanation of Ihe various mental illness- es, are listed by that associa- lion in ils Diagnosis-and Sla-' listica.l-Manual. One other puts liorial pressure on the doctors who musl decide whelher a proposed palienl is in need of treatment: the fact lhat a men- tal illness gets worse as time progresses. Cook said that in making their evaluation, the two ex- amining physicians must tread Ihe line between expediency and caution. If the-patient is.in rieed o( treatment, he should begin re- ceiviiig. it as..soon "as: ppssibje- before his condition' .deterip-' i not, he should. be released -all" haste, iCobk saitlt i f HK J U D E NT. S, sometimes eas'y, sprnetiiiies' difficult, and sometimes im-'- possible, Cook said.. He added, however, that if there is. any significant doabt, he usually decides in favor of treatment See Commitment, PS. HA, Col. 1   

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