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Abilene Reporter News: Wednesday, May 29, 1974 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - May 29, 1974, Abilene, Texas                                "WITHOUT OR WITH QFFENSE TO'FRIENDS OR; YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT 93jtD YEAR', NO.'. 346 PHONE 6734271- ABILENE, WEDNESDAY EVENING, :MAY 29, PAGES IN FOUR-SECTIONS Associated Pfeif (fl By EUJE RUCKER Rebuilt Motorcycle Snagged on Title Q. A friend of mine bought a "dirt" or "trail motorcycle and converted It into one. Now. he's haying trouble getting II licensed. It's been owned by a number' of different people and tie deal- er who originally'sold it Is out of busi- ness. How can he certificate of title so he' can', license It for use on thev street? II ain't easy..Apparently a rebuilt vehicle. If he bought 'pieces of! dif- ferent vehicles, he'll need'a certified bill of sale (signed-by the "seller-before a Notary part of the vehicle.he's built. in: other words, if he bought a chassis from.: one a motor.from another, he's got'to .have a certified bill of sale on each one: Once'- he all the evidence togethery-lell him; to see. Vevliri Schirader at the lax office in the county courthouse. If there's a way in ihe world, it can be li- censed, Schrader knows how to dp it. The reason for all these restrictions is that a few dishonest people have been stealing motorbikes; dismantling them, going off somewhere and pulling.them back together, thinking -they can fool somebody into think- ing it's a new bike and gel it licensed. Q. Has Rock Hudson ever, been mar- ried? A. Yes, once to.Phyllis-Gates, an agent's secretary 1955. (alias Rock) had bragged in his younger days that he wouldnll marry until he was 30 years old. When he was 29 years and 357 days old, he married Miss Gates. They divorced three years later. Q. In the1 Interests of saving fuel and conserving energy. If the city could synchronze tbe lights on Grape Street. Al 35 and even 25, I hit three, of Ibe five lights on red. Stopping and starting Is one of the greatek nses of fuel the automobile makes. Once the pislons are moving, the tar' gives off less waste. A. True, and your traffic engineer is genu- inely concerned about conserving gasoline. Those lights ;on Grape are supposed to he synchronized but must be spol-qhecked peri- odically. The traffic engineer will send somebody, out to check them over and get them back in synch: Q. Send me a pamphlet or something, would yon? I want to know if it's legal to play; catch in the street. Somebody told me it wasn't okay. A. Wellj it's.complicatcd. Technically, it's probably all right since ordinances don't prohibit it, but slate traffic laws say street's arc designed for vehicular traffic, not for recreation. You know, you could be a traffic hazard. But more important, you could be endangering yourself and that is the best reason not to do it. And that's why the city spends many dollars to build and maintain city parks. The city isn't going to file on you if some- body complains but if you cause an accident you could be susceptible to civil liability. Q. We are two women, age 21, who would like to -find someone lo (each us how to swim after 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. We called the YMCA but their lessons are In the mornings. A. Now if you'd sent us a .picture wo might have found a big, strong, good-looking repoder who could double as a.swimming insl'ructor. But.. .you didn't, so call the Y again. They have an instructed coed swim, 12 lessons, Monday nights at 7 for adiills. There's one class going on, another sched- uled for June 3. .....Address questions lo Action Line, Box JO, Abilene, Texas Names will he used but questions mnst be signed and addresses given. Please Include tel- ephone numbers If possible. Health Concept Support Lacking Three Abilene health of-, ficials are not enthusiastic about the new Health Main- tenance 'Organization con- cept, a new proposal for wide-ranging healrh care in- surance. They tell why on NEWS INDEX Amustmenls 88 Dridgc 9C Business Mirror 3C Clossified 5-9D' Editoriols Horoscope............. 4C Hospitol Potitnts 3A Obituaries......... Sports'.'. 9-1OD To Your Good Health 5C TV Loo................. 8B TV Scout -88 Women's News 2-3B Reach Agreement By; BARRY. SCHWEID Associated Writer; Israel Synaj to separate the after Sec- Kis- singer; won-a major. Israeli concession on Palestinian guerrilla the announcement the' disengagement, made simulta- neously in Washington, Jeru- salem DamascBs, came on, the ,32nd; day ,'6f; Kissinger's current Sourcesjsaid'Israelrofiginal- Misted 'that Syria commilt 'restrain the ii Syrians to do tJiLsr.Tnie Is- settle foFa letter.in which the United St.ates-expressed (Is un- to .why Israel would react forcibly to lerror- ,isf President'.'-Ntion j said in ".what: was a per- manent has now .been removed." He said-prospects for a-pei'- miherit.Middle East peace now are 'better than Ihey have been at any time over the past-25 ..Israeli arid Syrian com- manders will sign the pact in Geneva on Friday, and the fighting, now in its 79th duy, is to stop-and prisoners on both sides freed at lhat.time. At: the United Nations in New York, a 'U.K.spokesman said flie.United Stales had in- formed rthc world body that Israel and Syria had agreed to disengage, their forces on the Golan Heights front. The spokesman said if vc- ciuesled the United -'Nations could shitl troops from tlie U.N.'Emergency Force stand- ing between Egyptian and Is- raeli troops'in'Sinai to man a butter zone between the Syri- ans and Israelis on the Golan Heights. Unofficial Israeli informants said troops would set up the buffer and ;that it would be one to four miles wide. They said it would stretch from iilt. Her.mon- along'the i Golan. Heights, eluding the abandoned Golan capital of Quneitia and a strip 300 yards west of the wrecked town. They said on each side of the buffer the armies would be' reduced in two corridors, each six miles wide.; ;In" the front line corridor, troops would be limited to with, 75 tanks and 36 shrol-rarige canons. In" the deeper zone, each side would be restricted to 450 tanks, with ar- tillery or antiaircraft'missilcs, Ihey said Despite (he lack.oOofficial) confirmation, newsmen, invited to Mi's. Meir's office t'b dl'ink a toast 'with Kissinger. "It's all wrapped saJd one source close to' Kissinger's; negotiations. "It only needs the "cabinet lo 'ratify, it and that is a Israel's state .radio said the disengagement pact would he signed by Israeli and Syrian delegates in Geneva at the end of this week. Mrs. Meir's cabinet met ear- ly this morning to discuss 1 he- Jury Findj WEATHER .Trial Story Pg. g-C, A '42nd District Coiiil 'jury deliberated only -eight minutes Wednesday afternoon before convicting Ronald Glen'Car- of 609 S. Leggctl, of murder in the Nov. 3 shooting death.'of Mrs: Faye'Jolley Teague, 33, of 425 S.'Leggett. The jury was to retiim at 2 p.m: to determine' whether Carson acted -with malice and to set his punishment. U.S. OEF HUTMENT OF COMMERCE Nominal WtoIMr Service [Wnther Mop. Pg. 1M ABILEhJE AMD! VICINITY ,rodius> Mostly Fair, and tirrt today throuqli 1 Thursday. Southerly soulhweslerly .winds 10 Jo 25 mptl. High iorfav 2nd Thursday neor 100. tunight in the lower -70s. Wind wornTngs ore in effecl fin orea lakes: TEMPERATURES TiHtdtf p.m. Wednwdiy 91 fO 2LM 7? 77 7s 73 -V. "72- 71 .It 91 17 .-.V..-f... It J. 8S 81 90 High and low far 24 houn ending 9 a m.: 98 end 71. Mlqn ond Icvr same dale last Id and 51. Sunrise -today: sunset lonign.l: sunrise Boromeler reading at naoir. in. Humidity at noon: 44 per cent. Hot Wind to Blow Readings Near TOO Record Float A hpl'sir balip'on rnanhediby Swiss aeronauts Kurt Riienzi and Ernst Amrnah passes .closes in central Switzerland of ,000 feel the first Alpine 'crossing.by such a craft. The two. pilots took off last week" from Mollis in northeastern Switzerland and came down three and one hours later at fllesocco, some 61 miles away on the southern Alpine slopes. The aeronauts claimed a hot air altitude record of. feet. (AP Wirephoto) N. Ireland 15-Day Strike Suspended By KD BLANCHE Associated Press Writer BELFAST, Northern Ireland (AP) The Protestant'.ex- tremist Ulster Workers' Coun- cil today suspended the 15- day-old strike that paralyzed .Northern Ireland's economy and brought down the British province's government. Jim Smyth, spokesman for the council, said strikers were being told lo return to work because "we don't feel there is any point in prolonging thfe. hardship." But he led open Ihe possibil- ity that unless their demands were met (he'strike, will begin again. It-has been suspended, not called off completely, he said. Smyth said there would be a phased -return to work, and thai heavyjindusrry could not .resume until Monday because sufficient power would not be available until then. However, .Ihe council sent some utility workers back to work today. In London, Britain's admin- istrator for Northern Ireland, Merlyn said Britain will negotiate '.only with elected representatives and not with the strike leaders: ''I shall give no concessions or negotiations to people at- tempting to change the politi- 15 City Students Post Perfect Marks cat situation in this way. That is firm, and I have the firm' support of my colleagues on he said. Rees said a "short-term solution" to the constitutional crisis would be for civil ser- vants to run'. Ih'e provincial government, but eventually power sharing by Protestants and Catholics would be "the only way out of the Northern Ireland problem." He spoke as prime Minister Harold Wilson prepared to meel- with' his cabinet to. dis- cuss .ways to solve the crisis in Northern Ireland, prompted by the'resignalion Tuesday of Protestant members of Chief Minister Brian Faulkne-r's Ex- ecutive, the provincial govern- .Strike leaders wanted an .end lo Northern Iceland's first attempt at sharing power be- tween its -Protestant majority and its Ronian Catholic minor- ity. They got it, at least tem- porarily. Catholic members of the Ex- ecutive refused to resign, but a British government state- ment said the provincial ad- ministration could not function without Protestants. In London, political sources said Prime Minister Harold M'ilson was desperately anx- ious that power-sharing should continue in the embattled province. Wilson called a meeting of senior ministers to consider a way out of the cri- sis. When Ihe coalition took of- fice Jan. 1, it was heralded as n political organ lo end cenlii- ries Catho- lics and I'rolestanls in the six rounlies. Politicians saw -its downfall as.a major and pcr- h'ups fatal setback lo Urilain's elaborate peace Temperatures near lOfl -de- grees are expected through Thursday as ;Abilqne's heal wave.. to thrive ..on cloudless.-.days and- southerly Hinds, forecasters at'the Nation- al Weather Service said Wednes- day. The high Tuesday was 98 de- grees, w e a t h e r man Jerry said, adding that no relief is iii sight for few days. THERE IS SOME hope that; niay again form in' the area over the 1 lie: cold front edging down from'the north is moving too -slowly to affect" the area soon, O'Bryant said. don't know when lo expect it but it' looks like pur best chance of busting this 100-de- gree he said. The leading edge of the front is centered in Kansas, a Weath- er Service .map indicates; how- ever, because of its slow pace, it is men'ioned .only in the extend- ed; five-day forecast put out by Ihe Weather Service in Washing- lon.'D.C. Forecaster Frank Cannon Tubsday.it is highly likely1 the. area will get no more rain in May, which is .statistically the rainiest month of the year. So Far' only .72 inches of .fain have accumulated at Abilene Municipal This 'falls shorl of the expected average rainfall by more than three inches. Weather Service records show that in 40 years the May rainfall has dropped below one inch. only twice: 1966 with .46 ir.ch and only '.15 inch in the drought year .THE YEAR after that latter entry, however, the area re- ceived a whopping' 13.19: inches of rain in liay.'. Average rainfall for" June calculated at 2.82 inches, the rec- ords' show. Fifteen Abilene students post- cd -a perfect 4.0 grade -point av- erage at Abilene Christian Col- lege for the. 1974 spring semes- ter, according to.Paul Wilson, 1 ACC assistant-registrar. The 15 students were among 93 students who held a 4.0 grade point average for the spring iriestcr, The Abilene students were: Cnl'ia Sue Couch, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Couch, 1032 Pichland'; .laye" Douglas' Crow- dcr, son of Mr. rind Mrs. Leo Crowdcr, 902 Harrison; Donna Lou Dixnn, dnuglitcr of Mr. and Iv'rs. J. T. Wxon, HI. 5: James Gary Douglas's, son of Mi1: and Mrs.'H.C. Douglass, 1719 Glen- haven; Clifton-Edwin DiiBose, son of Dr. and Mrs. Edwin Du-. 21sl; TlnioHiy. Edward -Fulbrigfir, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jnmes 261S Garfield; .Ricky Don Hale i son of Mr.-and Mrs. Ray Hate, 581 E.N. 2Ist; David Clinton Hurlev, 'son of Mr., and Cllntpn V. Hurley, Jr., of 901: Washington- Blvd.. Also, Bmrkla Luckie, daughter (if Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Luckie, 3657 Yale; -Lora Jane Nelson, dniiPhter of Mr; and Mrs. James Nelson, 2565 Madison; Eloisc Jean Olbricht, daughter of Dr. and Mrs.'Thomas Olbricht, 1400 Compere Blvd.; Leroy W; Pol- nick; son of Mr and Mrs. Alvin R. Marshall; Ter- esita Ann Wadsworth, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry F. Wads- north, 534 E.N. John Alien Wray, son of Mr: and Mrs. Ray- mond Wrajv 802 Orange; and Pedro C. Villa, son of Air.'and Mrs. Juan Villa, 5118'Congress. DR. H. 0. WYNNE favors proposal REV. BILL AUSTIN "not definitive a( all7' Continental: Next Baptist Name? A WEEK-MKft WttTM CETS TOO! MSSACI 15WMIS 1 MTS SAVI Additional ly.eoeS hfe ordcii Dtbdlim 3 pm Thuridoy WKNE HNITEI UK By LIZ MOORi; Cknrch Editor A name change for Hie Southern Baplist .Convention will be proposed al the anmtal SBC meeting next mbnlh in Dallas, and it the opinions of Southern Baptist leaders in arc any indicalion, Hie motion will be controversial. W. A. :Crisw'eU, a former SBC presidenl, will present a motion at the meeting June 11-13 that be ap- pointed to study the possibility of changing the SBC's name and lhat Ihey make recom- mendations. Criswcll, minister of First Baplist Church m Dallas, said he would probably suggest Ihe name "Continental Baplist Convention" .for- the nation's largest non-Catholic evangeli- cal He an- nounced his concern aboul the name in an article he pre- pared for the Baptist Stand- ard, news publication of the Haplist General convention.of Texas. PLAIN and simple, truth of the matter is lhat the Southern Baptist Convention is no longer ihe Southern Baptist Criswcll wrote. "It is Northern and Western and Eastern as well as South- ern." "I favor Continental, be- cause others such as General, National and American have all been pre-emplcd by other Baptist Criswcll said. Dr. II. 0. Wynne, minister of South Side Uajilis! Church, agrees with Criswell. He said that lie, loo, Ihinks a name change is needed and that "Continental Baptist" is n good one. "I AGREE Wilh him whole- Dr. Wynne said. 'Southern Baptist' gives a geographical location, yet we have Southern Baptists all over the world. "I don't know if the "propos- al will carry, but it is a move in the righl he add- ed. Dr. Wynne emphasized lhat Ihe change would be in name, nol in doctrine and that the body will always stand for Ihe same principles. The Rev. Bill Austin, minis- ter of U n.i.v c r s i t y Baptist Church said he thought there might be a need for'change but he does, not favor Cris- wcll's proposal. "THAT PABT1CULA R name docs not appeal lo Ihe Rev. Austin said. "It isn't definitive at he said, add- ing lhat "Continental" to many people suggests Europe. More reluctant lo' sec a name change is the Kev.-Mack liidlchoover, minister-of Pi: oncer Drive Daplist Church.' "I am very happy to be identified as a Southern .Bap- he said. Uiiiik most Southern Baptists would like to keep 'the name and any name if advisable, would have lo take several years of adjustment." "What's in Dr. Elwin Skilcs llar- din-Simmons University presi- dent said he docs nol.sec Hie question as a matter for "great debate." "I would happy with.any respectable name which Ihe convenlion- might In said. "It's the people and the cause Ihal.wc'rcprc- sent that have Boone Powell presidenl nf Ilcndrick .Memorial Hospi- tal, declined' to. consider Ihe saying :only lhat "he. had "great.respect for Or. who "was formerly his own Me added 'that "in v'c n t i o n matter, members should ask themselves, "Would there DC a change in   

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