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Abilene Reporter News: Wednesday, May 1, 1974 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - May 1, 1974, Abilene, Texas                                WITHOUT OR WlYH OFFEN15E TO FRIENDS OR-FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS 11 :D' NOJ PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, WEDNESDAY EVENING, HAY 1, PAGES IN THREE SECTIONS Aaocitted si "1 COL. ERIC W. CARLSON AT 96TII BC'.MB WING COMMAND POST thought future lay with air power SAC Familiar Ground For Swedish American Colonel licporief-News MillUry Editor Col. Eric' W.. Carlson, who look command of the 96th Bomb Wing in ceremonies Wednesday morning' at- Dyess AFB. has a few advantages over most new commanders, fie'- (he ter- Kaying lime as interim wing comm a rid- er. ,Col. Carlson succeeds Col..Bill V. Brown, who is leaving Dyess to .'assume duties with the Joint Chiefs of Staff in Washington. A native Texiin, Col. Carlson grew up in the Swedish com- niunily'of'Lu'ml, near Austin. His. parents immigrated "from' Sweden, his father in 1313, his mother in 1916, and began farm- inrr. "We spoke Swedish in Carlson .remembered, "and wo carried on a lot of Swedish traditions in our home, including strong church AFTER COMPLETING seven grades in a two-room, one-teach- er, rural school, lie-went on lo high school at.Elgin. 'It was there that he made what he now considers a crucial decision in his life. "It was during World War II and. mostof the time 1 wasn't in school I .socnt driving. a trac- he said: "Finally I had to drop out for three weeks lo drive Ihe tractor. After that, mv father asked me if I wanted to go back to school. I decided to go back ahd.iinish." After his'graduation, he into the Army in SeplemL...- He spent two voar. in Hie service, most of 'that time in Japan as a military policeman. When he: was discharged -in 1948, he went back to school at Texas Graduating in 1952, .he i force.. Air "I CHOSB-.THEAjf Force be- cause I thought, the future lay with air power and most of the emphasis would be he said. Hut why. did irTexas 'farm boy choose' 'the >for ca- "One reason, 1 guess, is that! grew 'up' during World he Ihe 'and: 1 gbt> interested -iii Ihe military. "My -parents never '.'dfccour- aged me' from the mililary. even though" I brother in the paratroopers, i think immi- grants have a very strong sense of duty to ;tlicir ''country. J' think I inherite'd some of that." After pilot Irainihtf, Col. Carl- became a flight instructor at Williams AFB, Ariz., then at Laughlin AFB at Del Rio, Tex. IN mt 11K first came lo the Slratefiic Air.Command as a B47 aircraft commander, a member of the first all-lieutenant bomber crew 'in. the wing at Davis-Mon- than AFB, Ariz. He then became an instructor pilot in B47s at Davis-Monlhan. It was while at Davis-Monthan that he met and married Rice, -who was a ju- nior at (he University of 'Arizo- na. When 'the' was nyin? deactivated in 1960, Col. Carlson went (o Bergstrom AFB as an aircraft commander in a B52 and as squadron operations officer, ile left Berfjslrom in J964 lo attend Hie Air Command Staff College. Afler 'graduating from staff college and also getting a mas- v.-. ;adniinis- Uniyersily, it was back; to the cockpit of- a as -an. aircraft Minot ;AKB, N.D. Leaving Minot in 1907, he went to the National War College in Washington.' After graduation he went to Air Base, working with tactical (he colo- lie) said.srnilihgj for'the peo- pie down -the ;road here' (refei1- ,463rd Tactical Airlift FROM -VIETNAM, Coh Cari- back-to SAC, this time' to headquarters. as chief of cur- rent operations division and lat- er as senior commander in the SAC command post. He came to Dyess in July 1972 as dcpnly .commander for operations, then served in. var- ious including vice wing commander and interim wing commander. He also served a temporary duty .lour as deputy commander for operations wilh' Ihe 772ncl Bomb Squadron in Guam and look part in the 'intensive bomb- ing of North Vietnam near Ihe end of the war. Col. Carlson said (hat he ex- pected to make no major changes .in Ihe operation at Dyess. "Really; we just follow poli- cies that are 'set down for he said. "The only change might bo in my style of doing Ihings." The colonel said that he, his wife and four children feel very much al home iii Abilene. "We are traditional he said, "and we appreciate Ihe warmlh and friendliness of the people in Abilene." Weather 'All-Clear' Sounded By, JOE DACY II Reporter-News Staff Writer Forecasters at the National Weather Service effectively sounded "all clear" Wednesday on weather conditions for the next few days. Weatherman Frank Cannon said the Wcalhei1 Service has cancelled a flash flood watch, and said clearing skies and an end to the "welcome" showers is expected. Allhough radar picked up a few scattered showers Wednes- day said these are dissipating. father than building. CANNON. SAID the light to moderate rain fell almost con- tinuously throughout Tuesday night "and Wednesday morning, accumulating .90 inch in vain gauges at Abilene Municipal Airport. The two-day total, he said, was 1.36, which pushed the tolal rainfall measurement for April over the normal 2.47 to 3.44 inches, he said. Measurable rain fell from p.m. Tuesday to a.m. Wednesday, Cannon said. He added that allhough the rainfall was. heavy in many areas, the heaviest in Coleman at 3.66, no flooding or other damage was reported to the Weather Service. The Cqlemari County sheriffs', department confirmed that no flooding'had occurred there de- spite a two-day accumulation ot 4.56. inches. "It helped' having that ram (We fairly steady and light to Cannon explained. .The'continuous outpouring of moisture, slow and steady, ap- parently allowed for adequate runoff as Cannon said no flash floods reported cither. OVERNIGHT ,-IUIN reporls from area towns ranged in accu- mulation "from .20 .in Rolan to that! 3.68''in 'Coleman. Two-day totals ranged from Coleman's 4.56 lo .44 at Breckenvidgc. Most areas received al least an inch of rain Tuesday and Wednesday, however. The Department of Public Safely also reported no special problems due to the rain. The only mishap, a DPS dispatcher said, was probably not caused by the weather. A car went off the road al 1 a.m. Wednesday 20 miles south- east of Breckenvidge on FM 717 when the driver apparently tried lo avoid an animal in the road, the dispatcher said: IN ABILENE, a West Texas Utilities Co. spokesman said the rain caused "no trouble at and a Southwestern Bell Tele- phone spokeswoman reported only scattered cases of wel ca- ble troubles. Telephone cable problems, usually occur only alter high winds, she said. Forecaster Cannpii said' now (hat the skies are clearing, a gradual wanning trend should begin as winds shifl back to a southerly flow. These. conditions, he said, should continue for a few days, at least until the effect of a new Pacific front generating to [he WHERE IT RAINED ABILEr- "Wed. Municipal 1.3G Total for Normal for. 2041 2318 River Oaks 3936 3402 S. Dvess 1.23 1.00 1.37 3.10 3.80 .44 2.10 CLYDE 1.60 4.5S COLORADO l.'O .89 1.3G 1.30 KNOX 2.35 LAWN MEHKEL MOHAN PAINT ROCK RANGER ROTAN SNYDEH STAMFORD SWEET-WATER TUSCOLA WINTERS 1.00 .60 1.00 2.00 1.50 .20 .28 1.27 .50 ,50 l.GO 1.10 .1.30 3.30 1.50 1.30 3.00 1.39 1.45 1.60 2.80 WEATHER U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Holicnal Weather Service IWedlher Map. Pa. 2A} ABILENF AHo 'VICINITY (10-mile- rodlusl Rain and showsrs ending Icday, becoming parlly cloudy (onlgrtl and Thurs- day. Warmer, Thursday. East ID southeas- terly -winds 5 ID 15 rrph becoming souther- ly ID lo 10 rnph or. Thursday. High Tn Tfie upper Ks. Law tcnicht In the upper Wan .Thursday'in Ihe" aft.'Prcba- bilily ol rain will decrease lo 20 per cent this High and low for- 24 he UTS ending 9 a.m.: iS qntf High and law. same dole losl year: S3 anrf 5R; .17. "_" Sunsel -sunrise today: lonighli-.flHO. northwest can lx> determined. "If the front comes Ihis far south it 'might bring more rain in a few he said. Other- wise, the Abilene area will have lime to let the week's moisture soak in, he- added. Kerrville Deluged By 7-Inch Rain By The Associated Press eight inches of rsjin hit the ijill Country during the night and flooding downpours persisted over much of the state today. By Ihis morning the'deluges, spreading .toward the east be- hind a slow-moving cool front, were filling some .'streets and low areas in the San Antonio, Fort Worth and" Dallas areas. Kerrville. measured 7.75 inches of rain before it started tapering off and there was con- siderable street flooding, police dispatcher James T_- Cassidy reported. Two car's were swept inlo raging Creek in Ker- had "to rescue the two. girls in them, but they r-weren'l-" Cassidy said. The.'officers also escoiicd -two occupants house in''-a a precaution. 3 Nabbed in Zebra Case Carlson Takes Command of 96lh The'traditional passing of the wing pennant marked Ihe change of command.of the 9Cth "Bomb Wing at Dyess AFB Wednesday morning. Col. F.ric Carlson, formerly vice commander of the wing, look command, succeeding Col. Bill V. Brown, who is being as- signed lo Ihe Pentagon, Joiul Chiefs of Staff, as di; actor'of operations, PRESIDING AT the ceremony was Brig. Gen. Raymond Ilaupt, commander of Ihe 12lh Air Divi- sion. Col. Brnwn had been 06th commander since Aug. 23, 1973, when he relurned from U-Tapao Airfield, Thailand, where he bad commanded the 307th Strategic Wing. Col. Brown entered llie Air Force, as an enlislcd man in 1950 and was commissioned in 1CS1 in (he Officers Candidate School program. He graduated from pi- lot training in 1958 at Goodfel- low AFB in 1950. He is married lo the former Dona Campbell of Topcka, Kan. Col. Carlson lias served as wing vice commander, rear cell- c-lon commander, interim com- mander and dcpuly commander for operations since his arrival at Dyess in July 1972. S.-VN 'Three black men -were ariesled today in' the Zebra street shoot- ings in which 12 whites have been murdered and six others wounded in random attacks over months, police said. Police said there were.other .suspects. Chief of Inspectors Charles Il.irca said J.C. Simon, 20, and Larry Green, 22, were arrested nl about 5 a.m. in connection witli the unprovoked attacks. They were booked on murder charges. Barca said a third miin, whom.- lie idnlified only as was arrested ]y 'before'. .gave no :other Barca--said one of three is also charged'. with '.kidnaping, but he did not idenlify him. Earlier, referring .lo ..Siman and Green, Barca said: "They're charged with the so- called Zcijra murders and con- spiracy lo commit murder. We are anticipating 'more arrests." lit would: -llh graf He would not give details on the arrests ov provide more in- formation .aboul tlie men. Lt. William'O'Connor said Si- mon and Green were booked at Ihe Hall of Justice "for murder and other charges. The investi- gation, is'continuing and. there possibility b! other ar- rests." Television station KRON had reported Tuesday night that Ihe Zebra killings were related "to a weird aud biznrre initiation for a black militiinl group.1' had HO comment on the report. "Amid speculation thai a break .in..the case near, Siayor'Joseph Aliolo had prom- ised earlier will be a lot clearer" "after disclosures he planned to make today. The slayings: 3rd graf McCoilum, Collie Finish 1-2 Among Cooper Seniors Mack Keilh JMcCollum, son of Mr. and Mrs. O.-D. McCoilum, was announced as valedictorian of the 1974 graduating class of Cooper High School Wednesday morning. McCoilum leads his.class aca- demically with an overall high school grade point average of G-4499 on a grading system in which As in regular courses arc ivorlli six points and As in hon- ors courses count seven points. Salulatorian of Ihe 1974 senior class is Natban Lloyd Collie, son of Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Collie His overall GPA in high school is 0.3230. Olher members a! Ihe aca- demic six" were Clay J. Cockercll, ranked third, son of Dr. and Mrs. E. G. Cockerell; Casey Cockrcll, fourth, daughter Good Grooming Said Dress Code Key By BLUE RUCKER Q Ilrv our dress code for city employes and police cemparc with otter large cities sucli as El Austin, Amarilto awl Fort In AMIne Uey kave mnsUcfces, cut sWebms and wear stoft Wr; kw is It handled la A Generally speaking, in'.tliose other cit- ies, rules for city employes are more lienient but'restrictions on police officers are simi- lar. Here's a rundown: City Manager Rodger Lime says Fort Worth has no stated polity-but wouldn't allow, just anything it's handled on an' individual, basis. Fort W.prth police arft al- lowed mustaches, hair can be of moderate length if properly cared for, sideburns to the bottom of the ear but no muttonchops, no cxlremc styles, no beards or goalees. city manager'says: "We're knlcnt, even allow pant.suits for females but no short shorls." Aniarillo po- lice are allowed mustaches but no beards. TJte Auslin personnel director says this is strictly up to the discretion of the depart- ment head. Hair length is of no'considera- tion unless it's a safely hazard in a particu- lar job. A department head would not re- quire an employe to cut his hair simply because he doesn't like long hair, but only if safely is'involved. Austin police Chief n. A. Milen says his officers, may wear neally trimmed mustaches, not extending below the comer of the mouth, sideburns, unflarcd lo the bottom of the earlobe (not mutlon- Hair must be tapered and neatly cut not extending over the.collar. No beards allowed in Ihe Austin police force. The El Paso city personnel manager says is''-handled by each department head. Some areas are stricter than others. In cer- Itiin lobs, especially those w-hcre an employe handles the the department head might be concerned .with size of a beard or muslache, but (here is no policy outlawing them. The F.l Paso city police force must bo although neatly-trimmed mus- laches are permitted providing they're not handlebars. Hair must be neatly trimmed, cannot be combed down over the eyes. Sidc- arc okay provided tliey don't extend below Ihe botlom of the car. They've vc- la.xcd on (he.hair business a litlle, it can be worn longer if it doesn't hang down over Ihe collar. Hair can't bush out OTI the side of the head. No beards allowed. Abilene. City Manager II. P. Clifton says he feels thai as long as employes are public servants Ihey should dress like Ihe average citizen. Mustaches are okay if neatly trimmed, no beards, goatees or handlebars arc allowed, sideburns are all right but not mutlonchops. As far as hair length, "I like to see Ihe collar and enough ot the ears to be sure llity have cars." Cliflon says as long as an employe is reasonably well-groomed he doesn't have complaints from the public.He doesn't want to antagonize the average citizen, thus the regulations.. Abilene Police Chief Wairen Doilson says Ihe police force dress standards arc the same as for the other city employes. Q. I wish you would find out how many yards of 100 per cent cotlnn male- rial, 4.i inches can be made from one bale of colton? A. Jim Ulassi, manager of yarn division at Ailcen, Inc., look out his paper and pen, came up wilh Ihcse figures: from an aver- age 500 pound bale you could make yards of shirling clolh or 6W yards of denim clolh. So you sec much depends on the weight of the clolh. Eliirling clolh is used for men's shirls, women's blouses, sheets, pil- lowcases aud that soil of thing. Everybody in this (own knows what denim is'used for. Q. I need (o wrilc Lawrence H'clk. Could you gel his mailing address? A. Wrilc him at 100 Wilshirc Blvd., Suile 700, Sanla Monica, Calif. MM01. Address questions lo Action Line, Kov ,10, Abllctt, To.vas 7SSW, Names will nol be used but questions must he signed and addresses given. Please Include tel- ephone numbers If possible. of Mr. and Mrs. II. B. Cockrell; Joanna Temple, fifth, daughter of Dr. Joe Temple; and Debo- rah A. Smith, sixth, daughter of 'Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Siiiilh. ALL SIX WILL participate in the .graduation 'ceremony sched- uled May 27. The top two gradu- ates will be the commencement speakers. McCoilum, who is planning an engineering major al the Air Force Academy, is vice presi- dent of National Honor Society, business manager of "Commen- and a member of Fu- ture Physicians of America. A member of Ilia Cougar fool- ball team, McCoilum has also served as president of Ilic Fel- lowship of Christian Athletes. Collie, president of N'HS al Cooper and vice president of Ihe Kulnrc Teachers of America, plans lo attend Texas Tech Uni- vprsily as a pre-mcil major. He is n member of Ihe Cougar golf learn. .Also a golfer, Cnckerp'.I is president of Uie Future Physi- cians of An .erica and "Com- mental-ins" short slory editor. Third place winner in Ihe Civi- lan essay contest this year, Cockercll has also participated in UIL science competition. Like Collie he also plans to major in pro med at Texas Tech 6.2615. i- His grade average is MISS COCKRELL, whose grade average is 6.2285, is cor- responding-secretary of the Stu- dent Council, stale parliamen- larin of Ihe FTA. and a member of NHS and Ihe Cooper Ex- change'Club. Treasurer of the 'tournament speech team and a competitor in UIL prose .contests. Miss Cockrcll .plans lo major in com- munications at Soulhern Melh- odist University. Miss Temple, named Girl of Ihe Year by the Abilene Kx- Club Tuesday, holds a 6.1059 GPA. She is art editor and a Iri editor of Ihe school yearbook and co-edilor of "Com- inentariiis." She is also recording secre- tary of the Classical Film Socic- Iv and corresponding secretary of NHS. she will enler Dob Jones University in Greenville, S.C. Ihis fall and major in Eng- lish. Miss Smith, winner of Ihe sen- ior high biology sweepstakes in this year's Science Fair, plans a pre-med major at Baylor University. A Iri-cditor of Ihe she is also a member of Fulure Phvsicians of America ami NHS. Her grade average was 6.1937. Teacher Plans To Write Book Retiring from the teach- ing profession after 40 Allene Free recoils Ihe highlights of her career and reveals her plans to wrile a book. Slory and pic- lure, Po. IS. NEWS INDEX Amusements........... 11C Business Mirror 4C Bridge 4Q Classified 6-IOC Comics 5C Editorials ................4A Horcscopc.............. 9A Hospilal Palicms 2A Obiluorici 8A Sporis MC To Your Good Hcollh HA TV Loq 20 TV Seoul ?H Women's News.......... 3B   

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