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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: April 16, 1974 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - April 16, 1974, Abilene, Texas                                gftflero Reporter "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT Byron 93RD YEAR, NO. 303 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 70604, TUESDAY EVENING, APRIL 16, PAGES IN THRICK SECTIONS Dissociated Prest Major Buyers Seek Less Oil in Texas Robbery Role Questioned By EI.MG Easter Bunny's Eggs Newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst, left, was accused Monday nigliL of being a material witness in the robbery oC a San Francisco bank earlier in the clay. But .ruilhorilies said Hiss Hearst may have been forced into taking part in the holdup. The FBI says tlie photo at right shows Miss Hearst taking part in the robbery, recorded on a hidden bank camera. Three women previously linked with the ter- rorist Symbioiiese Liberation Army also were identified from photographs. Story on Pg. 2B. (AP Wirephotos) AUSTIN, Tex. (AP) The Texas Railroad Commission set the statewide oil allowable for May at 100 per cent today after one major buyer noted Hint its first shipment of Mid- east oil in some time is ex- pected later this month. It was the 26th consecutive monthly allov.'able to be sol at 101) per cent. Major buyers of Texas crude oil asked for barrels a (lay next monlli. a decrease of from Api'il. The largest reduction was 117.000 barrels by Exxon Corp., and a spokesman said part of Ilia reason was the availability of foreign crude. John Yacger or Exxon said il expects InO.MO bar lets a day from the Persian next inonlh, willi the first shipment due in late this month. During Hie Arab oil emba' he said, Exxon re- lied on Venezuelan oil. Sun Oil Co. and Union Oil Co. of Cr.lifornia also reduced their nominations for Texas oil in May, but they said it was merely to gel in line with what they'arc actually receiv- an indication Hint they needed less oil. Chairman Jim Lai.gdon or the commission said Texas' crude oil slocks as of March 29 totaled 90 million barrels, an increase of SOO.OCO from a year ago. Total United Slates oil slocks had increased by 3 million barrels, he said. As usual the Hast Texas and Kclly-Snyder fields were held to 86 per cent production in May. dominations by major pur- chasers for May. in barrels per day. wilh any changes in parentheses: Amoco Atlantic liichficld Chevron Cities Service, 110.000 Continental 3C.OOU Diamond .Shamrock E x x o n o3o.OOO (minus Gulf Mobil 345.000 Phillips iii.OOtl Shell 325.0M Sun (minus-ICO) Texaco Union of California (minus -1.0001 Wider Contacts Sought by Nixon Symbol of New Life Robbery Suspects' Backgrounds Obscure Jly lillle thrcc-year-olil niece asked me a (jiicsllon that I Mad to answer, "I don't know." she said, "Von sure are stupid-" t'lciiau, I've got Hi regain licr confidence! Find nut how we got the custom of an Easier Ininny ami where do Hit eggs conic In? A. don't know how you're gonna or- plain all tins to a but the eggs are symbols of new life. Coloring them red symbolizes the blood of redemption, oilier colors have no special significance. Several theories are printed about that Itnnny The hare was a symbol-of the An- glo-Saxon goddess spring, Koslre. From rnlkuiilv the hare lias also been a symbol associated with Hie phases of the moon Since Easter in a movable feast, dependent on its (late on the phases of the moon, the hare somehow gut worked And tlie theories go on and on and on. Actually your first answer was the best. (1 Please discuss the lorm, "detente'' which is being used so frequently lately. A Essentially it means elimination ol se- i-ion's conflict. The French word is defined in the dictionaiy iis "a. relaxation of in-erna- lional tension" or "an casing of discord between nations." Or you might say it s smiling and slinking hands after a long, hot argument. Q. Tell the lady (hat iv.ole you about renewing her cedar closets to lake sonic real line sandpaper and rab the cedar. It'll bring lliat scent out. Sounds logical enough. don't guar- antee it'll wore, we haven't tried il but our readers often come up wilh do-it-yourself, terns the experts never liiought ot. Q. Could help rind a Mr. Tom Weils wlio hail a Uuolli at the rcccul Arls and Crafts I'air held at the Civic Center.' tic had little tables and chairs and pin cushions made out 01 cans. A Would you settle for Thomas u. Webb who is a tin can arlisl living at Ht. 5. Box 394 in Ahiienc-; Or could it ue u'. u. 'ilium- as from I.a Keria, 'u-xas YuJM. who Had miniature tin tan luvniUirc on Ina is I'd Uox (I. I'm Irjiiig lo be an organic garden- er lint mi uiiinil} Iroiiuie vmi MM' HUBS or pill bugs. Is inert) sumci.....g I touid use lo kill them licsmcs a pcslicuic. 'Incy'rc cvcryulicre ami tncj IT, canny iiji my garden. A We're fresh out of natural predators for sow bugs but Mrs. Hoy Shake, wile of an ACC entomologist, passed along her recipe for boiled sow bugs. She lays a couple of boards out in the garden. Alter three or four days she lifts up the boards and finds under- neath a nice collection of sow bugs. .Shake then pours boiling hoi water on the bugs It gets them everylimc. Since you have so many, you may have to repeat the process. For more immediate results, the County Agent recommends mixing four tablespoons of 80 per cent Sevin weltable powder to a gallon of water. Spray in the late afternoon when the bugs arc traveling. Address questions lo Action I.ine, Box 30, Abilene, Texas 79804. Names will nol be used hut. questions must be signed and addresses given. Please include tel- ephone numbers if possible. Ily LINDA Kit AM at a suburban Concord Associated Press identified as an SUV SAN FRANCISCO (AP> -Three women with The house was class backgrounds, brought lo her under the name gether by leflwing politics Dcvoto. radical feminism, became volved last fall in a groni) the Idler she says: "As a called the Symbioncsc of Ihc Symbioticsc tion Army inforjiialion- unit, I fighl All three were charged our common oppressor day with armed robbery of tliis I do with my gun bank. They are Nancy as my mind." 1'errv, 2G; Patricia Perry grew up in Santa and Camilla C. Hall, Oil miles north of here. If captured and described her as -a they face up lo 23 years Goldwaler conspi'va- prison and a She went to President Named as a material alma mater. WhillJcr ness in the federal before to was Patricia Hearst, University of California at Ijie SLA claimed it from a Berkeley apartment petile brunette earned Tcb. 4. The Fill said bachelor's -degree in Kng- newspaper heiress was in during Hie late ISGOs when bank willi [hem either iugly or unwillingly a gun. The personal, experiences which drove Ihc radical INDEX ists from middle class 8C Bridge 8A grounds lo the world of 4-8C rilla terrorism arc 3C Mrs. Perry, using the 4A spoke of her -4B Hospital Patients 7 A trcs in a lengthy "letter to 3A people" last January. The 1-2C ter was sent to Your Hcollh 6A here shortly after a Lcq 2A TV Scout 2A was issued charging her News 3B the campus seethed will! radi- cal unrest. She separated from lier husband, black pianist George Perry, more than a year ago. Friends said Mrs. Perry worked as a topless blackjack dealer in Hun Francisco and as a counter hand at a .juice stand in Berkeley. The stand's owner said she once scrawled "Death lo the Pigs" in her own blood on a wall. "Kahizah" was devoted to prison reform ami was a fre- quent visitor at Vacaville state prison facility where she worked with the Black Cultur- al Association. Miss Sollysik also was known for her involvement willi prisoner rights efforts. She had her name legally changed to "Jlizmoon." the nickname given her in a love poem from a female friend. Miss Sollysik grew up in Go- lela, norlh of Santa IJarhara. I'roin I9G8 to 1971 she attend- ed. Hie University of California at Berkeley and was known as a quick learner. "Mizmoon" worked as a partible janilor at the Berke- ley Public Library nnd alleg- edly collaborated with SLA .General Field Marshal Cinque in writing the founding docu- ments of Ihc SLA. is believed to be escaped convict Donald D. DcFreeze. One of "ilizmooii's" neigh- bors was Camilla Hall, who worked for three years as a Minnesota social worker wilh a bachelor's degree from the University 'of .Minnesota. The blue-eyed blonde moved lo Berkeley in She vanished Feb. 15, five days before FBI agents lo question her. Mrs. Ferry ended her Janu- ary letter to the media with the quote: "There are (wo Ihings to remember about revolution, we are going lo jet our asses kicked, and we are going lo win." She also sent her love lo Joseph JJemiro. 27, and Ilussell Lillle, 24. The two are in jail, charged mur- der in the suicide bullet slay- ing of Oakland School Supl. Marcus Fosler last November. WASHINGTON (A I') Operating under strict, post- Watergate guidelines, the. While House is trying to en- courage, communication with oiilsidc groups that seek the car of the adminislralion. The guidelines are designed lo prevent, improper interven- tion with regulatory agencies. William .1. Haroody Jr., a special consultant to President Nixon, has been at work for nearly two months ns Ihc lop While House aide responsible for. keeping contact with busi- ness, labor and other-interest groups.' lie says he is trying to im- prove tliosc relationships by listening lo whal. such inter- ests have lo say as well as Idling them White House posi- tions. Now. after Watergate's focus on questionable dealings within government, Daroody says "there is a general sensi- tivity both within government and outside" to the delicate na- ture of such contacts. "When a request is made for assistance lo arrange a meeting wilh a policy maker oftentimes the individual will specifically state: 'I am not asking for special trcalmenl or he said in an in- terview, tlaroody's role was field until early 1973 by Charles W. Colsori, who also advised President Nixon tin political matters. Colson's name came up at several points during Water- gale and related investiga- tions. Testimony and While House mcmos linked him to Ihc ITT antitrust settlement case. Colson has since been indict- ed in the Watergate covcrnp case. Last fall, the White House counsel's office put out new guidelines for all staff mem- bers dealing with independent rcguhitory agencies such as the Securities and Exchange Commission and Federal Trade Commission. An official familiar with Ihc new policy said there had been sonic problems because it written record of contacts wns not kept, liul he would nol the problems. Now, such contacts must be. checked in advance with the counsel's office and a post- contact wrillen report must he submitted. Agnew Writing Book To Build Confidence Close Voting Expected Bellwether Election Bv CAIII, I.EURSDORF At' I'olilical Writer SACilX.AW, Mich. (AP1! Voters in Michigan's tradition- ally Republican 8ih District choose a new congressman to- day in ;i special election that was expected lo be close. President Nixon campaigned through rural areas of tho dis- trict last Wednesday in nn ef- fort In hoosl the GOP turnout and help Republican Jamrs Sparling Jr., 45. overcome the lead polls indicate for his Democratic opponent, Rep. J. Roheil Traxler, -12. Polls in Ihe sevcn-ccunly district, where a Democratic congressman was last elected in.1932, were scheduled In be onnn from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. EOT. County election officials pre- dict a turnout of 50 per cent of Ihc district's voters comparable willi four previous special congressional elections this year in which Democrats captured three loiig-lime Kc- publican seals. Polls completed before Ihe Nixon visit showed Traxler slightly ahead, with a consid- erable undecided vole. Inter- views in Ihe district last week indicated few voters would choose their new congressman on the basis of their feelings .aboil! Nixon. However, a Spnrlim; victory is certain be seen bv Ihc While. House as a big boost for rvixon. If Traxler wins. Demo- crats are expected to cite the vole as evidence of Nixou un- popularity. Previous Democratic victo- ries have increased fears among GOP House members of a Republican disaster in next November's congression- al elections. The 8th District scat berime vacant earlier this year vhcn Republican James Harvey, who had held it since IflGtl and won with 59 per cent in 1072. resigned to become a federal judge. Sparling, a former polilical wnlcr for Ihe Saginaw News who was Harvey's lop assis- tant for 13 years, has sought to discount Ihc Nixon influence, arguing the real issue is which candidate will make the best congressman. lie has said he will vole for Nixon's impeachment if the evidence warrants, supported the House Judiciary Commit- tee's action last week in sub- poenaing presidential tapes and warned voters against taking out their "disappoint- ments and frustrations" at the polls. Traxler, an attorney who has been campaigning for the scat since last fall, has echoed the Democrats in olhcr special congressional contests, mak- ing Nixon and his administra- tion's, record the chief issue. YORK (AP) "When I was young, 1 thought it was a lot more likely lliat I would grow upu lo he.a novelist than vice president of Ihe United Stales. The wrillen word has always fascinated me." That's bow former Vice president Spiro T. Agnew de- scribes his new role as a writ- er. In an interview in the, cur- rent issue of Ladies Home Journal, Agnew says he decid- ed to write a novel to build confidence after a "very trau- matic experience." Agnew pleaded no contest lo income lax charges and re- signed the vice presidency October. Agnew said he is writing ev- ery word of the novel Very Special Relationship" himself, in longhand on lined yellow legal paper or dictating dialogue in Ihe den of his Maryland home. The book is about a vice president a decade in the fu- ture who the dupe of Iranian militants who want lo cause an all-out confronta- tion bclwecn the United Slatc-i the Soviet Union.'1 Agnew says he will use his personal knowledsc of the vice presidency and the Washing- ton scene hut that Vice Presi- dent Porter Newton of the hook is not Spiro Ag- new. or any other former vice president. Caufield is a wealthy, aristo- cratic Ivy Leaguer who falls in love with the secrclarv of health, education and "beautiful, amber-eyed Meredith Lord." "Writing these love scenes frightens me to says Agnew. The former vice president said he doubted the scenes would be loo realistic for Ihe pages of Ihc Ladies Home Journal. He added, "1 have to admit that I won't alway; be. writing from my own experi- ence. I'm not -a man of great experience in this area." Agnew said he couldn't say whether President Nixon would read his book. have had no contact with him since I Agnew said. "Actually I don't know how much reading Mr. Xixoa doc.s or what his personal ban- its are.'1 Teacher Beaten By Intruder A 67-yoar-oJil school teacher was Hie victim ol an apparently .senseless heating aljoul p.m. Monday, police snjd. Mrs. Bess Hell of 113 Sayfcs, f. firsl grade teacher at Ahiienc Christian School, reported to the police that she awakened lie- Iwccn and 11 p.m. Monday when a man came into her bed- room and begaii healing .her in Ihe face and head with a rock. The man fled when she began lo scream. I.T. liir.t, DAVIS, who investi- gated tlie beating, said that the attacker had evidently gained entry by breaking the ghtss out of a back door. Mrs. Eell was treated by Dr. Sol Esles for a cut oven her left eye and several bruises, then released. Capt. George Sullon said thai burglary was apparently nol Ilie motive for Hie break-in since nothing was taken froiii the home. .Mrs. Kcll told police that she had no idea who her attacker might have been and could give no description of Ihe man. "WEATHER U.S. DEPARTMENT OF fOMMEHCI National service [Weather Mop, Pg. 7A) AFMI FI'lE AND VICINITY [ICmi f ladius) Generally (air fcday ar.d fo- rt nhi. cJoutJy o.i V.'nr- mcr lo.i'nhr_ond Wednesday. fo 15 r 2J t me Cole year: 41 Approaching Front Not Exciting to Weathermen By JOE DACV II Henorlcr-N'ens Stxtf Writer Xolhing Nature has been able Id come up wilh seems to alfccl Ihc generally fair wcathcr'in Ihc Abilene area, forecasters at the National Service point- ed out Tuesday. A high level trough swinging down across north Texas is the reason for the picking up of northerly winds Tuesday, said forecaster Jerry OT.ryan1.. But the trough did not stem the gradually rising tempera- tures, he added. And there is a cold front p. preaching from the but according 16 is more on paper thEin anything else. "It's hard lo get excited atioul be said, alluding to (he front's weak and disassociated nalnre. Temperatures behind thai front arc as warm vis they are in in front, he added. "We are under a big ol' high covering almost the whole Unit- ed Stales except for Florida." O'Bryant explained. The ccnler of the system. Vc is over N'ebraska iDil miles away. The small pressmc gradient. there. 1.023 here accounts for the light winds and warm tem- peratures, he said. 0'Bryant said the conditions are likely lo continue for x while.   

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