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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - April 15, 1974, Abilene, Texas                                "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSETO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR'WORLD EXACTLY AS IT 93KD YEAR, NO. 302 PHONE 673-4271 79604, MONDAY EVENING, APRIL 15, PAGES IN THREE SECTIONS By ELIJE flUCKEH Application for New TV Being Processed Q. I heart a new TV slallon was he- Ing constructed in Abilene on Ihe U11F band. Any iiord on conslniclloii progress, like proposed power, and chances o[ a network affiliation? If II ilocs go on Ihe air, what channel would i( he on, will il lie ready and who iirc Ihe station's backers'.' A. You're fulla questions. General Manager diet Darwin says Rill be at least six months before it's in operation. The FCC has ncccplcd the station's application, is now processing it. Construction should be- gin in about four months. Darwin says they've applied for Channel 15 with maxi- mum power, the station will be independent as tney have not entered into contract nego- tiations with any network. NBC and ABC nre already taken, so it it did affiliate with a network il would have to tie CDS. Darwin tells us lie plans to show lots o[ movies, syndicated shows, local news, chil- dren's .shows and it's within (lie realm of possibility (hat he could draw from Darwin is presently manager of KDCD-TV in Midland. The new station is owned by Henry L. Scale of I'iclronics Inc. in Dallas. Q. 1 once read In your column about how to keep weevils from gelling Into flour and corn meal. Overnight, my cup- boards arc full o[ (hem. Would you re- peat your answer. A. A good way to prevent them, home remedy-wise, is to scatter bay leaves about the cupboards. We gained this little gem from an Action Line reader who moved here from Canada. You'll want to get rid of the weevils you have already with a household insecticide spray, llcfore you spray, be sure to clean the cupboards real good, throwing out any cereals, flour etc. containing wee- vils. Some stales Pennsylvania and Massachusetts for example arc called commonwealths. What is a common- wealth1.' A. Any stale in the union could call itself a commonwealth since the dictionary de- fines the term as a nation or a state in which there is self government. Four slates arc officially called commonwealths in Hie Massachusetts, Pennsyl- vania and Virginia. Q. Is It legal lo leave an old Inopera- ble, unlicensed wreck parked on cily slrcels? One's been on onr street for nearly four monlhs and it's a downright (raffle I'.S. Don't (ell them wlio complained, (heir kids mlglil do some- thing lo my place while I'm gone. A. We sure won't toll. We relayed your anonymous complaint to the police dcpart- ment.and were told the owner or the junker is going to have it visitor pronto. Q. On (he cover of Parade magazine several years ago was printed a "Shorl Course in tinman Relations." K slarlcd Ilin six most important words In the English language, then the five mosl important, then four, three, (wo and one. seen Hie list printed a (line or two in other magazines but now that I need it. I can't lind il. Hurry, I need it for a speech I'm planning. A. It goes (starling with six "I admit I made a "You did a good "What is your "It yon and "we." The least important word, il says, is "I." Address to Action Line, Box 30, Abilene, Texas 7360-1. Names will not be (ised but qncslions must he signed and ad- dresses given. Please Include telephone numbers if possible. Associated Press (IP) RECESS AT LOCUST ELEMENTARY changes due for 'racially identifiable' schools More Local Integration Seen By GARY 15ALDH1DGE Slalf Writer More integration is appar- ently in slore for Abilene public schools, and indica- tions are that il will come Hiis fall. Texas Kducation Agency (TEA) officials have been studying Abilene Independent School District minority en- rollment figures for several months now as part of an an- nual survey ordered in a 1970 Tyler federal court ruling on desegregation. That ruling ordered TEA lo visit all school districts of more than one campus which have a minority enrollment of more than 66 per cent. TEA is required lo make recommen- dation; on how the school dis- trict can tlenl wilh what the agency calls identifi- able" schools. THE LOCAL schools gaining the most attention from state govcrnmenl officials are Lo- cust and Fannin Elementary Schools. Locust, at G25 S. 8lh, has 74 per cent minority enrollment --50 per cerd Mexican-Ameri- can and 24 per cent black. Fannin, al 272S N. 18th- has 73 per cent minority enroll- per cent Mexican- American and 9 per cent black. Two others, Lee and College Heights, are above 50 per cenl minority but aren't considered lo be approaching the ''racial- ly identifiable" level. Dr. Harold Brinson, superin- tendent-elect, reports Ihal TKA officials think "this is Ihe year" for (he local district to make changes. "IF THIS (TEA rcporl) is Housewife Out Judge Over Jury Duty Frustration L DETROIT (AP) Helen Mueller is a shy. 102-pound housewife who said she "real- ly felt sort of proud" when she was called for federal jury duly. But thai was before she found out what jury duty was like. After 20 days' sen-ice, over throe monlhs, she stomped into U.S. District Court here lo give Judge Fred W. Kaess a good bawling out. I ever get in trouble, I'll never ask for a jury she lold the startled judge. "1 don't want to be judged by a group of angry, frustrated people. "We were herded around like animals, from one pen to another. Nobody says wel- come, or tells you what the rules are, or what your rights arc or what's (-oing on around juu. MUO'L cif the lime you just sit, not knowing what it is you're, wailing for. "People become very re- Mrs. Mueller lold (he judge lasl week. "You'd be surprised how many jurors say Ihey'Il never vote again, because jurors names are drawn from Ihe registered vot- ers. I Ibink that's Judge Kaess agreed and said a judicial committee was working on jury system re- form. But Ihe Draylon Plains housewife wanted lo speak her mind: She said that for one thing, the required 20 days of jury duty can stretch into six months if a juror is never cho- sen for a Irial. So jurors stretch the truth a lillle during their examinalion just to get on a case and get the whole thing over wilh, she said. "I don't mean the jurors she said. "But for exam- ple, I've learned not to say what my husband's profession is, If 1 say he's a social work- er, I'm excused right away. I learned very quickly lo say he is a director for a family serv- ice agency. Thai's OK." filed this spring, for Brinsou said, "then we would have to react by this fall. Un- officially, Ihe agency has lold us this will be the year." The local board of trustees has instructed the administi'a- Nixon Obtains Tax Extension KEY BISCAYNIC, Fla. (AP) President Nixon, who has been told he owes in back taxes and interest, lias obtained a 60-day extension of the April 15 filing date for his 1973 return. Vi'hile House Deputy Press Secretary Gerald L. Warren said the extension was Ihe lype "any taxpayer can re- quest" tor additional time in filing a return. He said Nixon asked for the extension because of the possi- ble effect of the back-lax rul- ing oil his 1973 return. The Internal Revenue Serv- ice and a joint congressional committee on taxation ruled April Z that Nixon owed back taxes lor the years 1969-72. The disallowed Nixon's deductions for the gift of his vice presidential papers and certain real estate. Nixon has said he would pay the taxes. U. S., Saudi Arabia Signs Arms Pact AMMAN, Jordan (AP) The United Slates and Saudi Arabia signed an agreement Sunday under which Washing- Ion will supply Ihe Saudi army with S33.5 million worth of modern arms, and tench Ihe troops how to use them, Ri- yadh radio reported. The arms include tanks, ar- lillcry batteries, sclf-pronelled assault guns and other types, it said. The agreement comes under a technical and military r-oop- eralion accord announced last month, the radio said. Some Puzzled By the 'PGA' The 'PGA' fetters on Foy Farming's personalized li- cense plates cause some puzzlement. But for any- one who knows his profes- sion, they arc self-explana- tory. Slory, picture, Pg. IB NEWS INDEX Amusements 6B Duiincii Mirror...........4Q Bridge 5A Classified 6-1OC Comics................. 7B Editorials Horoscope 8B Hospital Patienls ;........SB Obiluaries 66 Soorls.............. To Your Good Hcadh 4A TV Log 68 TV Seoul 66 Women's News ........y. 38 live staff to prepare a ivuGi by this spring or summer tor possible action lo be taken by the hoard before Ihe new school year begins this fall, says C. G. Wliitlcn, president of Ihe board. Discussing possible causes for the concentration of minor- ity groups in the Fanniu and Locust areas, Brinson said that "over Ihe last 10 years, ;is homes are becoming older, the Anglos are moving out of them, and Mexican-Americans are moving in. "This is what's happening at Fannin and he said, lie thinks of il as a population shift within the town, and the. chief administrator sees no evidence of "while condition plaguing metropoli- tan areas .such as Dallas. TO DEAL with the local problem, Biinson said Uiere were about three realislic ap- proaches. One alternative would be'lo move attendance lines or change the boundaries to in- clude more predominantly white neighborhoods. This method has been used before for other reasons, such as when the population shifted In the degree thai a subsequent boundary change was needed lo house the students, Brinson said. Transferring students one. school lo another is a sec- ond approach that said was a possibility. This is being done now in kindergar- ten in order lo place students where the facilities are avail- able. It's also done voluntarily on a smaller scale at higher levels to balance classroom sizes, Brinson explained. And a Ihird alternative WEATHER U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Hatlenal Viealhtr Service Map, Pg. IA) ABILENE AND VICINITY (ID-mile radius! Mir onrf coal lodoy through Tuesday, Lighl and variable Hlqh loday nwir 70. Low Isnignl in Ihe mW 4Qs. Tuelrfay in Ihe mid 701. M'qh and   can put everyone in the closest school. If we could nail every- one down to one spots for a couple of years, il might be possible." Cooler Weather To Slay Briefly Forecasters at the National Weather Service said Monday that the nip in the air Monday morning was caused by a liisJi pressure system which is circu- lating cool, northern air in to the, area. The condition is expected lo last only a short while, howev- er, said forecaster -Icny O'firyanl. As the high pressure center moves eastward a warm, southerly flow is expected lo re- turn, possibly Tuesday. temperature Monday morning was 38 degrees, he said. Temperatures in the mid 40s are expected early Tuesday. Other than this genlle effect of the high pressure, no weather phenomena arc in store, at least for a while, O'Bryant said. He explained that as yet there arc no organized weather sys- tems in the Pacific northwest, where most of the fronts have been coming from in recent weeks. New Shelling Rakes Across Golan Heights BY THE 1'HliSS Israeli and Syrian, gunners traded artillery "and tank tire on (lie Golan Heights war front today after a weekend of Ihe hardest fighting since the October war. Damascus radio said Syria's defense minister, Maj. Gen. Mustafa Tlas, made a quick trip lo the "forward command headquarters of Syrian forces on Ml. Herman." This was the first official Syrian reference lo such a command since the October war. The Tel Aviv command said Defense Minister Jloslie Day- an also loured Israeli positions on the Golan fi'ont, imd Ihal a Syrian artillery barrage erupt- ed at Iho. time. II. said Dayan was unhurt, but that two Is- raeli soldiers were wounded. The command said shelling resumed this morning along the northern sector of the 300-square-mile hulge captured by Israel during the October fighting. The command also an- nounced the appointment of Brig. Gen. Rafael F.ytan, who led Israel's thrust into Syria in October, lo command Israel's northern fronl with both Syria and Lebanon. Kytan, who was promoted to major general, takes over from LI. Gen, Mordcchai Gur, who was promoted to chief of staff. Israeli fighter-bombers on Sunday attacked Syrian forces on Ml. Hermon and the Golan Heights wliile below Ilieni (lie armies of Uie two countries buttled fiercely wilh tanks and artillery. The Israeli military com- mand, said all ils planes re- tnl'ncd 'safely Sunday, denying a Syrian claim that lour were clowned. Syria also claimed HO Israeli ground troops were killed or wounded, but Israel said only 17 were wounded. Syria said 15 of ils soldiers were killed and 10 weie wounded. Israel said a Syrian com- mando unit made anolhcr at- tempt to an Israeli ob- servation posl at the northern end of Mr. Hcunoni which has an unrestricted view for 100 miles and more, into Syria. The'S y r I a n s have been trying to capture the 'post since April G. Israel said the commandos were discovered at dawn Sunday, and the Is- raelis at the post counterat- tacked. FRANCES I'-AMENTHOLD Rriscoc's opponent Sissy Due Monday For Primary Visit Prances (Sissy) Farenlhold, Democratic candidate for Tex- as governor opposing Gov. Dolph Briscoc, is scheduled lo arriave in Abilene al G p.m. Monday for a news conference and two speaking engagements. She will arrive here by car from Fort Worth after scheduled campaign slops in WeathciTord, Mineral Wells, Brcckenridge and Albany. Mrs. Farcnlhold will answer questions at a news conference at p.m. She will meet vot- ers and speak at a public rally at p.m. on the front lawn of (he old Taylor County Court- house. TUESDAY SlfE will spc-ilc at 10 a.m. in the main room of JlcGlnllilin Campus Center at Abilene Christian College after being introduced al a.m. chapel in Moody Coliseum. Mrs. Farenthold, who received per cent of the voles in the 1972 runoff loss to Briscoe, will leave Tuesday al noon for Sny- der.- The Abilene, visit will be her only appearance here before the May 4 primary election. She is a" former Texas stale representative from Corpus Chrisli and was a leader the legislative reform group, 30." Ihe HEIt SPEECH in Snydev will be at p.m. at Western Tex- as College. Her slops and sneak- ing limes for Ihe remainder of [he week will include: TUESDAY _ nig Spring al 4 p.m.. and Midland, a p.m. press conference. Wednesday a 10 a.m. speech at Clarendon Junior College in-Ilaunlcd Sisters Audi- torium; Pampa, a p.m. speech to notary Club al Coron- ado Inn: Amarillo, a p.m. press confcrcpce at Travclodge HO and a p.m. speech and dinner at Senior Citizens Center, 1300 Polk SI. Thursday a a.m, visit lo West Texas Slalc University: I'lainvicw, p.m. speech; Lubbock, 7 p.m. speech al Coco Inn. Friday 10.15a.m. press conference al Coco Inn; Posl. a noon speech at Hie conrlhou.se; Brown field. p.m. speech at Plaza Kr.slau- ranl; p.m. speech: Soagravss, a a.ni. speech In West Texas Regional Council for Social Studies al Junior Hii'h. 7 Perish in Mississippi Floods IIATTIESBUIIG, Miss. fAP) persons were dead and thousands were temporar- ily homeless today after week- end floods in southern Missis- sippi. The floods were fueled by torrential rains which began Friday and continued nonstop through Sunday, ranging up lo more than 16 inches in areas- Bridges were washed away and many roads were closed in the flood area, which stretched 150 miles acros? Ihc slate from Ihe Mississippi Riv- er on Ihe wcsl to Ihe Alabama border on Ihc cast and as far north as Jackson. The National Guard was called out lo help with evacua- tion.! in Columbia and Ifalties- burg, and a stale civil defense spokesman in Jackson said Ihc number of persons evacu- ated probably would approach major rains were prc- dicied for Ihc area Ihrnngli Tuesday, but some rivers had not yet cresled. Forrest County Civil De- fense Director HarolJ Hill said the Bowie River is ex- pected lo reach a record 32 feet today. It rose to onlv 31 feet during a damaging flood; in 1961. The Forrest County School Hoard said schools would be closed today. Most residents of Ihe small Greene County community of McLain had left their homes by Sunday evening, one resi- dent said, "There Is no point in wail- she said. "They losl so much Ihc lasl time (in Ihc 1961 that they have moved everything out and up to higher ground already." The crest on the Leaf ftiver al McLain is not expected un- til Tuesday or Wednesday. Al Ilatlicsburg, officials said al least 500 persons were housed in five Red Cross amj Salvation Army Centers Sun- day night. Hetween 200 and 300 persons were forced out of their homes Sunday in Ihe low-lying Mor- gantown area near Columbia. Some 100 to IM persons evac- uated homes in other park of Marion County. The fatalities Included a man who drowned when his boat capsized on a Jefferson County lake, three youths whose car ran off a slippery Pike Counly road, two men swept off a bridge when carl of the span collapsed and a man who drowned when his horse fell into a hole while he was herding cattle lo higher grnimd. j   

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