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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: March 27, 1974 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - March 27, 1974, Abilene, Texas                                Dilate "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT 93RD YEAR, NO. 283 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, WEDNESDAY EVENING, MARCH 27, PAGES IN FOUR SECTIONS Associated Prea (If) Streakers Could Get 8 Years ROME (AP) Three Amer- ican youths arrested for run- ning nude across SI. Peter's Square will be 'tried by a Home court on Thursday, no- lice said today. The three could face jail terms up to eight years. It will be the first streaking trial in Italy. The three Robert Mes- nard of Devon, Pa., Raymond Johnson of Portsmouth, N.H., and David Dibagno of Greens- burg, Pa., were among 10 American youths who look the nude fad to (be Holy See. Italian police fired warning shots and seven of them fled. Tlie three others were caught and sent to jail. Mesnartl and Johnson, of Trinity 'College, Conn., were charged with committing ob- scene acts in public and resist- ing arrest. The two charges combined could draw between nine months and eight years in prison upon conviction. Dibagno, of Temple Univer- sity, was charged svith resist- ing arrest, which could bring a sentence of six months to five years. The trio saw their lawyer in jail today after being held in- communicado in Home's bibbia jail for three days. Un- der Italian law they are not allowed to see anyone until having been questioned by an investigating, judge. Italians are particularly sen- sitive about violations commu- ted in the square below Pops Paul VTs apartment. Pope Paul has repeatedly called on Home authorities to he strict in enforcing laws concerning moral behavior in coincidence with the "Holy Year" Hie period of pil- grimage and penance which the Pope decreed for 1974 and 1975 throughout the Roman Catholic church. Most Won't Ask Nixon Aid By CARL LEUBSDOllF AP Political Writer WASHINGTON (AP) A majority of Republican sena- tors running for re-election ihis year say they don't plan to ask for campaign help from President Nixon. Only cue ot 11, Sen. Henry Bcllmon of Oklahoma, says he has asked Nixon to campaign tor him in 1974. Seven of 11 sr.iy they don't want Nixon to campaign for them. The GOP senators were questioned in advance of to- night's fundrais- GOP Senators Polled on Campaign Plans ing dinner, at which Nixon will be the main speaker. Parly officials predicted HIE affair would bring in between and about the same as the Democrats raised at their fundraiser last week and the lowest o[ any GOP dinner in memory. in the half-dozen years be- fore 1973, when the Watergate scandal cut the GOP take to about the annual Re- publican dinners brought in an average of million, reach- By EM.IE RUCKEB Some Trees Must Go, Says Works Director Q. The City Is supposed to straighten Ceihir Creek channel. They've already worked part or II and so far have cul tfowii every living thing, all vegetation, near the new channel. That creek makes a horseshoe bend in Kirby Park. Are they going (o cut down those beautiful old trees In the park? A. Some of Iliem. Director of Public Works Jerry Smith says he's faced with a choice of destroying trees or flooding. His top priority in re-channeling is flood control and improving drainage. Most of what he'll cut are small scraggly mesqniles that take .ill the moisture, kill the grass, causing top soil to wash off. But in Kirby Park, as well as every other area in the city, flood control takes precedence over the trees, he says. "I'll sure save all the trees I can save but those necessary to get (he creek channel through must be removed." Q. Who was Adela Rogers SI. Johns' second husband? In her hook "The Ho- she speaks of him but delib- erately never calls his name. Hfe was an all-American football player at Stanford in (he '20s or '30s anil was later a pro- fessional tennis player. A. It has to be Kichard Hyland. lie wasn't an all-American but he did lelter in football at Stanford in '25, '2G and '27. Of the dozens of references to Mrs. St. Johns, only one or two briefly mention Hyland. They married sometime before 1929, had a son, Richard Itogcrs St. Johns. It's odd Ilieir son carries the name of Sirs. St. Johns' first husband. Q. The Sunday that the big regional Dallas airport opened, my daughter was on Texas International's Ilrsl flight lo laud there. She was asked on arrival at Dallas if she would consent lo being photographed. Of Ihosc on the plane, she was chosen for youth, exuberance, etc. She agreed on two conditions lliat she not miss her connccling flight and that they send her a copy the picture and wile-up. They agreed. They helped her get to her next (light, bid her adieu and promised to send the picture. No picture. So a month ago I wrote TI I'ublic Relations. I wrote what I thought was a nice, Informal, request but they didn't reply. Sly daughter asked tile (o see what I could do. Well, I didn't do so well. See if you can at least get them to answer. A. You now have your picture. TI's Public Relations Department in Houston tells us no promises were made to send pictures to anyone as Ihey photographed dozens of pas- sengers that day. They printed only one picture of each arriving passenger, sent it to the hometown newspaper. Since we haven't ilic space and Ihus rarely use companies promotion pictures, we've sent it to yon. TI will be sending you an extra copy, if you want it. Q. We love Buck Owens.'We never miss his show. Tell us something about him and especially about his two sons. And Icll us about Susan Rave. A. All right, for starters, Buck Owens has four sons and a daughter named Tern. Buck children and wife Phyllis ranch out- side Bakersfield, Calif. He drives the trac- tor cultivates and lends to his horses and prize Black Angus cattle. He was born in Sherman. Texas and he's 44. His sons are Muddy Mike, Jacky and Johnny. Buddy Alan, Ihe oldest, is 25, has written about 40 songs Mama's Medicine is married and lias two'sons. He travels with his (lad's group. Now Susan Rayc. She's 30, born in Eu- gene, Oregon; began her musical career singing in a rock group when she was 17. She switched to country music when her molhcr told her about an audition for a country singer. She gol the job, became a radio and TV personality in Portland, Ore- gon, then a permanent member of Buck Owens' show. ArtUrcss questions (o Acllon Line, Box 30, Abilene, Texas 79MI. Names will not be used questions must be signed anil addresses given. Please Include phonc number.1! If uoisllilc. ing a record million in Despite their noticeable coolness to the idea of having the President campaign for him, most of the. GOP sena- tors said they plan to attend the dinner and don't sec any- thing with the idea of Nixon speaking. "1 think it's great." said Sen. Peter II. Dominick, R- Coio. "He's still the head of our parly." However. Ihe Colorado sea- tor said that, oulside of an upcoming appearance by Vice President Gerald TI. Ford, lie has no plans for outside speakers entering his re-elec- tion campaign. Most of the senators inter- viewed gave that jrolicy as the reason they won't invite the President. 'Many Republicans have ex- pressed fears that Nixon's low standing in public opinion polls could jeopardize many COP congressmen and scua- lors this November. Most of the GOP senator.-; declining Nixon's open offer of campaign help said, however, it would be fine with them if Nixon wanted to make an ap- pearance in their states unre- lated to their campaigns. "He can come to Kansas any time he said Sen. Robert Dole. "If he wants lo campaign in my slate, lie'll be welcome." said New York Sen. Jacob K. Javils. Javits and Dole said, howev- er, they don't plan to ask the President to campaign for Iliem. Sens, Richard S. Schweiker, Vt-Pa., and Charles llcC. Mom Has Pull their owner, enjoy swimming towed around Ihe pool in a Weimaraner pups are taken for a water ride by trailia. The pups, according to their mother, champion shcnvdog Kaecler, in the as much as they enjoy being pool of owner Mrs. Shirley Murray of Parkes, Aus- life raft. (AP Wirephoto) Kissinger, Brezhnev Talks Delayed By BARRY SCIIWEID Associated Press Writer MOSCOW (AP) The first round of talks loday between Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger and Communist' par- ty head Leonid I. Brezhnev was called off, but United States officials said the two leaders were expected to meet later in the day. A U.S. spokesman said the Soviets called a half-hour be- fore tile discussions were scheduled to start to ask for a postponement. He said the Soviets gave no explanation, but sources said the Politburo, the'party's poli- cy-making body, met Ihis morning and Brezhnev would have attended such a meeting. Kissinger met with Brezli- nev twice a day Monday and Tuesday. U.S. officials said the dis- cussions had been going satis- factorily. They'said Kissinger still planned to leave Thurs- day as scheduled. Sources said Tuesday that Kissinger might stay in Mos- cow until the end of Uie week because of an apparent stale- mate in nuclear weapons negotiations. They siiid Kissinger and Brezhnev have been unable so far to achieve the "conceptual break-through" lhal would lead to a new treaty between the two countries.. Exchangers View Source of Energy A trip to an oil drilling rig south of Trent Tuesday provided 31 Michigan ex- change students in town this week their first oppor- tunity to see how oil, a sub- stance northerners hold dear, is discovered. Story and pictures, Pg. IB. Amusements 8B Bridqe 9D Business Mirror 6C Classified 5-9D Comics 4D Editorials 4A Horoscope 5C Hcspirol Patients 7A Obiluarics 10D Sports 1-3D To Your Gcod Health AC TV Lea 9B TV Scout 9B Women's News 2-4 B London's Market Hits 7-Year Low Brezhnev is understood lo have cautioned Kissinger dur- ing their first meeting Monday against stressing Ihe massive U.S. advantage in missiles carrying multiple warheads. He is reported to have likened such lalk of blackmail. This could explain Kissin- ger's warning at a luncheon Monday lliat "if we attempt to blackmail each there can be no peace in Ihe world. While Kissinger and Brezh- nev turned Tuesday to the Middle East and other prob- lems, aides were trying to un- ravel the knots in the nuclear issue. Kissinger (luring bis stay in Moscow hopes to work out a deal for a treaty limiting the development of missiles carry- ing multiple warheads, Hie irilJVs in which the United States bus a big advantage, while1 balancing off the Sovi- ets' edge in payload capacity- Kissinger evidently lias re- minded Brezhnev that the U.S. govermcnl is fully aware of the implications of the Soviet missile tests conducted last August. The United Stales is reported willing for Ihe Sovi- ets lo do enough testing over the next few years to narrow the MIHV gap. But Kissinger is seeking concessions to off- set the preponderant Soviet advantage in launching pow- er. lirczlinev and Kissinger met again for eight hours on Tues- day. A joint statement said they had "businesslike and constructive" talks on [lie Middle East situation and Ihe fiast-West conferences on Ku- ropcan security and coopera- tion and troop reductions in Central Europe. While Ihey lalked, the Hus- sians arranged a news confer- ence by Dzlierman Gvishiani, deputy chairman of the State Committee for Science and Technology, for the American newsmen accompanied Kissinger to Moscow. Malhias Jr., said they doubted Nixon would want to campaign for them, since they have opposed many of his ma-: jor proposals. An aide for Oregon Sen. nob P a c k w o o d said Packwood doesn't plan tovtsk for Nixon's help. An aide lo Sen. Milton II. Young, R-N.D., gave a sim- ilar answer. An aide for Oregon Sen. Bob Cook of Kentucky said he didn't know whether Cook would be interested in hivitin'g the President. Sen: Edward Gurney, Tt- I'la., declined lo be inler- viowcd. An aide lo Sen. Barry Uoldwaler, said he has made no statement about possible campaign help. Anti-Kidnaping Advice Considered WASHINGTON (AP) The KBI is thinking about offering the public a package of tips on how to avoid being kidnaped. Agency spokesmen said they are considering the project in to numerous requests for advice after the kidnaping of Patricia.Hearst nearly two ago and 11 other ac- tual or threatened kiCirapings since then. Replying to questions, spokesman Tom Coll said Tuesday the project "is still in the talking stage" but could lead to an information kit dis- tributed to schools and DIP. general public. Storms Menace South Texas WEATHER U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Weather Service Weolher Mao. PS. 7A> ABILENE AMD VICINITY 110-mile radius) Clear fj porlly cloudy ar-d Tftursday- Southerly winds al 10 lo 20 mph. High ttxjay in tfie upper Lov lomghl in Iris low Wl. High ThurnJay rieor fa. Kigh enil for 3J hours ending 9 67 end 53. Mlrin and some dale rasl year: 70 ar.d 42. Sunsel foil nitjhl: sunrise loday: Aunscl Icrilhgt: J5Y THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Fog which was blinding in places cloaked broad areas across Texas today as turbu- lent stoniis which buffeted areas near the coast late Tuesday moved out of stale. Motorists were warned about driving hazards as fog dropped visibility to zero in the Austin vicinity. While most, Fair Predicted Through Weekend Clear skies and warm temper- atures are predicted through the weekend, forecasters at the Na- tional Weather Service said Wednesday. The only significant change in area weather is a lack of mois- ture, forecaster Jerry O'Bryant explained. Winds have shifted to a more southwesterly direction and have shul off the How of (Jnlf air. O'BRYANT SAID there is "nothing in sight" through Sun- clay because a high pressure system to the west of Abilene is expected to push an approach- ing cold front lo the east. Tills umbrella effect of the high pressure dome should allow temperatures to rise into the mid 70s to mid 80s through Sun- day, O'Bryant said. of Hie foggy patches plagued East and Central Texas and along the coast, Ihcre were oc- casional spots as far north as Chiidress in the Panhandle. Menacing thunderstorms, packing hail and winds up to 50 miles per hour, chinned through parts of South Tesas and on into the Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana. Streets filled with water for a lime in number of towns. The National Weather Serv- ice reported a tornado was spotted Tuesday afternoon near Robstown. There was no word of damage. State police blamed heavy rain near Falfun-ias for a col- lision of a car and a truck in which Mrs. James Smith of Hebbronville died. Low clouds still blanked the eastern half of the state this morning while the western sections enjoyed a day of fair weather. Aside from a little warming, forecasts promised little change. Temperatures near dawn ranged from 44 degrees al Dalhait in the Panhandle up to SO at JIcAllen in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, with most readings in the 5Cs. Tuesday's top marks went as high as 81 at Wink in Wesl Texas. Cloud-covered Houston was the coolest spot with i maximum of 54. Nation's Business Climbs In February for 2nd Month LONDON (API The Lon- don stock market dropped to a seven-year low today following the Labor government's pre- sentation of a budget raising taxes on corporations and wealthy citizens. The austerity budget, de- signed lo curb inflation and reverse Britain's deficit econo- my, was unveiled in Parlia- ment on Tuesday, and Prime -Minister Harold Wilson sched- uled, a meeting with union bosses today to urge voluntary restraint on wage demands. The .slock market opened calmly bul loward nogn began to drop In what a broker called "a bloodbath." The Fin- iindfi! T'pics Index of lead- ing Industrials fell 9.G points In 283.6 by shortly after noon, falling for the first time below the November 1066 level of 2M.6. Brokers blamed Ihe drop nn higher corporation taxes, high- er income taxes especially on Ihc rich, and the prospect of an added "wealth tax" in a .second budget later in Ihe year. This is expected to tax incomes above Only gold mining shares, a traditional hedge, improved. Wilson's bid for a wage holddnwn by labor unions was a further step to restrain infla- tion which Chancellor of the Exchequer Denis Ilealcy in liis budget message Tuesday said threatens lo "corrupt the whole basis of our society." A WEEK-ENDER WANT AD GETS YOUR MESSAGE TO THE MYERS! 15 WORDS 3 DAYS SAVE SI.90 Additional woids 15' cacK No phone orders Cash in advance Deadline 3 pm Thursday No rcffndi ABIUNI RtPOmR'Hi WASHINGTON (AP) The government reported today that its index of business indi- cators rose solidly in Febru- ary lor the second month in a row, another indication lhal the worst of Ihe nation's cncr- gy-relaled econmic slowdown may he over. The business indicators were up 1.8 per cent in February, following a per cent sain in January, pulling (he over- all index al a record 170.G of the 1967 average of 100. Economists look to the indi- cators index for clues lo fu- ture trends in performance of Ihe economy. The index was off sharply by 2.1 per ccnl in December. In aihlillon In (lie I'ebruary increase in Ihe index, there have been other signs that the nation may avoid a serious re- cession resulting from the energy shortage. Housing starts were up last month for Ihe second month in a row, and unemployment re- mained steady at 5.2 per cent inslcad of rising as some economists had feared. Recent reports have shown that hi- vcslmcnl plans of Ihe ration's business also arc encowaginp; this year. The Commerce Department said six of the eight business indicators increased in Fcbni- aiy, led by industrial materi- als prices.'which would reflect inflationary trends in addition tri rM] growth. Bill also increasing were new orders for durable Roods, contracts and order [or plant and equipment, building per- mits, price-labor cost ratio and average work week, was up to 40.5 hours February from January's 40.2 hours. On the negative side wers stock prices and initial claims for unemployment insurance, which totaled Unem- ployment insurance claims have been climbing sleadily since late last year. The indicators arc subject lo revision al a later date when more information liecomcs available, the gain in the Jan- uary index, reported last month as 2 per ccnl, was re- vised lo 1.2 per cent In tlie- current report.   

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