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Abilene Reporter News: Friday, March 22, 1974 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - March 22, 1974, Abilene, Texas                                porter "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR fOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT Byron 93RD YEAR, NO. 277 PHONE R734271 ABILBNK. TEXAS, 79G04, FRIDAY EVENING. MAHCH 22, PACKS IN FOUR SECTIONS Associated Press By EM .IE HUCKEH Skinny Directories Due to Thin Paper Q. How come our new phone directo- ries live so skinny? Arc we losing pro- pic? Are (here lower yellc-.v pages? Or is il they're using tliiinic'r paper Ihls year? A. Third time's a cliann. The pages arc Ihin as (issue paper tins year because o( ;he papcr shortage. It's definitely not because (if ii decrease in population: tllc alphabetized listings increased from 123 pages lasl yeav In 120, says a spokesman for the telephone company. Q. How many "places" are there on (he school board? How many years ilocs an elected mcmlicr serve? How many niEinbprs arc elected al cadi election time? How often me elections What determines wliich "place" a pro- spective candidate will rim for is il geographical location or his residence, the incumbent board member lie would like to replace, or what? A. Tlio seven school board members serve lerms of six years each. This year we're elccliny three new members, in years we'll elect (wo members, two years -after, that we'll elect two members. It runs 3-2-2- 3-2-2 with elections held every two years, says School Board President C. G. Whillen. Anyone living within the Abilene Indepcn- dcnl'School District who meets the qualifi- cations, can run for any position that's open. Obviously a candidate probably would choose a posit'ion that's unopposed. Other- wise, we'd assume, lie (or she) looks over (he other candidates, runs for the spot he foels he has the best chance of winning. Q. I've been following (he big lo-tlo incr smoking ill.rock concerts in (he. Civic Center aiut there's a simple solu- tion. The time is coming ulicn smoking will become socially unacceptable and I Ihink public opinion is iihonl to Ihc point where we could consider a policy of no smoking for everybody attending any function at (he. Civic Center. 1'Ieasc ask Ihc Civic Center manager nhy he won't jusl lian smoking entirely? A. We asked him. He said, "Since I'm a non-smoker myself. I can appreciate his point of view but I also have to answer to the person who's paying the renl." Civic Center Manager John Chancy says if a group rents the building for a dance, break- fast, luncheon or whatever, and that group doesn't object to its people smoking, he's certainly not in a position to say they can'l. Now there is a no- smoking regulation in the AUDITORIUM because of potential fire hazard and peunle have comnlied with the rule real well, Clv.mey says. Bui as long there's no fire hazard or danger of (lamacc to the building and until legislation prohibits smoking in public buildings. Chancy says he can't nrohibit smoking in general. Al the rock concerts, marijuana was the problem, not smoking in general. To control the illegal stuff, all smoking was banned at rock concerts in the exhibit hall as well as in the auditorium. Q. Is il true that next year they're Coin? lo issue passenger car lags for five years? If il's (me then I'm wonder- ing about personalized plal.-s. Highl now, f pay SIO a year extra (or a per- sonalized Will I slill be required to pay Ihe SIB-each year even though I buy Ihc five year lag? A. To both vour yes. With a few exceptions, Texas vehicle owners will be going lo Ihe five year tags next year. You're one of the exceptions. Personalized plates will still be issued annually and Ihe sad truth is you'll continue lo pay Ihe 510 extra in addition to your annual registration tec. The rest of us will pay the yearly registra- tion fee and receive a lillle lab slicker to pul on the plates to keep them up to dale, says Jerry Palmer, regional supervisor for Molor Vehicle Division of Texas Highway Department. Address questions lo Action Line, Box 30, Abilene. Texas 7DB01. Names will nnl he used but question.? must he signed and addresses given. Please include lel- epliouc numbers if possible. Writer Views Divorce Pace Taylor Countians ore filing for divorce at a rate well above lost year's tor- rid pace. The matter is viewed by staff writer Roy A. Jones II in a 'Between Editions' story on Pp. IB. NEWS INDEX Amusements Business Mirror Bridge 10D Classified 2-9D Comics 98 Editorials 4A Horoscope SB Hospital Palienls 3A Obituaries 9D Socrts 1-4C To Your Good Hcnllri 10B Travel 6-7B TV Loo 7C Women's News 3B Dry Dock at Lake This boat clock at Lake Korl Phantom Hill, normal- The (lock is owned by Mr. and Sirs. .JaUe Klrod of l.of 231, floating in several fed of water, .stands high and and is on lite cast side. (Staff: Photo by John Uesl) dry is a result o[ the ;irea's extended dry period. Lake Levels Lowest Since 65 15v nil.L GOULD Reporter-News Staff Writer Abilenc's three lakes are al their lowesl levels since Iflfio, but the city apparently has enough water on lap to sur- vive even Ihc driest of sum- mers. "We couhl go through the year wilhnul any trouble, even if il didn'l rain another Water Director Rill Wccins predicted Thursday. IVeenis' enthusiastic confi- deuce is prompted by Ihe re- cent hookup wilh Ilubbard Creek Lake as an auxiliary .supply. IF WE MICEI) IT, we can pump in as much as 15 million gallons a day from, Ilubbard, but we probably won'l unless i( doesn't rain between now and he said. Light rains in the immediate area this week have added snme 120 million gallons to Lake Fort Phantom Hill, Lake Abilene and Kirby Lake the sources. Wccms said that the three lakes presently bold about 13.8 billion g a I l.o n s altogether. Armenians consume HU aver- age H, gallons a day, he said. Lake's Water Level Causes Guild to 'Scuttle Its Ship The A b i 1 e n e Philharmonic Guild, which' had plans' for a spccual cruise at l.ylle Lake on Tuesday, has been forced In scuttle ils ship due lo a lack nl Wider. The cruise was lo be in con- junction wilh next week's Con- ference of the Texas Women's Assn. for .Symphony Orchestras. The lack of rain has dropped Ihe lake level to about five feet be- low' Hie spillway, however, ami the cruise was called off. Lytle, a private, lake main- tained by Wesl Texas Utilities Co. for recreational and oilier purposes, is not a part of Ihe city's water supply system. Uul il, like the other Ilirce major Incal lakes, is its level since A spokesman for Ihe guild said Friday that delegates to Ihe conference will be cnlcrUined al a progressive (I tune r parly around Ihe lake in place of llie cruise. The dinner will begin al Ihc home of .Mr. and .Mrs. Sonne Llinbcrson, afler which dele- gates will travel by car In the Stack liplens and then on lo the Hane Travises. The conference Iwgiiis Holi- day with registration al Ihc Mil- ton Inn, Highlights will be a concert .al the Abilene Civic- Center on Monday evening, sev- eral dinner parties and recep- lions and Ihe general business sessions Tuesday and Wednes- day. l.AKl! V 0 R T PHANTOM HILL is now feet below spillway level, while Lake Abi- lene is 7.3 feel below anil Kh'by l.ake is S.7 feel below. The city gels annul !f> per cent of ils water from Pluiulmn, about -l.S per cent from Abi- lene and Ihc remaining .2 cent from Kirby. U'ccrns said that Kirby is purposely kept low in order lo lake floodwater -run-off from llie city. Lytle Lake, located Southeast o? Abilene, is owned by West Texas Clililies Co. and does nnl supply waler to Ihe municipal system, he add- ed. Tl'.e lasl lime Ihe lakes were Ibis low was in April of lilfin, I be water director said. Slill. he doesn't consider the situa- tion critical. "I can remember il drop- ping lo 20 feel below the spill- .said. "That was in We're a lot belter lit! than that." Man Killed While Crossing Street lly OAKY BALDltfDGK Kcuorler-iS'cws Staff Vt'ritcr A service station co-owner and operator was struck and killed by a delivery van early Friday morning while he crossed a stroel afler apparently running out of gas on his way to work. r.obcrl K. Graham, of 657 1C.N. 20th, who was eight days away from his filst birthday, was dead on arrival at Hemli'ick Memorial Hospital's emergency Another Front Aiming at Area Another cold front rushing down from Central Wyoming and the panhandle of Idaho is ex- pected lo enter the Abilene area early Saturday morning, fore- casters at Ihc National Weather Service said Friday. Forecaster Jack Schnabel said al first it was thought Ihe front would miss the Abilene area, but dial its extreme speed caused forecasters to change their minds. The fronl, now causing 40 In 50 mpn winds, behind it, is trav- eling abou I -15 inph, SchnalxM said, but because of Ihe wind pattern is expected to drop tem- peratures only into the mid ,10s. Northern sialcs were report- ing Icmiicralures in Ihe singlc- digil column Friday, Schnabcl said. lie added the frnnl should blow through between 1-2 a.m. Saturday. WEATHER 0 S DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Service (Wcalher Pg. 3A1 ABU ENS ANO VICINITY (It-milt rai- _ Mostly roir through Saturday. icdav. Coder Saturday. Soulhnlv winds 1C fo 10 mph becoming jiorlhcrly 10 to iron lortlpnl. High Today In NIC tCv tovj Icnisnl ift Ihe mid 2Cv Hiah Snlu-tlay in Ihc mid 50s. onfl for 3J hours ending 9 room at -a.m. Friday. Jus- lice of Ihc Peace Silas Clark pronounced him dead at a.m. A partner in Kcgal Home Si Auto, 3901 S. 1st, Graham was reportedly on his way lo work when his pickup truck ran out of gas on N. 1.1th jusl short of Tveadaway, s -a i d Patrolman Kelvin Martin, one of Ihc inves- tigating officers. TIll-A' GRAHAM walked across Treartaway in search of an open gas Million shortly be- fore 7 a.m., which was before daylight. Officer Martin said a white delivery van driven by ,f. Edward Simmons, 47, of IG2G Delano, struck Graham in Ihe 12CII block of North Treailaway while (raveling south on Ihe bou- levard. .Simmons had someone call po- lice and an ambulance while he stayed iit Ihe scene. OHiucrs Don Pence and John Howard ar- rived at about a.m. an.l began administering an oxygon tank rcsuscilalor anil lieavl massage until an Elmwood Chapel ambulance arrived at aboul Cai'l Stewart of Klmwood said (iraham was lying on his back KOJIKRT K. tiHAHAM ]iciic.slrian fntalily ir, the middle of llie street when he arrived. He had suffered head, che.st and leg injuries and multiple lacerations. His head was bleeding. Officers al the scene as well as ambulance allcndants be- lieved the man was killed al- most inslanlly. Sf.M.MOXS. TIIK driver of llie van according lo police reports, is a self-employed salesman who delivers produce lo local cafes, police said. .Simmons did not make his de- liveries Ibis morning lo ilack Kplcn'.s Cafeteria and other points, sending his .son inslead, according lo employes at Mack's. Judge Clark said he will not make an official ruling in the death until lie receives a com- plete report from invest igalinj; officers, but he said l-'riday niorning he will almost certainly rule thai il uas an accidental death. Simmons could not be imme- diately reached for cnmmenl on llie accident. .Meanwhile, officers contacted Mrs. Graham al the family home al fi57 KN .MIIS. Gfl.UIA.irs heart condi- tion caused concern ior a neigh- bor, who arrived shortly afler llie police, and she was silling in the living room wilh Mrs. (Ira- ham while, smother neighbor. Mill in her housecoat, was in llie kitchen trying to telephone Ihc family physician. F u n c r a I arrangements arc pending. Nuclear Breakthrough Eyed 'Ji "net Miat; MM niqhl low sarnf dfllc Ion vfor' '3 sunrise loilay: WASHINGTON (APi -Sec- retary ot Stale Henry Kissin- ger conferred wilh President Nixon loday on his upcoming trip lo Moscow, where he says he will seek a brcaklhrough r lhat could produce a concrete treaty lo limil nuclear weap- ons" by Ihc end of 197-1. Kissinger came to Nixon's Oval Office a day after he told a news conference that pros- peels are reasonably good for (he brcaklhrough. Hut he also cautioned thai relations be- Iwecn the Iwo powers arc passing Ihrnngh, a difficult pe- riod. As photographers recorded the start of their meeting. Nix- on asked Kissinger if all his meetings would be in Moscow. The secretary replied lhat So- viet Leader Leonid Brezhnev has arranged for some, of Ihe sessions lo take place at a government retreat miles from Moscow. "It's like. Camp Kis- singer said. The secretary, who leaves this weekend, said rapid im- provement of nuclear has slowed progress on a treaty. Congress' iinnilling- nes.s lo grant trade benefits lo Ihe Soviet I'nioii.aiid friction in llie Middle I'.nsl also con- tribute lo Ihe difficulty, he .said. And yet, Kissinger absolved Moscow of blame for Syrian clashes with Israel in the (lo- lan Heights and siiid: "Hoth of us have an obligation lo con- tribute lo peace and hnih of us are exchanging ideas on Ihe subject." The I.'niled Slates and Soviet I'iron signed their first nucle- ar weapons in 1072, I'p.striciing defensive .systems and pulling temporary limits on some nffi'ii.sivc "capons. 3 Suspects Surrender, Free Captives lly AIAHK IIHKI) Associated I'ri'ss Writer NlttV VOP.K (Al'i Three accused hank robbers Irving lo break out of (lie Federal House of Detention surren- ilered today and released four captive guards afler winning a promise of amnesty during a night of iirgoiialinns. Using gnus sneaked through an outside window Thursday nighl, Ilic i n in'a I e s had planned :i violent escape, ac- cording lo the warden of the holding faciliiv for federal prisoners in lower .Manhattan. linl they abandoned a break- out after foreseeing failure, Warden Loni.s .1. Gentler (old newsmen .shortly afler (he prsiimers "javc up at 0 a.m. instead, they corralled seven guards, three of whom man- aged In escape. Cuslavc V.'oiss. lawyer for one the inmales, sairt United Stales Atlornev Caul .1. Curran had informed thai Ihe men would mil be iirnsc- ciileil for the escape attempt "as hum as the men surren- dered and the Guards were not iniurod." Curran said the bunk robbery charges would stand. The breakout alleinpl at about p.m. Thursday brought hordes of city police- men and Kill aiTcnls bul- vests anil shnl.vmis. Helicopters hovered over I lie di'tenlion center al Hie Hudson Kivcr i" Ihe sliad- ow of Ihe elevated Wesl Side Highway. A federal iigonl said OIH' who knew what rhev were doing" broke half-mch-lhick glass in a street-level window of ihc officers' mess. The window of (I-inch-square glass bricks, facing West lllli Street, was s in a shed by "someone on the outside thai knew exactly where llie offi- cers' mess the -agent said. Through this window, ac- cording to authorities. Ihe in- mates grabbed (wo handguns and then surprised Ihe guards. They inlo llie mess by breaking a luck, il was report- ed. we gel a belter class of prisoner Hum Ihe type. that wimlil try to pull an es- cape like said a guard who spent the nighl inside Ihe facility. "This is more [ike something thai happens in a city jail." Abilene Man Found Dead In Jail Cell Kenneth Kobhtsnn. 17. son u[ Mrs Hirrtie .Mae Fields or 52-12 Congress, was found bealen lo death will a blunl instrument Thursday niorning in a cell on Ihe fifth lloor of Ihe County jail. Tarranl County sheriff I.ou Kvans said that lie had ques- tioned two of thrcf! prisoners who were m the samp cell when (he killing occurred and would question the Ihird pris- oner Viiilay. Kvans said Unit Robinson had been lighting earlier wilh two of his cellmates. Robinson died of internal in- juries, according lc> County Medical [Cxamincr Dr. Fcliks Ucibijison was in jail follow- ing hiiJiclinenl on an armed robbery charge. AlKltlCAl, KXAMIMCII T. 11. Harris- said hail been involved in a figlil wilh livo oilier jail inmates Tues- day. Kvans said that one of the Ihree men being questioned probably will be accused of administering llie falal Ijlmv.s to liobinson. The body will be taken to Tex.iikana Samrdav morning wliere graveside services will be held al 2 p.m. in a Toxxr- kana Cemelory. lidhinsini was born .Nov. 1, in Texiirkana and is sur- vived by his m her. two brothers anil four sisters. The cell in which Robinson was killed is across the build- ing hum the floor jailer's desk with elevalors and several id slcel and coiicrele walls be- (wcen Ihe jailer's desk and Ihe cell. School Chief Is Leaving Sweetwater Dreniiun Uaves, II. siipcrin- lendcnl of the Swcetwaler In- d e p c n d c n I School District the past three years. Mas an- nounced new supniinteudcnl (if the 1'aris Independent School Ilislnct Thursday nilihl. Daves, chosen by Ihe Pans School Board from among 111 applicants for the job. was announced as new superin- tendent al an emergency meeting of Ihc board Thurs- day. Me will assume Ihe oosl now held by Supl. Tom Lilian in .lune. Lilian -announced his resignation in .latuiaiy to take a job a.s superintendent al M'nodullc effeclive June 1. Conlaclcd in I'aris 1'iiday miiriiina. Daves told The Ho- porlcr-Xews he applied for the Paris posl because il is "a liellcr oopiirlnnily." He poini- ecl out that district is -I-A uhilc Swcetwalcr is :l-A. SWKE'nVATKfl School Board ('resident Jim U'ilks said Friday he has mil re- ceived a Idler of resignali'in from Daves. Daves, however, told The Hriwler-Nows lie had submitted his resignation there Wednesday. Daves joined Ihe Sweolwa- ler public schools in IWil as a h.story teacher and 'assistant fonlhall coach al Sweelwaler Ilich. He became assistant high school principal three years later, serving in thai posilinn five years. lie t.C'camc assistant super- intendent in and in 1071 DIIKNNON D.AVKS lo I'aris schools v.as named supcrinlondenl. lkj is Hit' ciu'ronl president-elect of Ihe Disl. Texas Slate Teachers Assn. Daves holds a bachelor of science degree and a masier of education degree both from llardin-Simmons University. He is currently working on his doctorate in education from Texas University. AS PAULS superintendent, Daves will he responsible f'ir a high school, two middle schools and five eleinenliirics, wilh n total district enroll- ment of The new Paris High School will open this fall. Davos and his wife Molha and daugbler M.uMia, 11, plan in move to I'aris in mid-June.   

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