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Abilene Reporter News: Tuesday, March 12, 1974 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - March 12, 1974, Abilene, Texas                                gpbttene "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT Byron 93RD YEAR. NO. 2C8 PHONE (J73-4271 m ABILENE, TEXAS, 79004, TUESDAY HVKNING. MARCH 12, PAGES IN TMKIOE SUCTIONS Associated 1'rest By ELUE HUCKEH East North Streets Avoid 'Minus' Label Q. I've been wondering samrlhing ever since L moved lo Abilene. Why are the sliTCls here, designated east-north instead of north-eiisl'.' When my father came lo visit me, lie wondered about it (oo. Ilis ccnimenl, "You he-tier gel out of lhal lu'.vn, son. It's all mixed up." A. Yeah, we're all a little crazy here bill then who isn't? Tell your dad we "do have a logical explanation for oiu- strange streets. Take N. lOlh for example. Thai's tlic name of Hie slreel. N. lOlh. The easl-wcst. streets for the inosl part are numbered streets starting from the Texas Pacific Itailroad Iraeks. N. UHh means approxi- mately the lOlh slreel nnrlli of Hie TfcP tracks, while S. lOlh is (lie IQtti slreel sonlli of the railroad. When the I own was original- ly laid out, N. lOtli began at Ihe Ilitrlinglon Northern liaiiroad tracks and worked west. Later some folks decided to build homes cast (if the tracks so the slreel was extended east. Now it wouldn't do al all, to have an address of minus 315 N. 10th. So lo desig- nate Ihe eastern extension of N.-lOlh. tlie casl was lacked on and there yon have it Kasl N. lOlh. Q. One time yon said somclhiiig about using liquid systemic in pecan trees to gel rief of hovers. Later someone asked aliont frnil Ivccs and yon said it could poison the fruit if iiseil in tin1 spring. What will it do to Ihe pecans? A. Nothing. Pecans don't ripen till full. Since Ihe liquid systemic slays within Hie tree only two months, your pecans won't lie contaminated. It's okay to use it on pear and apple trees loo, since Ihey won't maluro until fall. Q. Tlmrber was once a booming coal (own so why isn't it like inosl ghosl towns with rundown buildings, houses, what have yon'.' Where (lid all Ihose buildings go? Were Iliey used for kind- ling? A. The wooden houses were sold and moved away: most of the brick buildings were lorn down. The old pharmacy (which you probably already know) was trans- formed into the Tlmrber Inn which, inciden- tally, is where we got our information. B. P. Gilchrist, who until recently leased and operaled Ihe restaurant, had many con- versations with original Thurherilcs who slopped by his restaurant. Other bits of knowledge on Thurhcr came lo him from oldlimers attending Ihe jmmial'Thuruor re- union. Q. Sly grandmother will he S5 the 2ulh of would lluill her so to gel a birthday card from President Nixon. I've heard it can lie done but tlon'l know how to go abiiiit it. A. We understand Nixon sometimes sends cards acknowledging birthdays to Senior Citizens 80 and over and couples celebrating 51Jlh or higher wedding anniversaries. Write ii couple weeks in advance lo the While House, Washington, D.C. 20500. Include grandmother's name, address and her birth- dale. Or drop a note lo Congressman Uiirle- son's office al Mox 1101 in Abilene. (J. Three or four people asked Action Line, if the Osmonds were coming. Y'all said they'd lie here in a month or (wo. It's been that long auif more. Are they coming? Conlil you reserve lickels for me and could I ialk lo them backstage, offslage, onstage or anywhere? .A. The Osmonds aren't coining lo Abilene anytime soon. Two years ago Coliseum Manager Joe Coolcy had a lentidivc booking bill il fell through and we said so in Action Line several limes. Apparently we just don't have facilities large enough lo hold the Osmonds and all their fans. Address questions lo Action Line, Box 30, Abilene, Texas Names will nol he used lint qneslions must he signed and addresses given. Please, include tel- ephone numbers if possible. Small Business Loans Viewed The SmoN Business Ad- ministration's loans in Abi- lene and how on SBA loan helped a black man to start his own successful business here are- stories by Bill Gould on Pg. IB today. NEWS INDEX Amusemenls 2B Business Mirror AA Bridge 48 ClaSbifred 4-3C Comics 3C Editorials 4A Horoscope 4B Hcsqilal Pcllcnts 3A Obituaries 2A Sporl-, I, 2, 8C To Your Good Hcalih 3A TV Loq 2B TV Seoul 2B Women's News 3B Hussein Visit Seen as Arms Shopping Trip WINDOW-BREAKING ON' INCREASE HERE KiS cases reported so far this year Slnll Pholo Vandals Breaking Out in Abilene tly II Hepoi'lcr-News Staff Writer Young vandals in Abilene have been on a window-break- ing spree thai has caused 1G8 cases lo be reported to the Abilene Police Department since the first of the year. The attacks are more than pranks, Del. Jerry Franklin, said Monday, who was called to handle -12 separate reports of vandalism on Feb. II. The more serious trend is reflected in the number of broken car windows, smashed plate glass panes of businesses and slashed tires, he said. POLICE ItKCOIinS show thai 455 cases of vandalism were reported in Abilene in 1073, about IIS per month com- pared with 5ti per mouth so far this year. Franklin said the breakage is carried out by young people ages 13 lo IS and sometimes older, traveling in groups of two to six on font or in cars between dusk and 3 a.m. The Feb. 11 incident, Frank- lin said, was caused by a group of briys who drove around the city al night shoot- ing out the windows of parked cars with a HB gun. In this one incident, which was repeated on a smaller scale on Feb. 22, police repnrl- ed GO to 70 different cars were hit all or most parked al Ihe curb. "THE MAJOR problem is c a I c h i n g Franklin said. Despite Ihe many re- ports, Franklin said il was "almosl impossible" to cap- ture llic vandals and that "very few arrests" have been made. This difficulty arises. Frank- lin explained, because the crime has no pattern, is car- ried out quickly under cover of darkness, and is accom- plished by no one group or individual. 'the number of persons in- volved, which Franklin said is difficult lo estimate, makes identification virtually impos- sible, he said. "This is getting serious." he added, and pointed out thai a car window can cost anywhere from S5U to The type of vandalism, he said, is more WEATHER U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Nolion.il VJeolher Seivice Mdp, Prj. DA) ABILENE AMD VICINITY (40 mile rodiui) Cleor (Q purlly cloudy ladoy and lonignl. Increaiinq cloudiness wilh s sJlQril chnnrc ol s Wodnes- tlay. Warmer lonighl. Variable winds 5 lo 15 mpr> beccminq soulhcrly tojiinhl. Mich this aflr rnoori near L o.v Inriigrit rp.ii Hiqh Wednesday in Ihe lo.v Proba- bility ol mln ?0 per rcnl Wednesday. High nnri ion for rndlnp 9 a.m.': 20 and High antl low same dole Init year: 78 dnd J7. Sunset last fiiqht" sunsol lonighl: rise Dim Hope Seen For More Rain Forecasters al Ihe National Weather Service siiid Tuesday Ihcy are giving Ihe Abilene area another chance for rain Wednes- day. 1'HOBABIMTV of rain set at 21) per cent as a front, which passed through llic area Sunday, is apparently back- tracking and causing more Ihun- dershowers, forecaster IX W. Kck said. Such showers were reported sonlh of Brownwood Monday along Ihe front line, he "That's why we pnl it in Ihe Kck said of Ihe "slight" chance of rain, lie add- ed thai the rclreating front is nol expected lo pass through Ihe area. Hail rattled off Ihe rooflops and briefly torrential rains soaked parts of Texas again to- day as a stalled cool Ironl set off anolhcr round ot showers and Ihundcrslorms. There also were threats of lo- cal Hooding as the unruly weather concentrated on areas from Central Texas inlo Ihe northeast corner of the slate. Water lilled some slrccts al 'IVague for a lime, police re- ported, Hailstones ranged in from hen eggs al Wills I'oinl down to golf balls al .F.dgewooel. holh easl of Dallas, and mar- bles al Mexia, farlher soulh. Outside the moisture bell .skies also icmained cloudy over Ihe resl of Must and Southeast Texas. II was gener- ally clear over western .sections of the slate. During llic fore par! of tin1 night other storms moved from Southwest Texas into the cen- Iral pan of the stale. Moisture amounts Monday in- cluded Longvicw .117 inch. Tyler' .-1.1. Mineral Wells l.n'fkin .25. Dallas .22. Fort Worth 21) and Waco .Ifj. Temperatures near dawn to- day ranged from 3-1 degrees al Dalharl and 38 at Aniavillo in Ihe I'anhandle up to al Cor- pus Chrisli and al Browns- ville and McAllcn in the ex- treme soulh. Krighl sunshine sent Icm- peralures climbing Monday aflcrnoon in I h c I'anhandle, where some readings were degrees higher lhan the top marks llic day before. Ama- rillo, slill Ihe coolest spot in the stale, recorded a maximum of Alice had Ihe stale's tup mark of 89. serious lhan that of previous years. "IT HUNS ill cycles." Ihe Selective said after likening the window-breaking craze lo llic streaking fad. years ago il svaler bal- loons loilel paper in the trees. or egging someone's house." "ll's just somelhing that's he said. "They (Ihe vandals) don't realize the damage they can do." Franklin recounted an inci- dent a few years ago in which a truck driver was kilted when lie lost control of his rig after a balloon, Ilirown from an overpass, smashed the win- dow of liis cab. Franklin blamed peer pres- sure and a lack of sucial ac- livilics for young people in Abilene for Ihe apparent rise in Ihe number of acts of vio- lence against inanimate jccls. h ey 're jiisl Franklin said. "There's not much lo do in Ihe town socially for the kids. They've seen all Ihe shows and there's no place lo go, nothing to do after 10 p.m." YOUNG riCOI'l.K loday. he said, run in cliques small, clo.sc-knil groups whose mem- bers do things logelher. A young person has mi place else io go if his group disowns him. Franklin said, so, Ihrongh that kind of pressure, he is obliged lo do whatever Ihe others do. liul. even if the causes are known, or suspected, Ihe solu- tion lo Ihe problem seems elu- sive. There is lillle the police or anyone else can do, Frank- lin admitted. Franklin's primary sugges- tion was to park one's car as close lo the house as possible and nol on Ihe slreel. lie urged lo report suspicious groups of persons and ID reporl all incidences of vandalism immediately. A I'KW 1'F.OIM.i: have called in lo rcquesl a "tontine patrol" in their area bill this usually means a drive-by when the officers gel the chance between calls. The police, shoilhanded be- cause1 of flu and vacations, are primarily concerned wilh busi- ness which may be burglar- ized. Franklin said. "We gel inlo residential areas as much as possible." he added. Franklin also said lhal be- cause of the large number of cases of vandalism and Ihoir relatively minor nature. Ihe overworked investigation staff has litlle chance of spending a lot of lime on such cases when (here are unsolved felonies slill on desks. IIv UAKIIY SCUWKII) Associated I'rcss Writer WASHINGTON (AIM President Nixon and Secretary of Stale Henry A. Kissinger met loelay wilh Jordan's King II u s s e i n. who brought lo Washington a military shop- ping list headed by a lequesl for Hawk siiri'ace-lo-air mis- siles. As till' meeting hr'J.m in Ibc President's Oval Office, a White House spokesman said the Middle East situation would be cliscnssed. Hut the king also was ex- pected lo lodge with Nixon a plea for an increase in mili- tary aid. now averaging abeuil RIO million a year. 1o modern- ize Jordan's armed forces. Hussein will resume discus- sions held wilh Kissinger in Amman earlier this month on Jordan's demands for a siza- ble Israeli withdrawal in the Jordan Valley. Hal all sides believe lhal a disengagement wilh Syria musl come first. Jordan begun its weapons hunt last December. 11 has al- ready been rewarded for its moderate course in Ihe Middle Kasl wilh TOW anliUink mis- siles, the American equivalent lo Ihe Suviel Saggers lhal w e> r e used effectively by Fgyptian and Syrian troops againsl Israeli tanks in the October War. Bui Hussein's list is long. II includes squadrons of jets, lanks. armored personnel car- riers, artillery and radar ecjuiument. ami possibly more TOWs. U.S. officials said he had been asked lo winnow il once and is likely I.) be asked again, liefore he goes home the king is expected lo ar- range for additional bargain- ing involving his subordinates. On Thursday, Israeli For- eign Minister Abba Hban will call on Kissinger to begin exchanges" on a Golan Jleigins disengagement wilh Syria. Protestant Figure Slain In Ireland DUBLIN. Ireland (API Irish police, said today they found the body of Sen. Hilly Fox shot through Ihe hwid near Ihe house from which he was kidnaped by armed raid- ers late .Monday. was one of the few Prole-slant members (if the re- public's legislature. Police said they found Fox's body iibntit yards from Hie border with Northern Ireland. Fox was taken -Monday by about a dozen armed men al Ihe farmhouse of friend. Hit-hard in Connly Monaghan. The raiders forced the Coul- son lamily to lie on the lloor. set tire to the house and dragged Fox away. The family managed lo es- cape from the flames. Coulson said lie later heard shots about 5110 yards away as the raiders made off. Until lie moved to the Sen- ate Fox was om> ol only two Proteslanls in the. Daii, the lower house o[ Parliament. Kox, a :in-year-old bachelor, was appointed in the Semite a year ago. He was a member of Prime Minister Liam Cos- grave's Fine Gael Irish parly senior party in the coali- tion ruling Hie republic. Youth Hijacks Jumbo Jet Later Seized on Okinawa SWHP OUT THOSE UNUSED ITEMS SWEEP IN CASH! Wilh A WEEK-ENDER WANT AD 15 WORDS 3 DAYS Save SI 90 Additional woidi'15' each No phone orderi Calh in advance Deadline 3 pm Thufiday No relundi ABILEKCI TOKYO i API A young masked hijacker took over a Japanese jumbti jet wilh 42li persons aboard today, but sev- en hours later police were able to seize him al Nuha air- poi'l on Okinawa. The hijacker, idenlified by police as an 18-year-old Japa- nese, had demanded S55 mil- lion, IJi parachutes and moun- tain-climbing equipment. Ja- pan Air Line officials said. lie look over (he plane, which carried a record num- ber of persons Inr a hijack, tin a domestic fliglu and allowed it to continue ID its original destination of Naha for refuel- ing. Okinawa police- later gave the youth's age Inn declined lo identify him by name because ho is a minor. The youth had operaled alone and there wcie ni> other hijackers, authorities said. lie was seized police dressed as aircraft attendants lo bring food ordered by the hijacker for the plane. Three police in allendaiils uniforms seized llic hijacker in Ihe plrme'Ksiickpil. Officials said police had car- ried food onto Ihe plane twice previously to see how many hijackers were aboard before moving against Hie masked youth. They said that in addition in Ibc SiS million in dollars, llic hijacker had demanded 2110 million yen, the equivalent of about A JA1, spokesman said the hijacker had nol made llnenls about blowing up Ihe plane or oilier violence. Ninety minutes after Ihe plane had landed al Okinawa. Ihe youth allowed passen- gers lo leave Ihe plane. They included 111 women, lluee children and -18 men who were elderly or in frail health. Wilh these passengers gone, 2GJ persons remained captive aboard the plane, equal lo the. previous record hijack load aboard a KI.M jumbo jcl -Se-izcd by Paleslinian guerril- las over Iraq last November. While Ihe hijacker negotiat- ed with airport officials, Ihe plane was parked on the ecu- ler of llic runway, wilh more. than 3IIII police surrounding (lie area. The hijacker reportedly Inle! authorities he would do nolh- inij uiilil Ihe president of Ja- pan Air Lines, Shiztio Asada, arrived on Hie scene. The youth was then seized shorlly after 8 p.m.. just about Ihe lime lhal Asada was due lo arrive al Okinawa. The hijacker's use of "we" and in his notes lo Ihe pilot had suggested al first thai lie had a c c o m p I i c e s aboard the plane. Frisco Strike End Try Fails liy IIICIIAKI) H. SMITH Associated I'ress Writer SAN FKANTISCO (Al1) Ncg.itialiiins lo end a cripp'.ing walkout by city em- ployes broke down early lo- day. wilh city officials an- gered by (he uniun's rci'iisal lo siaff sewage plain-; and halt Ihe dumping of swill inlo San Francisco Hay. "I and the burSi'd of supervi- sors ai'e so morally outraged by Ihi' refusal o] the inii.ai to slop polluting the buy lhal we Iliink f a r i h e r negotiations would be mull-." Mayor Jo- se nil Aliolo declared after holh sides ended a six-hour nu'cling aboul '2 a.m. Unmanned sinci- lasi Fri- day, the city's three ireainu'in plains daily pour an estimated Htll million gallons of law sew- age into Hie hay and I'acific Ocean. a lineal lo pub lie health. lish and wildlife Supervisor Diane Feinslein said the Service F.mphiyes In- ternal innal Union rejected an offer for a .i per cent across- Ihc-biiLird w a g e increase amounting lo million a year up .Si! mil'ion from the cily'.s earlier offer She also noted lhal. beginning July 1, city employes will receive 54 mill'on ni.-rc in health benefits appioved by voters in a bond issue last year. Alioio. who has proven lo be a skillful labor mediator in Ihe past, said he was willing lo meet with either or both sidc.s again al in a.m. loday. How- ever, no formal meeting was scheduled. s p u k e s m a n Jack (You ley, representing snme IIJ.UIK] sirki-rs. said Ihe may- or's offer was "nol very because a mediator, didn't have the power lo selllc the dispuie. II Mas the second lime thai talk.-; have broken down over llic ireaimciil issue, l.asl Saturday, .sessions ended bitterly when the union reject- ed the city's demand thai treatment plants be manned before talks continued. Mrs. Feinstcm said stipev- vistirv personnel would reopen one plaol today, bill il was capable of only annul ouc-fiflh of Ihe city's daily sewage output.   

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