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Abilene Reporter News: Friday, March 1, 1974 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - March 1, 1974, Abilene, Texas                                Ibttem potter WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT -Byron 93RD YEAH, NO. 2G2 PHONE 673-4271 Streaker Arrests Trigger Tech Demonstrators LUBUOCK, Tex. (AP) Campus police arrested two [Hide Mrcnkcrs (luring Ilia niglil at Texas Tech, selling off a demonstration which lasted un- til 2 a.m. today. Between 2011 niul students gathered around Ihe campus police office where (he Iwo men were taken. Tlic dciiioiislralors threw stones iiiul hollies ill i Lnbbnek police and sheriff's deputies who came to Hit; school officers' aid. Campus Police Chief liill Daniels persuaded the demon- strators to disperse after a plea from the editor of Hie school newspaper' was ignored. The Iwti streakers taken In the uibbnck city jail. J Streaking Coed I Loses Boyfriend, Catches a Cold N01IT1IK1KLD, Minn. lAI'l A young college coed who ran mule across ii theater stage during A curtain call says Hii! "streaking" stunt cost her a boyfriend and gained her a cold. Laura Harlon, tfl, says she didn't I'Ciilly need eilher one. "The guy I'd been dating must have been pretty embar- r ;i s s c Hie brown-haired Miss Harlon said Thursday." 1 haven't heard from him since, lint anyone who gets lh.it em- barrassed wouldn't lie worth dating, anyhow." "Streaking" f o n s i s 1 s of dashing across public areas wearing only shoes and a smile. She wore a ski mask, white tennis shoes and red while and blue socks, mure. "I was the first girl It) streak at says .Miss Burton. "And I was the first In streak :i play. I Hot sort of a double notoriety." Laura's debut as a streaker occurred l-Vb. following Ihe final performance of Shake- speare's "Measure for ,Mea- ABILENU, TKXAS. 79004. I'HIDAY 1CVGNING. MAKC11 l', PAGES IN TOUR SUCTIONS Associated 1'rcn The last curtain call was being made by Hie play's leads when Miss f! a r I o n streaked across the stage'and right on outdoors lo another building. She figures '.hat's when slit1, caught her- cold. "The cold weather here is purl of Ihe challenge, of she says. "It's an in- centive lo run fast WHAT, A SHY STIStiAKKH Marlon pecks nrnund Tlic Carlelon rrcslimnu says she had never streaked before bill had talked about it will] friends and decided it would lie exciting. She said Carleton streakers in the past'had al- ways been linen, and she Ihnnghl thai had. She said her friends gave her strong support. She came lo Ihe college Ilie- tree aler that mghl wearing a long coal and sccrcletl herself among Hie props in a dark area. "Misgivings went llirmigli my mind in Hie lasl seconds before Ihe appointed she says. "What would I tell my kid's when I'm lint she cast aside her inhi- bitions, along willi Ihe coal. and made the dash. Top Nixon Are WASHINGTON1 (API For- mer presidential aides II. It. llaldeman and .lolm D. Rhrlicli- man were indicted today by a federal grand jury on charges they tried lo block Hie g.Ue investigation. Also indicted were former Ally. .lohn N'. Mitchell, former While House special counsel Charles Colsun. for- mer Assislanl Ally. On. llob- crl C. Mardian, former presi- dential aide Cordon C. Slra- chan. and ICennelli Park- inson, an .attorney for Presi- dent Nixon's re-eleclion finance committee. In acidilin the grand jury handed a scaled report lo U.S. Dist. Judge .John Sirica, alone with two black suitcases containing evidence. Sirica instructed the panel that it was not dismissed and might be' called on to return in two weeks. The charges were: Khrliclnnan one connl of conspiracy It) (ibslrncl justice. one connl of lying to FBI agents and two counts of lying lo the grand jury or Ihe courl: one count of conspiracy to obstruct justice and three counts of perjury: one connl of con- spiracy in obstruct justice. Ino counts of lyini; lo a grand jury or courl. one comil of perjury and one connl of lying lo agents: Ccilson. Mardian and Park- insmi: one conni each of con- spiracv lo obstruct one count of con- spiracy In obstruct jusiice. and one count of lying lo a grand jurv or court, Kaeh charge carries a max- imum penally of five years in prison and fines ranging from S2.IIGO for perjury to [in- lying lo a grand jury nr courl. Sirica scheduled arraign- ments for March d. a Saturday, when .Mitchell trial in New York on separate charges slsmmini; frm a conlribiilion In President Nixon's 1SJ72 re- election campaign would mil he in session. The 23-membor grand jury was empaneled June 5. 12 clays before Ihe break-in at the headquarters of the Democratic National Commillee. Rain een Clouds Persist lly JOE II iteporler-NCws Staff Witer Culf moislure continues lo flow into Hie Abilene area on southeasterly winds, .rccaslers al the National Weather Service said l-'riday, and if il slays long enough il could be triggered into rain by an upper-level cool from. The moisture, however, will have lo slay more lliaii 72 hours, until lule Sunday or early Mon- day. The con) front, approaching troni contains cooler air by three lo live degrees, and may make, the upper air unsta- ble enough For rain. I'.ul [lie prediction is shrouded in "maybe s." rUIU'.'CA.STKI! JACK Sclma- bel said "if we conlinue lo gel I his drive of moisture we could perhaps start, talking about some shower acliviiy." Southwesterly winds, blowing From 15 I go mpli, originaled in Ihe gulf and have been stead- ily bringing in Ihe moislure since Tnesdav. Schnabel said. The dewpoinl, he explained, a measure, of Ihe amount o[ mois- lure in the air, was degrees Friday morning compared with degrees Wednesday and -W degrees Thursday. Sclmabel said lliis is "perhaps Hie first indication" of a drive of (lull moislure necessary for rain. lie added that a few indicators poinl to gradual changes in llie upper air mass. TIIK I.AYI-'.tt u( moislure has thickened. Schnabel said, despite ils depletion by .southwest winds Thursday. Meanwhile, Hie warming trend continues lo beat up Ihe Abilene area. Temperatures are expect- ed lo rise into the mid 80s Fri- day ami Saturday. Although the layer of moislure is still "laitly Schna- bel said il is enough lo cause early morning cloud cover and partly cloudy skies Friday after- noon. Thursday's high was"   DACV [I lleporler-iN'ew.s Staff Writer Despite Hie praise of Abilene judges and lawyers, some per- sons outside of Taylor County believe the court-appointed at- torney system of representation can be improved by adopting several suggestions. Hill Sleen, as- dean 'of Ithe Nation :i I [Criminal De- Tense College in which st '---linsliuds defense x .iltoineys from all over the na- lion, said prob- ____ e m s in the DACY courl appoint- ed system can be alleviated. "A .lUIHJE usually selects one of his Sleen said, "who serves as an accommodat- ion to Ihe courl. Tl'i1 pay is hardly adequate though most at- torneys try to do a good job. "It's hard lo conjure up a lot of interest In a case like Slccn continued. "The. lawyers are put al a disadvantage, and Ihe lime spent is not ample in most cases." Oilier disadvantages of Hie system poinled oul by the indi- gent clients themselves are Ihe unproductive lime spent'in jail, lale appointment of counsel anil the fact Ihal lawyers must con- due! Iheir own -investigations, into the cases. STKEX SL'GCKS'IET) the fol- lowing reforms: 1. A rosier system handled by one man, called a court co-ordi- nalor, who ranks the lawyers informally as lo Iheir skills and experience in certain types of cases, and suggests appointment lo the dislricl judge. Such a system is in operation in Harris County. Slecu suggest- ed'a rosier of 75 lo 101) lawyers, less for a smaller community. 2. A permanent staff of inves- ligalors. The dislricl attorney lias bis own staff of investiga- tors, il was poinled out. but .the lawyer miisl rely on his own resources, or applv for asis- tancc through the court. 3. I'.arly appointment of an al- lonicy to :i case, even before arraignment. 4. Higher pay as a greakT incentive. 5. personal recognisance Court-Appointed Attorneys, Part 5 bond system whereby indigeiits v.-ho qualify-may go free on their word they will return for I rial. WMATI.ICV. director of Hie courts and legal processes division of the Texas Criminal Justice Council in the governor's office, had high praise for Ihe hitler proposal. T h f personal recognizance Lund plan, lie poinled out. is now incorporated in Texas law, and allows a judge lo release Hie indigent if he passes certain rctniiremcnls. The defendant is then assigned a fee per mil of his bond or SHI, whicli ever is greater, lo. cover Hie cost of the program. Whalley said. Or. Hie fee-may be waived entirely al Hie judge's discretion. "This way." Wlialley said, "a is mil penalised simply [or being arrested." The svslem. W hall e v ex- plained, has a relatively low risk factor. Only 3 or per cent of Ihe defcndanls given lliis benefit abuse it bv skipping out. This compares with a ID lo IS per cent rale on the mure risky cases handled by bond compa- nies, Wlialley said. O.N'CK Hie defendant would not need a mini-appoint- ed attorney because he could work lo pay a hired lawyer, as well as avoiding Hie problems of remaining in jail. Whatley stressed that the pro- gram may be legally implc- mentcd in auv Texas conoiy. Harris. Travis, Tarraut. Dallas and Uexar counlies are ainotig those which employ such a sys- tem. Whalley also suggested a sixth improvmenl attendance by defense lawyers who handle in- digenl clicnls in skills courses offered by the stale bar in con- junction with the Defense Law- yers Assn. Exemptions a Factor in Food Stamps Why ill) some people on food stamps have In pay (nicr as much lor Hie amount of si.mips as another? Snmc pay SIS for worth of slamps, I have lu ph.v for worth of food slamps, and il tliicsn'l sccin fair. A. II depends on Hie number of cxcmp- lions you have. In oilier words, il's based on your net food slump income. It's possible that a person paying less for Ihe stamps has a higher gross income than you, bul thai person lias more deductions. Say two people have an income of a moiiib each. One miglil have high medical expenses, and a child who needs (lay care while mother works. These expenses are deducted from her lola.1 income. She also pels n deduction because site's not collecting welfare but earnini; her own living. K she lias live children, she (inalifics for slill more didiiclioiis, A person can pay anywhere [roni si) lo for food slamps, says l''ood Stamp Supervisor l.inda Kelly. IVhat dors it lake ID declare an inlirsccllpn dangerous enough (o justify installation of a (raffle control light'.' I know people exaggerate bill 1 bcl if jou look a random survey of offices along N. Willis. Icnanls luin'lcl loll yon tlii-re's al leasl wreck n week al N. 3rd and Willis- That's 52 a year anil seems lo indicate a situation. What dues il take lo gel action'.' Do we lielilinn nnr Cily Council? A. The City Traffic decides based on Iraffic volume, visibility problems or high, accident rale. U doesn't warrant a signal based on traffic volume and records at Cily Mall do nol show a single accident al Hie intersection in 1OT. "That's nol saying there isn't a probltr or that wrecks have nol say. Traffic Knginccr Ilud Taylor, "but pcopli either.settled il themselves, left the scene or ji.sl didn't report it in the police. We have one report of an accident this year. II hap- pened last week." Now that he's been alert- ed. Taylor says he'll be watching the inter- section. Who's Ihe mature lady appearing in a great many of (he Coke commer- cials? She sets oul flower pots, arranges things in the foreground, hnslles sdiinil gelling tilings slraiglilrncil around Hie youngsters are singing, "Il's the ree-al thing." She sure lonks familiar. A. We don't know who she is. Raymond Mi-Daniel Jr. al our local Coke bollling company wrote headquarters rnly lo be told thai Ihe lady's name cannot be released. McDanicl doesn't know why they won't lei) and neither do we. Maybi1 an Action Line reader has recognii'.ed her and will give us clue. Q. f 11 tirann, Super U Gcniian- inade camera with capabilities for inter- changing Imscs. 1 liatf a list once of lenses f could buy lo fit It but 1 lost it. Can you find out whicli lenses fit it with or vUllioul an adapter'.' I want a wide anijli; and teleplmlo lens. A. Your beM bet is !i wriie [liaun Xordi America, Division of (lilleile Company. 55 Cambridge Parkway. Cambridge. Mass. 02112. You'll gel quicker results by directing it lo Cnslomer Service. Ask for a lisi of possible interchanging lenses or the name of Ihe nearest dealer. .Q. Htm come nne of Hie high sflionl coaches li.is exempt license plalcs'.' Kroiii vlial is In1 A. Ile'.s exempt from buying plates fur of- ncial school vehicles. Probably he was driv- ing a car that belongs lo Hie school dislricl. Slide, couifty and cilv bnsrs, cars and trucks are exempt, loo. otherwise, you'll have the government paying Ihe govrrn- mcnl. The plates, incidentally, are per nianein. Address questions In Arlion l.inr, Itox 30, Abilene, Texas Names iiol he used but qneslions must he signed and addresses given. I'lease inchiilr trl- epliiinc numbers If possible. Such training, Whalley said, makes allorney.s more qualified lo handle such cases regularly. TIIKIIi: IS alli-rnalive lo Hie court-appointed system I lie public defender system. Lawyers arc appointed full- lime In handle cases involving indigent clieiiis. A limited public defender sys- tem exists in only one Texas connly. Tarran'., vhere four al- lorneys are appointed by the four dislricl coin! judges to serve lor one year. The Four attorneys are paid a flat fee of SI5.GIKI each by Hie county. .hike Conk, a civil lawyer lias been a public defender in Tarrai'l County for the past four said he handles Mid lo 17ii indigent clienls per year, includ- ing ill least one capital case. Cnok. ulio has a civil practice in addition to his dulies as a public defender, said thai al- though judges slill appoinl attor- neys In handle an overload of the. public re- ceive a slighl majority o! them. TIIK TAIillA.NT Coiinh sys- tem. Cook siiid. is ;i measure." uhich developed be- cause Tarnim Cnuim civil law- resented the cut into Ilieir pracliies. The public defender syslcm been For st'M'ral reasons: uncertainty n'icr to Ilin public defender is res- ponsible, Ihe iiioh COM, Hi" dilli- cully in findina ciioiiL'h men who waul the ivluclanci: some defendants lo aci'i-p! sucli coiiu- sel and Ihe suspicion thai Ihe public defender ma> no more ('ffcclive liian a coiirl-appoinli'd allomey. Kvcn Cnuk s.iiil hr problems Hie sysleni. He pomlrd nut lltai in? mu.sl do bis own esligaliuijs ;ind clerical work. The dislricl ;n- iornt'V lias !iis stiill on both uuiiiK Cnok said. In iidililinn lo OKS "mainr problem cif Ihe in- Iween the public defeiitier's of- fife and Ihe district alorncy's office." Cook also complained thai lie is not assigned lo a certain case inilil altrr the IH'i'son has been arraigned. "THAT ITSKTS .Ml-'.." C.iok saiil. "The defendant mav have gone thnrngli a lineup or a lie detector tesl or a confes- sion. All Iheir righls are gone before we gel them. "A luwvei should be avail- able immediately jnsl like he is for a rich person. Reading Ihe i.Miranda i warning (con- cerning coiisliliiiional rights) docsin any Cook asserted. Cook also suggested Ih.il more money would be the best improvement in the court-ap- pointed svslem. lie said allnr- neys should be paid reasona- ble fees comparable lo the Wit pei hour recommended by the Texas liar Assn. offered the analogy llial "wiien i; tinclor Ireals a palicnl on M c d i c a r e. he doe.Mi'i (in il for nothing." A PILOT nrnjecl lo provide free criminal legal services to the punr at a cost lo coun- iv "f V.'il.HW) annually was pre- sented ihe Texas Criminal Jusiice Council m Austin in ISI71. Abilene alluring I'.oij Snro- vik. chairman For Ihe project thawn up by the Abilene Bar Assn. in coujiinclinn uilli Hie Vi'cM Ceiiiriil Texas Council of ilovermiieius. siiid Hie plan :t fedcial granl of The projed. similar lo the Tarranl County system, was scrapped. Snrovik said, be- cause ol a change in federal '-inidi'lim-s would hme tripled Hie COM. Sin'nvik siiid n uas "una- voidable" lh.il expen- ses ivliiiing lo allnrneys rise. If Hie present rale of in- i-reiiSi- 'i'iiylor Counly pay aboal SI.4110 more in court iippniiiiment lees. ing liic tiiinl lo about in 1117-1. WEATHER U.S DEPARTMENT OF COA1WERCE NnlionQl Weather Service [Wcaincr wnp, Ptj. iB) ABILENE AND VICINITY [JO mile nilius) Ftinlv tlcudy or.0 through Sat.inltjv Soufhivcslcrls' v.iiiiK fll iS Id jj rtiiih. ii'TCl Scilurdnv In Ilic mirl SOi. Lev.- lonkilil in llic mill thqli jnJ low lor 24 hemri rndinq 9 U ni. Mi i   

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