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Abilene Reporter News: Saturday, February 23, 1974 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - February 23, 1974, Abilene, Texas                               "WITHOUT OR WITH GJFFENSE.TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS .IT 93RD YEAR, NO. 251 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, TEX., 7fili04, SATURDAY MORNING, FEBRUARY 23, PAGES IN POUR SECTIONS Associated Press Gas-Crippled States to Get Substantial Aid WASHINGTON' (AP) was added (o (lie systems and to CO million increased to million now increased to 1C. 2 York 402 million, plus 8 federal Energy, office ordered increused gasoline supplies totaling. over 32G million gallons for February to 25 states and the District ol Columbia on Friday night. This total increase included previous' increases of 8C.72 million gallons and therefore represented an additional in- -creased totaling 239.75 all others received further increases.-. Energy chief William K. Simon told reporters the new gasoline should bogin flowing lo service stations very quickly, in some cases immediatc-s ly, and should alleviate the long lines at service stations' which have plagued equalization of gasoline supplies in March and the following months. Here is the lisl of increases issued Friday night by the FEO comparing each state's basic available supply for February, and ils previous increase and Friday's revision: Alabama, basic supply Connecticut 81.3 million, plus 1.75 million now increased to S.8 million. Delaware 20.3 million, plus now increased lo 2 million. District nf Columbia 16.C million, plus now increased to 1.7 million. Indiana 166.4 Million, plus 3.33 million now increased to 16.6 million. Kentucky million, plus 2.1 million now increased to 10.4 million. Maine 311 million, plus now increased to 3.4 'million. Maryland 110.1 million, 78.7 million, plus 1.57 million iiow increased lo 7.9 million. Missouri million, plus 3.1 million now increased lo 15.5 million. Nevada 19.2 million, plus 9GO.OUO now increased to 1.92 million. New Hampshire 19.C million, plus now increased now increased to 40.9 million. North Carolina 171.9 million, plus 3.42 million now increased to 17.2 million. Oregon 67.7 million, plus 3.39 million now increased lo C.73 million. Pennsylvania 305.3 million, plus fi.ll million now increased lo 30.5 million. Most of the slates had areas. Simon also said the plus 5.2-1 now increased to 2812 million, plus 5.88 million now increased million now increased to 11 million. Xew Jersey 212.4 Island 29.3 million, viously Itewi assigned -Ofiice was Massachusetts 1CG.2 10.62 million now INCREASES, es in their supplies, but all stales lo improve re- Illinois 313.0 million, 3.2! million now lo 21.24 12A. Col. 3 They Says Freed Editor Diggin In Lisa Swanson, left, of Breckenridge.and Ronnie Blakley of McAllen, right, combine with II. L. (Boss) Smith of Jacksborp to turn a shovel of dirt during the ground- breaking cevempnics Friday for million 4-H Center on Lake Brownwood. iMiss Swanson is vice chairman and Blakley is chairman of the Texas 4-H Council. Smith is the first person to enter Texas 4-11, doing so in 1908 in Jacksboro. (Staff Photo by Don Blakley) 4-H Leaders Break Ground For Lake Brownwood Center By JAMES BOYETT Reporter-News Staff Writer .BROWNWOOD Texas 4-H leaders from throughout' the slate Friday gathered in Brovvmvood for Ihe ground- breaking for a million 4-H Center on Lake Brownwood. The center is being built on a scenic 78-acre. peninsula ovcilooking Like Brownwood. with Herman Bennett Co. of Brownwood in charge of con- struction. THE HAY'S activities began under cover at Chisholm's Restaurant i n Hrownwond. The. dignitaries were wel- comed lo Brownwood and Drown County by Mayor W. T. Harlow and County Judge James Bunnell. T. Louis Austin .Jr., chair- man of the Texas 4-H Founda- tion, acted as master of cere- monies for the event. Dr. H. 0. Kunkel, dean of agriculture at Texas Ai-M University, commended the 4- 11 for ''intensive efforts lo as- sist with the 4-H Center" and for generating statewide inler- es! in the project. Views of what the center will mean were presented by Ronnie Blakley of McAllen, chairman of the Texas Council; Mrs. Floyd Terrell of Hale County, 4-H adult leader; and Dr. John K. Hutchison, director, Texas Agricultural Extension Service at College Stalioa. Blaklcy.said the center'will give 4-lf a place to hold coun- ty, district arid "'state leader- ship workshops aifil and a .place where the 1 H members can gather and u-nrk toward common goal. m.AKf.EY THANKED the hoard for ils leadership and support in obtaining the new' 4-H Center. Mrs. Terrell said the center will provide a place for n re- treat for adult leaders throughout the state and a place where leaders can dis- cuss problems and solutions. "A good leader doesn't devel- op in Mrs. Terrell said. Hutchison said he simply SceCEXTKB, l'g..m, Col. 4 By KIl.Ui: HKOW.V Associated I'rcss Writer ATLANTA, Ga. (AP) At- lanta Constitution Editor Reg Murphy, ransomed by his newspaper for' re- turned home unharmed Friday night and said he .was kid- naped by people who say they want to "straighten .out Hie damn liberal press and then straighten out our govern- ment." Just another guy, 1'g. 12A Murphy had been kidnaped Wednesday-night by a-group which called itself the "Amcri- can Revolutionary a previously uniieard-of right wing extremist organization. The 40-year-old editor said his abduclors included four men and a woman. He said he was forced lo wear tape over his eyes_and kept bound and locked in the trunk of a ear much of the nearly 50 hours he was held captive. "It is important for them lo know they didn't win a big Murphy (old a crowd of about 200 newsmen and neighbors who gathered on Ihe of Iiis livo-stoiy brick house to welcome him home. "They frightened me very badly. They frightened my family." Jlurpliy said, starid- -ing with his arms around his wife and two teen-age daugh- ters. Less than three hours ear- lier, Atlanta Constilution Man- aging Editor Jim Minter dropped the ransom money at the end of a highway which slops in a lonely, sparsely in- habited area about 30 miles north of Atlanta. When Murphy returned home, he spoke briefly with newsmen outside, then went inside for a shower. He reap- peared still unshaven and wearing a dark blue raincoat. His wife, Virginia had tears in her eyes. "I don't have any kind of Murphy said. "I have kind words for my wife, who they tell me is a brave human being." Then Murphy discussed his kidnapers. "About Ihe American Revo- lutionary he said. don't know enough to tell you all the details. II is a group of 223 members and six colonels who operalc throughout the United Stales. They are com- Additional Million of Free Food Conditionally Pledged HILLSBOROUGH, Calif. (AP) An additional mil- lion in free food lo the needy; in California was pledged on Friday by the Hearst Corp. on the condition that Patricia Hearst is first released un- banned by her terrorist kid- napers. The pledge, issued al an af- ternoon news conference by. San Francisco Examiner pub- lisher Charles Gould, conclud- ed with this statement: "No other funds will be committed by the corporation or (Hearst) foundation under any circum- stances." As Gould spoke, a million program set up by father to feed the poor.begait; handing out fresh meat, milk and produce in four California cities. The food distribution was slightly delayed in Oak- land, and was temporarily suspended when a few persons in a crowd estimated at began throwing milk cartons. Patricia's father, Randolph A. Hearst, introduced Gould to a news conference after say- ing-the demand by the Syra- bionese Liberation Army for the extra'SI million in free food "is far beyond my finan- cial capabilily.'Thereforc, Ihe iuatler is now out of my hands." said the Hearst Corp. .V prepared to.contribute to -.'V'.reopte.in Need million lor a food distribution program for the poor and needy, prov- ided Patricia Hearst is re- leased unharmed." Gould said million would beprovided "immediately upon her release and SI mil- lion will be conlribuled in Jan- uary 1975. This January pay- ment will be evidenced by a binding agreement with Peo- ple in Need." Hearst, who is editor of Ihe family-owned Examiner, had hoped the million program he announced would satisfy the demands of his 20-year-old daughter's kidnapers.' But on Sec GIVEAWAY, 1'g. 1'2 A, Col. S Reunited with family Atlanta Constitution Editor Reg Jlurphy and his family address newsmen and friends outside his home Friday night shortly after his release by kidnapers. From the left are Murphy, his daughters, Karen. 17, and Susan, 12, and his wife, Virginia. (AP Wirephoto) said Special Agent Richard Hamilton. "And we have no further comment at this time." After speaking al his home, .Murphy departed with FBI agents, apparently to brief them on his experiences. milled lo the overthrow nf what they called tiie federal government. tell me that all the American government is cor- rupt, Hie federal government, siale and local government. ask me if I'm sure of the authenticity of this. The answer is no. 1 don't know. 1 don'l have any of know- ing. I never 'heard of them before." The FBI said ihere'were no arrests in the case. "Our efforts so far have been directed (award gelling Mr. .Murphy back H-SU Budget Hike Okayed; Trustees Boost Tuition Hai din-Simmons University trustee.? Friday approved a budget increase of 8.3 per cent and raised tuition Irom lo a semester hcmr. The c 11 r r c n t budget of was increased lo Truslees also voted lo elimi- nate the SS aclivisv fee which has been charged each semester in the past lo all sin- rienls taking nine hours or more nf course work, ami lo replace it with a general fee of per semester hour for all students. There will be no changes in other fees. "WE ABE still very much in line with what other col- leges arc doing." Troy Amies of Uttiefield, chairman of the board's Budget Commillce, assured the trustees. H-SU President Dr. Kin in Skiles. in explaining ihr ne- cessity for both the budget and tuition increases, said Ihnl "universities are not cxemp! inn the consequences of the inflationary movements in the economy." "The extremely high in- creases in Ihe cost of gomls and services iiius.t be wilii additional be said. "While larger endowment income and increased sup- port through unrestricted gifis I'g. 2A ure of great assistance In us, we find it necessary to in- crease tuition to the "point where >t will be on a par with other local colleges." He added that the university will continue lo work with ail .students to design suitable plans of financial aid. "In addition to all programs of aid to students as funded bv federal and stale governmen- tal aywicie.s, this noiv budget includes almost in university scholarships and he said. HI' NOTED that 57.2 per cem of the budget increase will bring "substantial in- creases" in salaries on the campus. "These increases will be See H-SU I'KOFS, i'g. I2A. Col. 1 Inside Today Farah Strike Pad Rumored A report that Farah Manu- focturing Co. and cloth- jng workers had reached agreement to end a two- year strike is strengthen- ed by the company and union representatives Pg. I2A. Barbara Ann Allen becomes the U.S. Navy's first v-c- man aviotor in wing-pin- ing ceremonies at Corpus Chrish Naval Air Station whore she completed sev- eral months of flight training. Pg. 8A. If happiness is hoving a fall tank of gasoline, there are a lot of unhappy mo- torists in the Lower Rio Grande Valley. Pg. IB. Amusements 58 AUrologv 12C Bridqs UC Ctiurch Newi C 
                            

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