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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: February 16, 1974 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - February 16, 1974, Abilene, Texas                               "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TOTRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT SATURDAY M Associated Press (ff) The Purple Plum Eater Fights Back r. Va. Twelve-year-old mother thinks he's "pU tra- zy." And he is, enough lo be the unofficial plum-eaiiii" champion of noanoko's Mid- den Valley Intermediate School. When Ihe cafeteria recently served plums, he gulped down his portion. This prompted mends and. acquaintances to push Ihcir plums in his direc- tion. After Ihe donations ended, a coiiiii showed lhat Danny had eaten 37 canned plums. This gel his picture in the school newspaper and sparked a run on the cafeteria's plums with various challengers Irying lo break Danny's re- cord. One contender knocked Dan- ny from his throne by eating plums. Then another pupil came along and downed 5J. His pride at stake and with a will of iron and matching digestive system Danny went into training to win back the title. The training was simple. He just skipped the. main fare when his specialty was served again this week. To the roar of the crowds, Die purple plum eater began one, three Excitement mounted; 21, '2, 23 37, 38, .19 cheers, hur- rahs, 52, 53, 54 and finallv: 70! WTU Files Suit On Lone Star Gas in Pact Afterwards, the victorious champ commented: I don" love plums that much. 1 like 'em a little. But f don't love 'cm. I didn't get sick or any- thing but my mother is going lo kill mo." According to Danny, his mother, Mrs. Jioberl.A.'Willis, gave him a warning about possible gastronomic difficul- ties. She "says it could dam- age my biology or some- he said. Panhandle Quake Shakes 4 States fly 'IUK PIIKSS An earthquake shook parts of Texas, Oklahoma and Kan- sas Kriclay afternoon, and three brief earth tremors were felt in the southern half of Ar- kansas Friday night. inju- ries were reported in any of the areas. The Arkansas tremors, rat- ed at 3.8 on the Richler scale at -St. Louis University, were fell in Little Mock and several, other communities about C p.m. The earthquake was cen- tered in tlie Panhandle near f'crryton, Tex. It "shook the said Mrs. Richard Burke of Perry- ton. The United Slates Ceologi- U.vWLL GOULD Hcporfer-iS'ews Staff Writer West Texas' Utilities' Abilene has filed suit hero against Lone Star Gas Co.: al- leging that a 1059 contract be- tween the two utilities is bc-ing illegally terminated "by Lone Star to years before its cxm' ration date. The suit, filed.Thursday af- ternoon in lOHh District Court by Abilene attorneys Stanley P. Wilson and Robert H. Al- vis, seeks to hold Lone Star to a Dee. 15, 1959'. contract .it Inside Toddy Big Board Breaks Slump The stock market broke out of its recent lethargy Fri- doy lo post its best gain in almost a month. Pg. DC A federal judge says he hopes President Nixon and Watergate prosecu- tor Leon Joworski will stop discussing whether JohnW. Dean 111 told the truth about Watergate. Pg. 9A. Julie Nixon Eisenhower was reported usual joviol by o doctor friend who visited her Friday evening, 24 hours after surgery for removal of a benign ovar- ian cyst. Pg. 12A. Wholesale prices rose 3.1 per cent lost month, the second largest monthly increose on record, the government reports. Pg. 11C. 7C Astrology 8A Bridge BE Church Nc-i Classified .'.....I..... 1-6D Editoriolt 4A Four Markets Obiluoriet 2A Oil IDA Sports 1-5C Today m History 8B TV Lo................. 6C TV Sceut................6C Women's Ncwi....'...... Dispute signed with WTU. AS: I'UINTOT, WTU al- leges lhat tile 'contract obli- gates Lone Star to deliver "an adequate supply of natural gas lo meet the fuel requirements for the operation'' of seven WTU-. electrical generating, planls in' 'Abilene and else- where in West Texas. Further, the suit maintains Ilia: the- agreement was to continue from midnight Dec 31. I960 to midnight, Dec. 31 1031, and that WTU has com-, plied :with all of its contrac- tual obligations as set forth in the agreement. plaintiff al- leges, Lone Star has since no- tified WTU that the contract is lo be terminated as of mid- night, Dec. 31, 1374. The suit Ihen describes Lone Star's reasons for ending Ihe contract as "wrongful and without justification in cither fact or law." and alleges that the expressed intention of end- ing the contract "constitutes a threat that unless the plaintiff (WTU) is willing to negotiate a new contract the defendant Stan will make no fur- ther de-liveries of gas. Rafter Dec, 31, 197-1." WTU ALSO contends in Ihe suit that .the ter- mination notice was delivered "with full knowledge. .that the natural gas which is the subject matter of the contract in question is the- principal, if not the sole, source of a prac- tical fuel supply" for WTU's generating plants. Ending (he contract prema- turely would be "againsl Ihe public WTU alleges, maintaining also in Ihe suit that Star "has steadfast- ly and refused to reconsider its position." Although no specific sum is mentioned in the suit, WTU contends that Lore Star's "wrongful and unjustified acts, tin-cats and attempted forfeiture" have resulted in "substantial cosls and dam- ages." Sought in Ihe suit by WTU arc- a court order holding Lone Star lo the current contract, enjoining the gas company from selling Ihe gas in ques- Scc SUIT. IU. Col. 3 Pow wow at McMurry A group of high school students at Student Weekend discusses a McMurry College publication with the reign- ing Chief McMurry, Sici Fowler, on the second floor balcony of Raclford Student Life Center on Friday. They are, from left, Dean Tumliull, Cooper High seiii- or and son of Dr. and. Mrs. Marshall Tiinilnill of !249 Ilollis; senior Fowler of Levelland; Debbye and Pattye Smith High, 1 daughters of Mr. ami Mrs. C. Vf. Smith of Brailshaw. Weekenders will talk to McMum- facul- ty early Salurday, then see a basketball game and a'ttencl a tlance afterwards, (Photo bv .Billy Adamsi 'Positive' ID Now Keys Check Policy cal Survey said some walls were cracked in Perryton but no major damage was report- ed. The survey said the quake was located between Perryton and Horger, Tex. The seismo- graph center at Boulder, Colo., said the center was 10 miles south of Perrylon. II also was fell in Spear- man, Pampa and liorger and surrounding Texas towns, and in Guymon, Goodwill and Hatdesty, Okla., and Liberal, Kan. The Hichter scale is a mea- sure of ground motion record-' wl on a seismograph. Every increase of one number means a 10-fold increase in magni- tude. A.quake with a reading of four can cause moderate damage and one of -five con- siderable damage. A man in Beaver, Okla., said the tremor caused dishes to rattle in his home and also resulted in a few minor crack in the walls. "We heard a sort of rum- bling and felt il for a lev sec- said George Kiffe, a resident of Baker, Okla. Two-foot-lhick rock walls in the county jail at Beaver, Okla., were shaken, Deputy Tom Kimber said. "The jail is in .a basement and it shook the dickens out of things dmin said. "f was down there with anoth- tr.officer.anil-we-both Felt it: plenty." "f knew darn well it was an earthquake 'because it even rattled my false teeth." said John Rust of nearby Borger in tile Texas Panhandle Friday. Rust's .teeth survived the jolt as did the mostly agricul- tur.il and oil area. ''We thought it was another said a resident of Eorser, a city where the last earthquake was fell, seven years ago. .N'o injuries were reported. "11 shook Cie said lira. Richard liurke of Perry- ton. Officials of the Phillips Pe- (rotcum Co.. installations at Baker said also that vibrations from ihe quake set off some of their electrical equipment that automatically shut off some' valves. Xo damage was re- ported. By STEVK MOXK Hcuorler-News Military I'dttor "I never knew lhat such a few words could cause such a lot of confusion.'1 That was tiie reaction nf Disl. Ally, lid Paynlcr after a Friday afternoon meeting with two local bankers, a Chamber of Commerce and Belter ness Ifureati official concern- ing Ihe new policies nf his of- fice regarding check swindling cases. The confusion began when f'aynter's office issued a set of policies on which check cas- es they would take in light of the new penal code that wont into effect '.fan. I. THAT POLICY stated that for the OA's office to take a check swindling case, a "valid Texas drivers licence identifi- cation of the maker must be noted on the check unless the person taking the check per- sonally knows the maker, no check with Social Sccurilv numbers, Air Force number, or out of state drivers license will be accepted." After Hie meeting between P a y n I e r; Oliver Howard, chairman of the board of Citi- zen's National Bank; Waller Johnson, president of Kirst Winters Honors Two Men of Year Funding of Agnew's Secret Service Protection Cut Off WASHINGTON (AP) The Central Accounting Office notified Die Treasury Depart- ment Friday that it would not allow any more payments for S :cret Service agents assigned to former Vice President Spiro T. Agnew after Sunday. In a teller lo Treasury Se- cretary George P. Shultz, Comptroller General Elmer B. Staats said the payments for the agents were not authorized under any law. Agnew left for a vacation in Pnlm Springs, Calif., earlier in tho week with an escort of agents estimated at between 12 and 21 by a congressional critic of Ihe practice, licp. John E. Moss, IX'alif. Moss has been asking Staats for several weeks in lake ac- tion against the continued pay- ment of government funds for Agnew's agents. The GAO has final authority over government lures. If any paymenls are made for the agents assigned to Agnew after .Sunday the dis- bursing officer in the Treasury Deparlmcnl who makes them could be held personally res- ponsible for refunding the moi.ey. However, a GAO spokes- man, Holanrt Sawyer, said that if the Treasury Depart- ment refuses lo obey Ihe or- der, (he GAG's only recourse would he to ask the .luslice Dcpailmenl to feck compli- ance through Ihe courts. According to Sawyer, Ihc three-page Icltcr was sent by messenger to liie Treasury Department. Sawyer said Ihe letter con- cluded that "appropriation for the operations of the Secret Service arc not available to pay Ihe costs of furnishing Se- cret Seivicc protection to for- mer Vice President Agnew. Therefore, future paymenls made for such purpose will be disallowed by our office." Agnew has not been seen publicly in Palm Springs, nor have his Secret Service agents. Newsmen have not been able to spot Agnew or agents from outside the estate of singer Frank S i n at r a, where Agncw is believed slay- ing. By JAMKS HOYKTT UcportfT-N'CM.s Slate Kditor WINTERS Winters sot two for the price of one Fri- day night. The town usually honors one man as "Man nf the Year." but this year Ihe decision was too hard and Ihc committee selected two of them. Boiii men. Griffin and Hal Dry. are employes of the Wallace Hurry Corp. in Win- ters. The company manufac- turers grills and louvers for heating and cooling vents. Griffin is comptroller of the company and Dry is general manager and vice president of Wallace Murry Corp. Both have held various re- sponsible positions in the Win- ters Chamber of Commerce. Dry is currently a member of the City Council and Griffin is president of the Country Club. Dry was born and reared in Winter s, whereas Griffin moved to Winters in 1970. Speaker at the event Friday was Kd Jackson, director of student recruitment at llar- din-Simmons University in Ab- ilene. Jackson encouraged Ihe cjrmip to line several weds from the patch which will help the town to grow and prosper. The first weed in his patch was thai of indecision, lie said decisions have to he met head- on. Second, was the weed of in- difference, lie said people have to work harder than "just enough lo get by." Doubt was another weed. "If you say doiibi we can do that' then I'll guarantee you can't do il." National Hank; .loe Felton of the Bctlc.r business liiireau: and Jack Gressett. general manager of the Chimber of Commerce, a clarification nf lhal policy was issued. The provision of the policy .quoted above was -altered lo read: -Any means of the iden- tification that satisfies the in- dividual merchant and will allow POSITIVE idcnlificalion will be acceptable by this of- fice." Paynler also released the following statement regarding the new policy: "Identification, p u s i t i v e identification, is the sinjili' most important feature in ;ii- ccptancf of checks by this of- fice. and that responsibility, by necessity, must ivst on tlie person who takes tin- check. Proper identification c.m he had from a number of snuiv- Any method of proper identification will bo accepta- ble. This office .ull rdy and must on you, the See CHOICE. 1's. cm. IF YOU SHOULD FAIL TO RECEIVE YOUR REPORTER-NEWS PLEASE CALL 673-4271 DURING THESE TIMES _ WEEKDAYS: from lo A.M. and to P.M. SATURDAY, SUNDAY, HOLIDAYS: from lo A.M. and we will deliver a copy. Afler these listed times we do not maintain ct delivery teivice. OUJS1DE ABILENE CAU YOUR IOCAI DISTRIEUIOS Station Owners Threaten More Protest Shutdowns By THV: AssoriAiiai VHKSS More protest shutdowns were threatened by service station owners Friday ric-spHe efforts by the Federal Energy Office to ease the dealers' an- ger over short supplies and new regulations. In the area around Norfolk, Va.. kindreds of stations ac- tually did close down in whal owners said wculrt he a four- day strike, Tile protc.sl played havoc wilh area motorists and prompted cily officials to ask the governor to declare a stale of emergency. Dealers in California. Washington. Ore- gon. Oklahoma and elsewhere threatened shutdowns if feder- al officials did not act on their complaints. The demands var- ied, but prime among them more gasoline, pel-mis- sion to chaise higher prices and sit end to the outer ban- ning preferential treatment tor regular customers. In Washington, ihe KKO sought to calm the dealers by lolling thc-m the three-day-old 1'iile ajjaifis! favoring regular would mi! ronllir-i with si-tie rules or cmmucr- cial conliiUk. Ch.uliw Binsu-it, cxciii'.ixe diivcinr of the National Con- gress n; I'elroieum Htfaileis, dealers were, "jumpim; straight up .'.mi down" in an- vjor ;U liio V'KO   

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