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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - February 15, 1974, Abilene, Texas                                gfetlcne Reporter "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT Byron flSRD YEAK, NO. .243 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79G04, FRIDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 15, PAGES IN FOUR SECTIONS Associated Press Teachers Here to Have Political Punch By BLUE RUCKER Goldwater's Speech Closed to Public Senator Goldwaler was al Dyess late in he's a person or national slalui-e, his speech al a social function must surely have reflected his ideas anrf feelings relative to (he slate nr our nation ami ils current affairs. I have seen no report'of this speech. I Jiave seen nolhing In'yonr paper except .'a picture under which was an announce- .incut he had been here. Why? A. Goldwaler accepted the invitation to' speak at the "dining out" on Hie condition he would npl be quoted or interviewed. Tlie formal dinner for officers and their wives was a private military function, closed to the press. Our editor was invited lo attend, with the understanding lie would not report the speech. Q. My wife and I are planning a Irip (o Columbus, Ga., March 1. We'll lie (ravelins Ihrongh Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama. Can you find out torus If gas stations on Interstate 20 anil Route SO irlll lie open on Sunday, March .1? We'll be driving inoslly en Saturday and Sunday. A. .Why don't you ask something easy, like ''how many.nails were in Noah's Gas station owners'are temperamental types nowadays, changing prices and operating hours daily. Only The Shadow knows who will he open March 3.on Route 80. We can say that your chances normally are better in the early part of the month since gas is al- located monllily don't count on it. Looking for gas on Sunday has put adven- ture back inlo traveling. Good luck! Q T have a suggestion for the lady who's still getting bills from the book ulub.for hooks she's already returned. II worked for me; I've-lost count of the number of tellers I've written anrt tin1, .cards received' from a book company acknowledging my cancellation. But sliil the hills kept coming. After a year and it half of hot corre- spondence, 1 got fed up. I called the operator for (he company's phont num- ber and lo arrd behold It had a (oil free number. 1 believe I talked lo the Cus- tomer Service Representative. Any- way, he said, "I'll sec thai it's cancelled immediately, Ignore any further hills." This was three months ago, I've 'had. since the phone call. A. Good idea. Simple as it is, we'd never thought of it: If it worked for you, it's sure worth a try. .We'll pass il'along to our frustrated reader. Q. I, a nervous expectant father, have heard about all Itic classes on natural childbirth hii( my wife beard ahoul a class in Lnbliock that Is sort of in be- tween. It exp'Mns what lo expect, in a normal delivery wllh the mother getting (Iic'spiual ana regular treatment In de- livery. Docs Ihe Key City have anything lo match It? A. (t does now. A call to Ollie Lena Olscn Ited Cross office got enthusiastic response and a class is now forming. Give Miss Olscn a ring al 677-2622. If four other couples call too, you're in business. She thinks 10 is enough lo get Ihe thing going. The class, to be taught by a Registered Nurse, will What lo cxpccl dur- ing labor and delivery, how to care for Ihe new arrival, possibly even a tour of the OB Ward at the hospital. Sunday, Feb. 5 on Channel 3, the Bapflst Church showed a Him on Hie Holy Land. I'd like (o have a copy of that program hut I failed to get the address where lo wrile for one. Can you gel H for me? A A video taped copy of lhal program will cost you about Surely you don't want'that. Assuming you mean a folder or brochure about the program, write Southern Baptist Convention, G350 West Freeway, Fort Worth 76116. Address 'questions lo Aclion Line, Box HO, Abilene, Texas WW. Names will not be used but must lie signed and addresses given. I'lcasc Include tcl- ANN KLOUES Reporter-News'Starr-Writer. A lobby regulation bill passed by Ihe legislature last fall has led Texas teachers lo organize a statewide political action arm to be active in this year's clcc lions. The first statewide group in eluding all educators to enlei tile political ,tne 'Texas Educators Political Action Cpun cil will serve as' the political arm of the Texas State Teachers Assn. but will operate and-be financed- inde pendently. Organized this 'nioiilh in Aus tin, Hie TEPAC board of Irus tees' includes one educator from eacli of Iho 31 stale senatorial districts, one retired teacher, a student member of the TSTA legislative, committee plus the three TSTA officers. Louise Daniel of Aniarillo is chairman. FRED STIRMAN. Jit., data processing teacher at Abilene Woman Receives Church Plaque Insight is, probobly best understood in o simple form, and Mrs. Pearl Boles McDonald, honored Sunday for her 50-year service to the Bethel African Metho- dist Episcopal Church, had several things to say about her simple philosophy of re- ligion and life and general in a story on Pg. 1-B. Amusements............ 9C Bridge-'.......'..-....... 8D Business Mirror 8D .Clossifiod.............. 1-7D 7B Editorials 4A Horoscope 7C Pdticnls 6B Objluories 70 Sports I-5C To Your Gccd Hcodh......6A Trcvcl News............. 8C TV Loq 9C TV Scaut 9C Women's News FIIEI) STIRMAN teachers need 'voice' High, was named board mem- ber from Dist. 21 years ago, very few teachers were involved in lics al all cither iu'suuportiiif! candidates or-taking, stands. In order In have professional influ- ence, we have lo let oLtr opin- ions be Stirman said. Stirnian, presidenl-clcct of the A b 11 e n e Classroom Teachers formation of TKI'AC was made necessary by a lobby regulation law which went into cffccl in Oclober. "The recent says non- profit tax-exempt organisations don'l have the rijjhi lo lie said. Jewell Harris, TSTA' rcprc- sciilalive for tlie Abilene area, clarified Hie law. "It says you cannot use stale dues for lobby- ing. That means yon can't even take a senator oul lo she remarked. TEPAC is able to tnlcr 'the political scene because it will be supported solely by voluntary contributions of TSTA members and not by required dues. STATED PUni'OSK of the mulli-purlisaii organization is lo advance public education in Texas by encouraging all educa- tors lo exercise llicir basic polit- ical rights, by supporting candi- dates and nominees for public offices and by encouraging Ihe people of Texas lo vole on mat- ters submitted to them accord- ing lo Ihe needs of public educa- tion. "For a long time it's been fell that educators haven't been ac- tive politically. Wilh (lie finance 'situation the way it is. wilh the added "pressure being put on schools lo do a good job and realizing lhal money is impor- tant lo the promotion of educa- tion, teachers now feel il is im- portant lo elect Ihosc persons who will al least give education some top said Mrs. Harris. "Kor education to be recog- nized as il sliould Slirman said, "il is necessary lhal the people concerned with II be vi- tally interested in it and be able to voice their opinions and de- sires a's to wliai legislation we gel and lo what representation we have in our elected offi- cials." TKI'AC HAS NOT yel 'an- nminced wliich races il will be- come involved in Ibis year, bill Mrs. Harris said she expects the group to support candidates in almost all contests for.senators, representatives and stale offi- cers including the governor and lieutenant governor. Endorsements will be made by a two-ltiirds vole of tlie TUPAC boards after receiving recommendations from a special three-member committee ap: pointed to interview political candidates. Slirman said he does not'know whether the organization intends to endorse candidates in lime for Ihc May -t primaries, and Jlrs. Harris said she is not sure whether Ihe group will suffi- ciently organized in time. Price Jump Second Highest on Record Just a Broken Nose A long telephone pole being carried by a utility truck wenl crashing, through the'windshield of a car driven by Sheryl Trump, 2G, in Foil Lauderdale, Fla. Wednesday. She'escaped with only a broken nose. (AP Women's Lea der Refuses 'Private' Joycee Meeting TUI.SA, Okla. (AP) The president of .the U.S. Jaycees refused Thursday lo meet in public with the'president of Ihe National Organization for Wom- en Hick Clayton, Jaycees prcsi- dciil, invilcd Wilma Scott Heidc and a few of her associalcs in- side Ihe Jaycees' national head- quarters here for a "private" nicelins but Mrs. Heide refused to nice! wilh Clayton. "We don't have private meet- she told him. "This -is a public issue. You arc spending public funds." "At this poinl in Clay- Ion started lo say. "I've heard .'at. this i" lime' a loi Mrs. Heide interrupted. "I will not exclude my sislers and my brother's." Clayton (hen lold her "il would serve no useful purpose" for (he Iwo lo meet publicly and he went back into the building. One of the 15 women demon- strating against (he Jaycees' men-only membership policy suggested they try to get inside Hie building. But Ihe Jaycees locked tlicmselvcs inside. "The Jaycees arc locked in. The Jaycees arc locked the demonstrators chanted. "Lock- ed doors, locked After several hours of demon- slraling (he women and Iwo male supporters led. The Jay- cees gol out of the building by 5 p.m. A former Abilcnian, Claylon is returning to Abilene in June to begin his campaign for the'stale legislature. He is unopposed on the ballot for' the Republican Cify Jobless Only 885 By ncndrlcr-Ncws Auslin Bureau AUSTIN Total mcnl in Abilene in December was 2.0 per cent, the Texas Em- ploymcnl Commission reports, representing SS5 jobless. The December rale was down from Ihc 2.3 rate for November, and down from the 2.4 per cenl for December 1372. Laredo's rale of 15.1 per. cent was the highcsl for Ihc slate in December, while Lubbock's rale of 1.5 was Ihe lowest. Statewide, December unem- ployment averaged 2.9 per cent, compared to 3.0 per cent in No- vember, and 2.7 per ccnl in De- cember 1072, the TEC said. nomination from District 62. The Jaycees have refused to admit women as members or any men older than 35 years. NOW is supporting litigation which challenges federal grants in the Jaycees totaling 53 mil- lion lo administer a project lo sludy Ihc poor. "We don't think they should have that said Dr. Sa- rah Allison. "That's like giving money lo the Ku Klux Klan to sludy blacks." NOW contends Ihe .layceos have no right lo bar women from being Jaycees because the men's group gave up ils stand- ing as a private organization when il accepted federal funds. Death of Witness Finally Noticed PHILADELPHIA (AP) Harry Gold, 62, a key witness in the 1051 espionage trial dial letl lo the execution of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, died 18 months ago, il was learned Thursday. A native of Switzer- land, Clold was released from prison in 19C6 after serving years nf a 30-year sentence for passing atomic sccrels to Rus- sian agents. WASHINGTON iAP'1 Wholesale prices boomed up- ward in .January al Ihe second highest monthly rale on record as the inflationary spiral stretched across the entire economy, Die government 'said today. Sharply higher wholesale costs for farm pro'duds, indus- trial commodities, consumer finished gogds and fuels pushed the wholesale price index up by a seasonally adjusted 3.1 per cent, a rise exceeded only by the record 6.2 per ccnl. of last August. In January's rale is computed on an annual basis, il conies oul to an annual rale of in- flation of 37.2 per cenl 3.1 per cent a nuinlh for 12 months. Wholesale prices, accelera- ting in the past few months, have risen al an annual rale of 32.3 per cenl in Hie pasl three months, a record. In the pasl 12 months, they have gone up 20.8 per cenl, the second highest rise for any 12-monlhs period since October, 1947. Wholesale price rises mean lhal Ihe higher cosls will be Texas Panhandle Quake Reported WASHINGTON (AP) An earthquake today shook parts of the Texas Panhandle and ad- joining Oklahoma and Kansas areas, Hie U.S. Geological Serv- ice reported. The recorded al a.m. Texas lime, registered an estimated magnitude of be- tween 4 and 4.5 on Ihe IHchlcr scale. The quake was located abonl 50 miles northeast of Gorger, Texas, and was fell also in Spearman and 1'erryton, Texas; Gnyuion, Goodwill and Ilardcsly, Okla., and Liberal, Kan. There were reports of cracked wells in I'erryloii, the agency said. The Ricliter scale is a meas- ure of ground motion recorded on a seismograph. Every in- crease of one number means a ten-fold increase in magnitude. A quake with a reading of four can cause moderate damage and one of five considerable damage. translated into higher retail prices in the weeks ahead, as inflation shows no letup for the consumer. The Bureau of Labor Statis- tics said wholesale prices in January actually rose al a monthly .rate of 3.S per cent when usual seasonal influences arc subtracted. Prices of farm products and processed foods and feeds jumped o.l per cent on a sea- sonally adjusted basis; industri- al commodities 2.3 per cent and Forecast Dashes Hopes for Rain After a cold front failed lo trigger sFioivefs Thursday, lore- casters at the Weaiher Service said Friday it's back to ''more of Ihe same." Forecasler D. W. Eck said morning cloudiness is expected lo break allowing temperature's to rise into the CDs Friday and iioar 70 .S'aUirday. ECK SAID T'lti: cold front which raised hopes" of rain and lowered temperatures Thursday is now in East Texas carrying a more likely promise of rain tu llial area of the stale. 1 The Abilene vicinity is under the influence of a high pressure syslcm lo the northwest and probably will remain so through Saturday, Kck said. The one other significant sys- tem, Kck said, is a Pacific co'd front approaching from Ihe northwest, which will not affect ihir. area by Saturday. consumer finished goods 2.S per ccnl. All Ihree figures reflected an economy caught in a tre- mendous inflationary grip. A month earlier, wholesale prices wenl up 2.2 per cenl. Tile Nixon administration has offered consumers hope that the price surge will lei up in Ihc second half of this year. The bureau said the wholc- "Sal'e cost of fuel accounted for almost -10.per cenl of the jump in i u d n s t r i a 1 commodities prices, wilh retiuccl petroleum products leaping by 7.7 per cent and crude oil 22 per cent. Hut fuels were not the only commodities rising sharply. iXonferrous metals were up sharply. So were prices for machinery. Of farm products, livestock prices jumped 15.-I per cent, milk 1.2 per cent, eggs .1.8 per cenl, grains S.O per cenl and frcsli fruits and vegetables 7.5 per cenl. In wholesale processed foods, prices of meals, poultry and fish ii-ere up pec dairy products 2 per cent and proc- essed fruits and vegetables 1.1 per cenl. "WEATHER (Weaiher Map, Pg. 6-B) ABILENE AND VICINITY radlusj Clear lo wrllv cloudy and ccoler IcfJoY. loir (oninhl and Solurdny, HorlhweslerLy wiiwls 5 to 15 mph ber coming liphl anil lonjghj. High this otlcrr.oon in me mid 40s. Lovj lonlghl near 40, High Solurdny near 70. High and (or 24 t oni.: 78 srid 3S. High, and fo.v same dole last year: 50 and 13. Sunset fasl night: sunrise toddy; sunscl lonigrtl: Sherman School Head in Top 3 IF.YOU SHOULD FAIL TO RECEIVE YOUR REPORTER-NEWS PCEASE CALL 673-4271 DURING THESE TIMES WEEKDAYS: from lo A.M. and lo P.M. SATURDAY, SUNDAY, HOLIDAYS: from lo A.M. and we will deliver a copy. After these listed limes we do not maintain a delivery service. 'OUTSIDE ABIIENE CAU YOUR LOCAL Ily GARY HALUIllWiK Reporter-News Staff Writer Sherman's nl schools is one of the three lop candidates for Abilene super- intendent, local school officials have confirmed. Dr. George Wendell Hubbard, 46, who has served as Sher- man's (op man for seven years, rounds out the list of the final three choices for Abilcne's lop administrative post lor public schools. The other two choices are lo- cal applicants Dr. Harold Krinson and Dr. Joe Slarncs. as- sistant superintendents. Hubbard and 'his wife met with school board members Wednesday in wlur one official said was Ihe tel inter- view wilh applicants, A DECISION is expected wilh- in the next two weeks. The school board's next public meet- ing is scheduled, for Thursday night, Feb.'28. When the decision has been made, Iruslecs will nave com- pleted a full-scale search that began-on June 8, 1973, when Siipl. A.E. Wells announced he would retire in. the summer of He said lie wanted lo give the board enough time lo pick his .successor, and he hoped In have sufficient time to work wilh the new superintendent. One month after an- nounced liis retirement 'plans, a three-man screening com- mittee mfl wilh Ihe school board Mo decide on criteria lor selecting the new school super- intendent. THE COMMITTEE included Dr. Lorrin Kennamer, dean of (he University of Texas College of Education'; Dr. Donald Mc- Donald, acting dean of Texas University College of Edu- cation; anil Dr. Jack Elder, pro- lessor of education al North Texas Slate University. About 50 educators from at Icusl seven stales applied fov the job. Dr. Slarncs and Dr. Brinsoii were the only local ap- plicant.s. In November, (he screening jCommitlee .turned over a list of 12 top applicants. Prior- lo ils first-interviews witluapplicanl.s, the school board dismissed four of Ihe 12. over' one' month ago, initial interviews with Ihe tori eight candidates w e r e completed, and Ihe list was cut to five. Now, only Ihrce men remain. ..Tl'tlC-.'SALARY probably will 1 be in Ihr- vicinity of Vor ihc school year, Wells is listed as earning Slarncs S20.DI8 and llrinson assistant superintend- ent' in charge of instruction, came to the Abilene Independent School. District in 19G6 from the huge Houston school syslcm. llrinson, assistant superintend- ent in charge of administrative services, has held his prcscni position since 1970. A resident of Abilene for 15 years, he was as- sislant principal al Abilene Hifih for three years.   

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