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Abilene Reporter News: Monday, February 11, 1974 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - February 11, 1974, Abilene, Texas                                "WITHOUT OR TO FRIENDS OR WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS If 93RD YEAR, NO. 239 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, MONDAY'EVENING, FEBRUARY 11, PAGES IN THREE SECTIONS Associated Prest SHOTGUN AND MONEY SACKS -armored car firm manager Burl Dcallicrage New Law Could Put Dent Security Service Armor By'PHIL SHOOK Staff IVrller A privale security' linn has asked the Cily of Abilene lo take another.Ippk-at a new 'could pul" in 'local ar- mored car service. City Ally. Don Chcalham said Friday that Ills office has re- ceived an extensive brier from attorneys for Purolator Security Services Inc. outlining the com- pany's position on a new law which restricts the use of hand- films. The new penal code provision, which became effective Jan. 1, prohibits private guards from carrying ha'ndguns except on their own property or property entrusted lo their protection, and could bring the shotgun hack into use by armored car operators. CARRYING a shofgiin, hoivev- cr, on the street or in an auto- mobile, does not fall within the statutory limits of a prohibited weapon, Chealham said. "That is assuming, of course, that it is not sawed-off, which would make it illegal lo even be in a person's Chea- Iham said. Rurl. Dealherage, manager of rurolator's local office, said that it is his company's position that armored car operators are authorized by the new penal code to carry handguns while performing their duties of pro- tccting and transporting large sums of money. Cily Attorney Chcalhani said lhat he is reviewing; Ihe brief presented by, the attorney for Purolator', and will consult with District Attorney Kd Paynlcr this week. "Many new laws arc subject lo Chcutham said. CIIEATII.UI, commenting on the practical application and benefit :of the new law, said lhat, while criminal law 'was not hjs: specialty, he did think the "ment: beatlierage described some o( (lie problems that (he new law creates for his company, "II is difficult for our men lo cany a load in one arm and a shotgun in Ihe he said. "A manpower problem is also created because the heavier loads, one or two bags, of silver, require an extra Dcather- age said. "It would also be easy for a shotgun to be a c c i d e n 1 1 y fie added. "II might also be dangerous to innocent bystanders if we had .to it." DEATIIEItAGK S A 1 11 the company uses buckshot and rifle slugs in their shotguns, Piirolalor Security Services Inc., along with two other ar- mored car companies in Fort Worth, has been successful in obtaining a temporary. restrain- ing order allowing their ar- mored car operators to continue carrying pistols in lhat city. The new provision of the penal code which went into Jan. I prohibits a person from "in- tentionally, knowingly, or rcck- lessly" carrying a handgun with the following exceptions: A peace officer or -member of Ihe armed forces or National Guard or a guard employed by a penal institution in the actual discharge of his official duties; a person on his own premises under his control; a person trav- eling; or a person engaging in lawful hunting or fishing or oili- er sporting activity. Syrian Blows Said By THE PRESS Syrian gunners dealt "devas- tating blows" lo eight para- military .Israeli settlements to- day and vnped out three missife bases in the Golan Damascus command reported. II claimed' an Israeli lank concenlralian received direct hils during the three-hour artil- lery engagehient lhat flared along the-northern .and central sectors of the 40-mile truce line. "Fifteen enemy artillery, bal- leries also were silenced by Syrian 'the command said. It said the 'clash, which broke out at a.m.' on the northern sector and later spread to coy- er Ihc entire central sector, ended al It was the second straight day of reported artillery clashes oh the Golan, front after a four-day lull. The Tel Aviv military command had no im- mediate report on today's ac- tion bul said four of its soldiers were woimrjcrt-. in Sunday's clashes. The. Syrians said they shelled Ihe Israeli settlements 'in- flicting heavy losses" lo re- taliate for Israeli' artillery at; lacks on three unarmed civilian villages.. The government-controlled press in Iraq charged mean- while that Iran is massing troops and armor along its per- ennially tense border with Iraq, speeding up the movement fol- lowing heavy clashes Sunday. Baghdad newspapers claimed Ihe fighting in (he Badra area about 100 miles east of the Ir- aqi capital caused 70 Iranian casualties and lefl one Iraq: of- ficer killed and 22 men Wounded. There was no re-port on the fighting from Iran.' ......Iran. and Iraq .have been 'fue'diifg for hearly'i'ltirce dcc- "kdes conflicting claims lo Shalt ul-Arib, the es- luary between the two coun- tries and Iraq's access to thS Persian Gulf. The reports of new fighting were the first f since October, when the two governments: agreed to resume diplomatic relations and try lo end Ihe dispute. Tlie1 Golan shelling came as Israeli forces on Ihe Suez front far lo the south were' to com- plete their withdrawal from-an- other. 200 square -miles'weal of the Suez Canal, carrying out the Israeli-Egyptian disengagement accord engineered by Secretary of Slate Henry A: Kissinger. The Israeli command said il would relinquish a stretch of land extending from .lebel Gen- eifa on Ihe Great Bitter Lake to three miles south of Ihe Fayirt Air Base al Ihe northern lip of Ihe lake. A spokesman said when this withdrawal was completed, Is- rael would have returned about three-fourths or the territory it took on the west side of the ca- nal during Ihe October war. No shooting has been report- ed oh the Suez front since Egypt and Israel signed Ihe disengagement pact on Jan. 18. Defense Minister Moshe Dayan told the Israeli cabinet Sunday thai the Iroop separation was "proceeding according lo Egyptian forces on the easl- ern bank of the canal were re- ported moving men, tanks and equipment, to the west bank, fulfilling their commitment lo thin oat their forces on Ihe east side. An Israeli army radio corre- spondent reported from1 the front lhat the Egyptians blew up four SAM missile sites- as part of (heir evacuation. The agreement calls for Is- rael lo pull out of Ihe square miles she captured west of. Ihe canal by Feb. 21 and withdraw lo a new, lightly mantied line 12 miles east of the waterway by March 5. Egypt is lo withdraw about 000 troops from Ihe casl bank, leaving'a patrol force of about men. United Nations forces will patrol a buffer zone about six miles wide between the two armies, The fourth phase of the Is raeli pullback that'is now com- mencing' will put Egyptian forces in control of both sides of the 13-mile canal for the first lime since the Israelis ad- vanced to its eastern shore in Ihe 19B7 war. The Egyptians are expected to begin work soon lo reopen the canal and repopulatc the buttered towns along it. By the time the withdrawal is completed, Israel also will have surrendered square miles of (he Sinai Desert captured in the 1067 war. Her main defense' forces are establishing them- selves in heavily fortified posi- lions al. the Gidi, and Mitla mountain passes 18 lo 20 miles east.of Ihe canal. As Ihe withdrawal pro- gressed, Israeli television showed films of Israeli and Egyptian troops exchanging ad- dresses and inviting'.each other to Cairo and Tei Aviv "wh'en peace comes." Some of the Is- raelis left behind nolcs for the Egyptians saying, "Jlay (here be peace and friendship be- tween us." Key Union Backs British Miners By-PETER MUCCINI Associated Press Writer LONDON (AP) A key un- ion pledged support today for striking British miners in their bid to keep coal slocks from Ihe nation's power stations. As the nationwide coal slrike kepi the miners Ironi the .pits for their first working day, the general and municipal workers' union instructed ils members al the power planls not lo. handle stocks of coal arriving al the plants. The -u n 1 e n, Britain's third largest, iilso said thai no fuel oil should be handled after existing slocks are exhausted. Similar instruclions already had been issued by the Trans- port and General Workers' Un- ion and Hie union of railway en- gineers. The coal slrike against .Prime Minister Edward Heath's anli- inflation ceiling on wage raises at midnight Saturday. JJut the miners have not been working overtime and Sundays for three months, so today was their first working day away from the job. Pickets ordered lo the British Steel Corporation's works at 'Scuhlhorpe, in eastern England, lo hall deliveries of coking coal. Other pickets look station :il east coast ports to stop Ihe landing of some 500.000 tons of coal from Poland. Several incidents were re- ported-Sunday! Police had In clear a way for safely mainte- nance workers through 30 jeer- ing miners at a colliery in Ged- ling, Nottinghamshire. Three trucks were overturned when their drivers arrived at a mine in south Wales. M e'si n 'w h i 1 c, Heath's Con- servative parly, in ils first campaign manifesto for the general election IlcalK has called Feb. 2fl, Ihrealened lo end- government welfare pay- rr.enls to Hie wives and children of strikers. The Conservatives said if re- elected, Ihey would amend the social security system to make; the unions responsible for Hie support of strikers' families. "It is only right lhat Ihe un- ions themselves and nol (lie taxpayer should accept their primary responsibility for the welfare-of the families of the inch who choose (o go on said Ihe platform. The welfare program strikers' themselves no govern- ment money. Bul a mother with Itirec children, for ex- ample, can colled about a week, plus free milk, free school meals and some assist- Gold Soars to New Mark ance lo keep up inlerest pay- ments on mortgages, automo- biles, refrigerators and other basic household items bought on lime. The-Conservative manifesto -also said: "The choice before the nulipn.'as never before, is a clear choice between moder- alion and extremism. "We appeal for Ihe support of Ihe great moderate majority of Ihe Brilish people who reject extremism in any shape or form." II said lo accept the miners terms for a settlement "would mean accepting the abuse of in- dustrial power lo gain a privi- leged posilion. "H would undermine the posi- lion of moderate trades union leaders. 11 would make it cer- tain that similar strikes oc- curred al frcqucnl intervals in the future." LONDON (AP) Gold .soared lo record levels on Eu- ropean markets today. Dealers blamed fears for" the values of paper mounting indications :'that central banks WEATHER U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Mjfianal Weather Strvict (Weolhtr Map, Pg. 11} ABILENE AND VICINITY Hft-mlk radius) lair. and warm today and Tutstfay; fair and cool lonirjhl. Winds mojNy lighl and variable. Higti today near 70; Jow lonisht low 30s, hipri Tuesday upper 70s. High and low (or 14 hours ending f 70 end 24, High Tow sami dale lost year: J? oatf if, Sunset I ml riiqhlr iunrin lodiy: sunset lonishJ: Fuss Over Dog Leads to Death DALLAS (AP) was shot to death and her hus- band wounded :Sunday night .during an argument with another couple over a po- lice said. Detective T.W. Willingham said the incident began when i dog chased and frightened one of the children of Kcliciano and Bosa Lara- Police said Lara, 42, caught Ihe dog, .tied a rope around ils neck and'was hanging it from a garage door when a passing car stopped. Willingham said a man and woman in Ihe car began ar- guing with Lara over his treat- ment of the animal. Mrs. Lara, 40, left the house and went lo her-husband's side. Willingham said Ihe couple drove away with the man lean- ing from the car firing a pistol. The bullet drilled through Lara's chest and struck his wife in Ihe heart. Police said the couple es- caped. The dog freed itself and also escaped. Mrs. Lara was dead on arrival at a hospital. Lara was hospitalized in serious condition. may soon increase Ihe official price of gold. Gold (radcd al S146 ann ounce in London and an ounce in Zurich. The price al Friday's close in London was 5143.50. Opening prices on the Zurich bullion market, Ihe world's big- gest, were bill and of- fered, up from 5142-5144 Friday. The previous record price in Zurich was on Jan. 25. The .bullish -weekend trend was touched off by reports from 'Johannesburg, Ihe mining center for Ihe West's gold, thai a consorlium of West European countries, including France, Italy and perhaps Wcsl Germa- ny, might begin buying at a price related to the free market price. The trend picked up because of an interview published today in which French Finance Minis- ter-' Valery discard' d'Eslaing said he expected an increase in the official price of gold year. The dial price systenv-fov gold with an official price sel by government central banks and a free market price for trading by private persons and firms was terminated lasl -November. This left gov- ernments free to sell gold at any price it would bring in Iho market. But the Western gov- ernments continued' (o buy al the official price at lhat time, 542.22 an ounce. Vocational Week Here Vocational Week in'.Tex- .os Schools is being observ- .ed lo point out the work- training programs available to studenls. The Abilene schools' programs are re- viewed in a two-part- series beginning today on Page I-B. Amusements............ 6B Business Minor 5B Bridge.................' 6A Classified 5-9C Comics 4C Editorials 4A Horoscope.............. 4B Hosprlol Potisnls 8A Obituaries 6B Sporls.............- To Your Hcallh...... TV Log 5A TV Scour___........... 5A Women's News'.......... 3B Area Independents Await Shreveport Truck Meet By GARY BAI.DrtllK.K Reporter-News Slalf Writer Jlosl independent truckers op- erating oul of the Abilene area continued their shutdown Mon- day morning, apparently await- ing the outcome of a Tuesday meeting in Shroveporl to discuss plans for protest. Uuciness was down 40 per cent at the Wylie Shamrock Truck Stop in Mcrkcl, said Fred Cren- shaw, manager. Almost all of his diesel sales over Ihe week- Equipment Removal Illegal, Says DPS By EU.IE nUCKEB Q. When I .bought my car, Ihc law required all Ihc latesl smog control de- vices. I hclicvc It was illegal to have them lakcn off, with something like a fine.for the mechanical genius who removed Ilicni. Lately I've heard nn-llic news of "clinics" in (he Kasl doing a Icvriflc business removing gas- caling smog control paraphernalia. I've asked around town; there seems lo be divided opinion whether it's now legal lo do this. A. We don't know about ihc-easterners and their clinics hut it's still against the law in Texas. For one thing, youi' car won't pass Ihe safely inspection, but besides lhat, you're subject lo a fine up to for re- moving, disconnecting or intentionally mak- ing the exhaust emission system inopcraljlc. So says Ihc Texas Department of Public .Safely. Q. Id I Ihc, lady whri WHS saving her newspapers for re-cycling that Girl Seoul Troop' 45 come by and pick (liem up. This Is our Iroop projccl and we'll plck'iip everybody's papers. A. We honft you mean it when you say ''everybody" because you're gonna be bom- barded wiih rcqucsls. The number is'673- 3308, for Trop Leader Sandra Sanders- Other groups doing this might call Mrs. Sanders in a day or so. Shejnay need a helping hand. 0. How does Ihc Presidential Klrcllon Campaign Fund on Ihe Income lax form work? Docs It cost me money? Will there continue to be private contrlbii- lions to campaigns? Someone said that If I rtUTn'l use (he campaign fund check- off year, I couM (akc Ihis Ilils correct? A. II doesn't cbsl you a penny. The is taken from tax yon would have lo pay any- way. Say you owe the government in income lax this -year would co into the treasury, SI to Ihc Presidential Cam- paign fund, if you so designate, Tin1 neve presidential campaign may be financed entirely by these individual contri- butions. If enough taxpayers check oft presidential candidates accepting funds from this campaign fund can accept contri- butions from no other source. The whole purpose is lo eliminate large contributions from wealthy individuals or big businesses who may expect favors in'return. If you did not contribute last year, you may double your amount this year. Maxi- mum contribution per ycar.is SI if you file a single return, for joint return. Only those who have already paid lax this year or who owe tax can participate in the check-off program, says Bill liiondi, public affairs officer for IRS in Dallas. Q. IVHh (he usual means of transpor- tation about (o be Inhibited by Ihc gas shortage, sonic of us would ride Ihe rails again It >vc knew where passenger service is available. I've already called Ihe travel agencies for AMTRAK sched- ules. They have no Info. Where we get a regional and national schedule, with raits Included? A. Write AMTUAK, 80 K. Jackson, Chica- go, III. GOtiO-1. Specify you want a lime table, brochure, regional and nalional schedule and rates. Anything you want, specify. A slack of material is available lo answer almost any question you have. You can also call (817) .138-0265 bin be prepared for a 15 lo 20-minnle wait. Your call will ho auto- matically switched lo Chicago headquarters. Q. My mother bonghl a set of Salad- nuislcr Cookwarc a couple years ago supposedly guaranteed for life. The cof- fee pot slopped Narking and she can't find anyone to fix II. IVe think II nctnls lo he repaired by an authorized Salnd- masfer dealer hn( (fie representative In Wcsl Texas lias moved. Can you help Ilnd x Saladmastcr dealer? A. Write Harry Lcmmons, in care of Sa- ladmasler, 131 llowcll, Dallas 75207. lie should be able to help you get lhat pot perking again. Addre.ss questions lo Action Unc, Box 10, Abilene, Texas 79GOI. Names will nol be. used hill questions musl be signed and addresses given. I'lcasc Include Id- cphone. numbers If possible. end has been to company Iruck- ers- Traffic of Independents was somewhat heavier al the Aliilene Truck Stop al Tye.' Fuel was pleiiliftil at Ijotli locations. A 3 P.M. TUESIUY meeting Is planned al the Kelly Truck Slop in Shreveport, La., to dis- cuss plans lo protest high diesel prices and low freight rales, ac- cording to Bill Corpier of Wood- lawn, Tex. lieside diesel prices and losv freight rates, told the Associated I'ress ho was' president of Ihe Truck Drivers of -America, said the truckers insist on an increase in highway speeds lo 6i niilcs.per hour be- tween 9 p.m. and 4 a.m. daily. 11 was business as usual at mosl Abilene service stations .Monday morning, with major distributors repmling all fuel pumps in operation. Jimmy Kav- ringlon, of Fiirringlon Brothers in Abilene, said Monday, "We're short, but everybody is." BUT Till'- SIIOHTAGES wer- en't expected to hit locally until Ihe latter par! of the month, when the already-reduced allo- cations dwindle close lo the empty mark. On -Ihe (nickers1 issuo. a group of 40 indepcndcnls who said Ihe.y represented over 500, drivers in the area met in Sweeiwiitei- Sunday nighl and to reject President Nix-; on's proposal to rclurn lo work. Even though the drivers' group called for a oonvjilcle work'stoppage, an association of truck stop owners voted Sunday to keep ils facilities open, GEORGE- SIMONS, director of Ihe Southwest Assn. of Truck Slops, said he sent the following telegram to members: "The Southwest Assn. of Truck. Slop Owners (SWATSO) today.voted unanimously to keep all truck slops open within the current and for all members to re- main open until such time aj KWATSO shall vote lo the con- trary." L. It. Sells, an independent Irucker in Sweelwater and -in whose house the truckers' meet- ing was said the local truckers were not members of Ihe group called Truck Drivers of America, bul'.thai they, did plan lo cooperate with lhat group's work stoppage plan. Glass Broken in Over 20 Autos The switchboard at the Abi- lene Police Department was til up like a pinball machine gone wild Monday morning as reports of broken window glass poured in from around ihc city. Glass in cars from S. 5lh the vicinity of Ilendrick Memo- rial Hospital was broken over- night. The more lhan 20 calls that had come in by 10 a.m. Monday seemed heavies! in Ihe north part of Ihe city. Police were still investigating (he incidents Monday morning and had mil dclerm.incd huw Iho jjlass had been broken out. :i   

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