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Abilene Reporter News: Wednesday, January 30, 1974 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - January 30, 1974, Abilene, Texas                                "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT Byron 93HD NO: 227' PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, .TEXAS, 79GQ4, WEDNESDAY EVENING, JANUARY 30, 2H PAGES IN THREE SECTIONS Associated Presi (IF) j Chow Time for 'Susie-Q' Vivienhe Goggans of. 4038 S. 7lh, a veterinary nurse with Dr. James Kelly's clinic, feeds dog which the Jim Polk family of Abilene found injured and brought to the clinic at their own expense. (Slaff Photo by Don Blakley) 'Susie-Q' Wasn't Just Another Dead Dog on Highway to Polks By JIM CONLEY Reporter-News Staff Writer Al first it Just looked like another dead dog along the highway, bul as Cynthia Polk of Abilene looked closer she thought she saw 'the animal's head move, So the 15-year-old Madison Junior High student asked her dad, Jim Polk, lo lurn the car around and go back lo check. 'A'lot have shrugged-off the request, but the Polks have made a habit of helping hurt and abandoned animals. SURE ENOUGH when they went back to the median be- tween S. 7lh and Ihe Winters Freeway, they found the dog was not badly hurl. "We had to carry her into Ihe said Polk, an inde- pendent oil man who lives at 3602 High Meadows, "Appar- ently she had just been dazed... she had such a good disposition, didn't try lo bile or' anything.'.' The Polks called vclerinarian Dr. James Kelly, who met then soon at his clinic on South 1st. Now, nine days lale, "Su- as veterinary nurse Vi- vicnnc Goggans. calls her, is fil, friendly and looking for a home. POLK ran an ad in The Re- porter-News, and Cynthia' tried a local radio ad program, but (his time Ihey didn't gel Ihe customary results for their of- fer of the animal. "We've run many ads for dogs and 'cats, some thai we've taken to the said Polk, "and usually we find a home Ihe ncxl day." "We've even. found lit- ters oul on Ihe or five lillle pups just dumped beside the road." Polk declines lo lake the credit for the good Samaritan role in which he finds himself. "It's really my daughter; she's, interested in animals Truck Fuel Plan Due Hy JAY 1'EKKINS Associated I'res Wrller WASHINGTON (AP) The federal government. today an- nounced'a de- signed to alleviate fuel prob- lems in .the trucking industry and to head off 'any possible widening of pro-" lesl by Midwestern truck oper- ators. Special presidential as- sistant W. J. Usery Jr. said the plan will allow truck oper- ators to pass through to truck- ing companies any difference tliay must pay in the cost of diesel fuel .from' what they paid on May 15, 1973. and ]usl-real kind he said. NEVKHTIIELKSSS Polk Is fooling the veterinary bill, which will run or more, so anyone who wants Susie-Q can call Dr. Kelly and come pick her up at liis clinic, 5925 S. 1st. The Polks already have a dog and cat of their own or they could lake the'tan, black and brown dog. Dr..Kelly, who's of the Tay- lor-Jones Humane S o c i e I y, said the dog required a couple of shots and was badly bruised bul seems fully recovered. It's not the first time he's had people bring in. ininrcd animals which weren't their own and pay the bill, he said. "It happens a couple of times a week. And we try to. place any animals we said Dr. Kelly, with a smile which re- flected how he feels about peo- ple who come to Ihe aid of animals which aren't even their own. The plan also provides for a new mandatory allocation pro- gram that will guarantee de- livery of the fuel needed by the. trucking industry, Usery said. The mandatory allotment will lie 110 per cent of 1972 consumption. The third part of the propos- al will be a tripling in the number of price monitors who will check truck stops and fuel outlets for price gouging. Windshields were shot out of three trucks near Youngstown, Ohio, Tuesday night as hide- Systems to Prolong Sunshiny Weather Forecasters at the National Weather Service are predicting at least four more days of sun-, shine for- this area, which has received less than a half-inch, of rain in the past three months. Since-Nov. 1, 1973, Abilene has had only .41 inches of precipita- tion, forecaster Jack Schnabel said Wednesday. The current lair conditions are the result of two high pres- sure systems, one over the JIouslon-Galveslon area, the oth- er to the north and west of Tex- as over the Four Corners area. THE TWO SYSTEMS, Schna- bel said have cleared the skies with warm, dry air. liotti of these systems would have to mnve'ih order for Abilene to get any rain. "And thai isn't going to hap- Schnabel said. A Pacific cold "front is waiting in the winds, Schnabel said, bul the stationary warm spols ha- ven't; budged and jre not likely, to, it-least fhVoughJihe The high pressure systems, loo strong to allow the Pacific front to move in. In addition to the lack of pre- cipitation, the two high pressure systems are also creating a des- WEATHER COMMERCE National Weather Servici (Weather Mnp  upper AOs. Lov; lo- nighl In upper 30s. High .Thursday near High ftnd low for H ending 1 a.m.: 43 and 32. Higli and low somi dale last year: 42 and 40. sunsel last nighl: sunrise joday: sunael tonfghl: ert-like span In the daily tem- perature range. SCIINABEIJ- SAID that be- cause there is no cloud cover lo trap the heal being radiated by the earth at night, it escapes and therefore cools the tempera- lure lo the freezing level. The lack of clouds creates the opposite effect in the daytime, sending the temperature soaring into the upper 60s, Schnabel said. The present conditions are ex- pected to send the prevailing dry spell into its fourth month. pendent truckers continued their protests against soaring fuel prices. Hut elsewhere in the nation, there .were few reports uf' Irucker protests as the dead- line drew near (or a nation- wide shutdown urged by inde- pendent truckers. The trade magazine "Over- drive" and newly organized truckers' groups scattered across the nation have called for a shutdown al midnight to- night, lasting until the federal government alleviates the fuel problem. There is no indication how successful or widespread such a shutdown might be. There have been protests and occasional violence1 in Ohio the past eight days. Pick- cling or shutdowns occurred intermittently in New Jersey, Oklahoma arid western'Penn- sylvania earlier in the week, bul by Tuesday night and ear- ly loday the protests centered in eastern Ohio and along the Ohio-West Virginia border. The Ohio State Highway.Pa- trol said windshields were shot out of three trucks on Inter- stale 80 near Youngstown Tuesday nighl. No one was hurl in any of the shoolings. A bridge over Hie Ohio Riv- er bclvvccn East Liverpool, Ohio, and Newell, W.Va. was closed 1JA hours Tuesday nighl because of a bomb lineal. No explosives were found. were similar threats Monday night. West Virginia State Police speculated that the threats were made to keep traffic from moving across the Ohio River. Meanwhile, one of the big- gest truck stops along the Ohio Turnpike shut down be- cause of fuel shortages. Joe .Dallorio, owner of Ihe Pcnn-Ohio :'truck- slop, 'near Youngstown, said he was clos- ing'because he was out of die- selfuel aiiil had gal- lons of regular gasoline left. Daltorio said (he truckers' protest has cut down oh traffic and he is doing only cent of his normal business. Some oil companies said threats .of violence have cut 'down luel .oil deliveries to eastern, Ohio.. A'spokesman for Standard Oil Co, of Ohio.said deliveries to same points have been ir- regular- because of 'possible violence. L.Gi Johnson, Sohio's Youngslown region said deliveries from the Com- pany's Miles terminal are down 75 per cent, and rio'rims' are being made at. night. lie said the protesters follow trucks out of the Niles termin- al, pull the drivers over and persuade, them by threats :.lo return lo the terminal without making their deliveries. Attorney Joins Legislative Race Beporler-Ncws Austin- Bureau AUSTIN Abilene attorney Mike _ Young- 3D; repreSe'nlalive as a bemocralic primary opponent to Hep. Elmer Martin of Colora- do City. Young paid his filing fee lo stale Democratic Chairman Calvin Guest, and filed the name of Abilene businessman Joe Galloway as his campaign manager. Young said his candidacy was "largely a draft situation." "SINCE FRIDAY o( last lie said, "I've had nu- merous people urge me to run because' they (eel they need forceful representation in our district. The one-man, one-vole concept has created a need for a forceful voice from rural areas." Martin's district includes Fish- er, .Jones, Mitchell, Nolan and part .of Taylor, counties.: Martin also filed for reelection Wednesday morning- with the Democratic party chairman. Filing deadline is Monday. Young was raised al Roby and altcnded McMurry College, the University of Texas and Baylor Law School. A GRADUATE of Abilene High has been in private law practice in Abilene for the past six years. Elecled lo Ihe .board .of Irus- lees of the Abilene Independent School District in 1972, he also serves on Hie board of directors of the Taylor County Chapter of American Heart Assn., Abilene Fine Arts Museum, the West Central Texas Council of Gov- M1KE YOUNG opposes Klmcr Martin. ernments and the Taylor County Child Welfare Unit. He was named Outstanding Young Abilenian of 1973 by ths Jaycees. Young is married lo the for- mer. Erankie Smith of Roby. They have two children, Trye, 13, and Robyn, 8. Mrs. Meir Has Peace Hope JERUSALEM (AP) Pre- mier Golda Meir of Israel said loday that- "we might be al the beginning of the road lo peace" wilh-lhe Arabs. Mrs. AHer expressed her op- timism as she began formal sleps lo form her fourth gov- ernment. The Syrian command report- ed minor skirmishes with Is- raeli forces on the Golan lleighls for the (ourth straight day. Lebanese new-papers reported that some Syrian leaders do not share Mrs. Mier's opliniism and that the Damascus regime is split over whether lo give Is- rael the olive branch or a cold shoulder. Syria, unlike Ms' partner Egypt in last October's Arab- Israeli war', has not agreed to swap prisoners with Israel, to separate military forces along cease-lire lines and has not al- tcnded the Geneva Mideast peace conference thai began last month. Hardliners in Syria's Region- al Command, the ruling Tiaalh party's highest aulhorijy, (eel that Syria should make no con- cessions to Israel, the Beirut newspaper 1'Orient-I.e Join- said. Olher Syrian leaders in Ihe Regional Command want an ac- cord under which Israel would withdraw from all territory oc- Over 850 Families Receive Stomps By ELME JIUCKER Q. Who's eligible for (he (OIK! stamp program? Who dclerr.r'MS who Is eligi- ble? I've walchcd a lot of people stand- ing in line for the stamps ami they don't appear poverty stricken. I've seen some leave in shiny new cars. On Ihe oilier hand, I know elderly people thai just can'l make il on (heir Social Security checks alone. They really need help. From here, il.looks as If the people that really need It aren't ficlllng help. A. In defense, Food Slamn Supervisor Lin- da Kelly explained disabled or handicapped people.can have an aulhoiwd rcprescnla-' live pick up Ih'cir stamps. The bigi shiny .cars could belong lo a reprcsenlalive. And, she says, il's not unusual for a person to lose his job unexpectedly, suddenly become eligible for food stamps while making pay- ments nil a big car purchased during belter days. Now for some fact'. The U.S. Department of Agriculture sets up requirements'for par- licipation. Slate Welfare Department deter- mines eligibility. Eligibility' depends on net income and number in the family. For cximple a family of one with ,a net.income below 5183 a month is eligible. To figure net income you subtract a lot of deductions from total monthly income. De- ductible items: medical expenses, luiiion and mandatory fees for education, Social Security and income tax payments, full cost of child care. A person paying extremely high rent or house payments can deduct a percentage of Ihe payment. A person whose income is from a job (rallicr than Social Security, welfare or VA) is allowed a 10 per cent deduction not lo exceed S30 a month. Those between 18 and 65 must'be Icrcd for work al Texas Employment Com- mission lo be eligible for the stamps. There's also a resource limit under Co it's Checking and savings account bal- ances, second car, boat (elc.) and properly olhcr than the homestead arc figured In the resource limit, Hclvvecn 850 and MO families are receiving food stamps in Taylor County. Q. In Ihe 104 nnd m block of Walnut I'm faced with the same silnalinii going and i-oining from work. Tell inc. is H legal for a large trailer truck lo block Ihe enlire rlghi hand side of the slrcol oul over Ihe cenlor hiiKons? Anil Is il Illegal to drive on Ihe opposite side of the street lo gel around1 a truck thai has half (he street blocked? A. Yes and no. As long as the truck is loading or unloading, leaves 10 feel of clear- ancc in Ihe street, it's ok. ll's legal for you to veer-to the led of center to gel around the Irnck; just be cautious, warns Police SRI. Jack Hurst. My husband Wiis pul on a bland dlel recently and given a list of allowed fnoils lint no real suggestions for dishes. Where could 1 find menus and recipes for such a strict dlel? A. Dietitian Milla Perry suggests you write American Dietary Assn., GOO N. Miclii- gan Ave., Chicago, tlOfill. For another cook- book, look on Ihe Cream of Rice, box al the grocery store. There's an address on the side of the box. Q. Docs anyone here cover Bride's Hooks with sadn and lace? I've called print shops, office supplies, gift stores, I've called everybody. A lady in (ira- ham nscil to do il but she passed away. The parlies slarl In February sa I nerd help A. You musl not have called any bridal shops because Ihe first one we called had three salesladies working on Bride's Books Ihal minute. You select your own satin, the lace and add a few pearls if you want lo be really tloosie. We've sent you the name of the shop. Address questions (o Action Line. TSox :ifj, Abilene, Texas 791104. Names will not he used but questions musl he signed and addresses Riven. Please Include Id- crhone number, If possible. cupied in the war last October and then pull out of territory occupied in Ihe 1367 war, hut retaining areas on Ihe crown of Ihe Syrian Golan lleighls. In Moscow, the Communist parly- newspaper Pravda said separation of Ihe Egyptian and Israeli armies along Ihe canal could be a posilivc step only if il is followed by '-oilier radical measures" leading -to withdrawal of Israeli troops from all Arab lands. Pravda said that continued occupation nf Arab lands "is fraught with ever new ex- plosions that can inflict Ire- rncndous devastation and losses on Middle East countries and imperil universal peace." "Mrs. Meir's task in forming a new government was the result of "N'ew Year's Eve elections that cut the strength of her La- bor parly. Teachers View Organization Abilene teachers like the ideo of a national organi- zation, but not unions, ond Ihe future of the NEA and AFT merger, without the AFL-CIO, is the issue. Tea- chers discuss the issues in a story on Pg. 1-B. Amusements 9C Bridge 3A Business Mirror 5B Classified............. 4-8C Comics 7tf Editorials.............. 4A Horoscope...............3A Hcspilol Palienls 8A Obiluarjes...............8C I............... 1-3C To Your Good Hcollh SB TV l.oq 9C TV Scout 9C Women's Newi..........2.3B A President Ephraim Katzir summoned Mrs. Uleir lo his residence and asked her to put together a new government. She said she would try lo do the job in less than llie for Ihe task. She can have another three weeks if she needs it. Putting together a new ma- jority in the Knesset, the Is- raeli parliament, could be diffi- cult. .The National Religious parly, a traditional partner of religions restriclions and changes in the. Law of Return, which gives nil Jews Ihe right lo live in Israel. So far Ihe Laboriles have re- sisted the Religious demands, which include recognition 'of conversions to Judaism only if performed by Orthodox' rabbis. This wonpld repudiate many Conservative or Reform Jews in the United Stales and Eu- rope. A WEEKENDER lie lure way to gef y Menngei into iht buyefl' Ji 15 WORDS 3 DAYS Save 12' per wortJ A'ldil.onnl worth 15' eadi No phone orders Cash in advance Dnndlini! 3 pm IhundViy No rtlundi HBIUHt KEPORUR-NCVrS   

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