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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: January 21, 1974 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - January 21, 1974, Abilene, Texas                                Abilene WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR COES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT Byron 93RD YEAR, NO. 218 PHONE G734271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, MONDAY EVENING, JANUARY 21, PAGES IN THREE SECTIONS Associated Prea (fP) By EUJE RUCKER 68% Social Security Increase Questioned Q. In Ibc morning paper under an Al' byline about President Nixon signing the. Increase in Social Security, the article said since he hail taken office (which is about 5 years) that Social Security has increased cenl. 1 linvc never studied (he New Malli have been drawing Social Security lor eight years anil mine has not Increased anything like that. By what mclhoil do they figure a per tent raise? A. Nixon took office Jan. 20, January 1570 you had a 15 per cenl increase; tlicn a 10 per cent increase January 1971; 20 per cent increase September 1972. The current legislation provides for 11 per cent in a two-step raise your check will show a 7 per cent increase in April, a 4 per cent increase in July, according to Olyn H-JIII- nions at the Social Security office. You probably grabbed your' pencil, added the percentages, and found this totals only 56 per cent. Right, bill yon actually received because the increase is added before the next increase percentage is figured. Il's a compounding situation. Let's take, for example, a February 19G8 monthly benefit in the amount of Add a 15 pei' cent increase and you have S115.GO. Add 10 per cent of and you have 5127.20. Take 20 per cent of add the increase and you have 5152.70. Now add the latest 11 per cent increase and you have ?16D.50. Compare the 5169.50 with Hie original and this gives you ap- proximately a 69 per cenl increase. Though the percentage increases total 56 per cent, the benefit that was payable in February 1969, has increased by slightly more than per cent. Clear as Well that's the way it works. Q. We're not splitting up over It hut ray husband and I are having real trou- ble a blonde. We have a 510 bet going that I'm positive I tan win if I can get printed Information about Ihe Gary Cooper movie "Hanging Tree." Ifc says" (he blonde female lead was Angle Dickinson. I don'! know who it was but I know il wasn't Angic. A. You win the bet. The blonde, Eliza- beth, was played liy Maria Schcll, says the very reliable' reference staff at the City Library. Q. Why oh why was the angle of park- ing changed in front of M System In Hirer Oaks Shopping Center? Before, spaees were marked so cars headed In facing southeast. Now they're marked lo (ace southwest and it's most incon- venient. If one enters (lie parking area from Willis, he had heller he in the right hand lane but If he Is, lie must cross tlie on- coming (raffle lo enter a parking space. Going east In the right hand lane, he miisl -circle a( least two lanes of parked cars. T witnessed several near accidents and many lost (cmpers during the crowded shopping days prior lo Christmas. A. rl'hc M System store manager sees your point. The present set-up works fine when the center isn't crowded but during the holi- days and on busy week-ends it has been somewhat hazardous. He has asked the own- er of Ihe center lo see about changing Ihe angle. The only hitch now is finding a way 10 remove the painted stripes so new-stripes can be painted. They're looking into il. Q. On Christmas my daughter helpful- ly ironed the tablecloth while il was nil the dining room table. Now (he table lias while heat marks. Know of a sim- ple, do-it-yourself, home-remedy for re- moving the spots? A. Our book, "How to Clean suggests a cloth dampened with peppermint 011 or turpentine. Rub lightly. Or try finely powdered pumice, to a light paste wilh lemon oil. Or surprise your husband with a "gift cigar" and rub the cigar ash lighlly in the direction of Ihe grain. Wipe with a cloth dipped in lemon oil, then po- lish. That's Ihe sum tola) of our home reme- dios. If none of these .work, give us a call, we'll put yon in louch with a professional furniture refinisher. Address questions to Action I.lne, Box 30, Abilene, Texas 70GQI. Names will not lie used bn( (jucslioiis must he signed and addresses given. Please Include (clephone nnmhcrs If possible.__________ 7th Fleet Aid Said Rejected Important Rodeo Task To Ben Davis, rodeo clown al the Abilene Junior Hodeo held in Ihe Taylor County Coliseum Thurs- day through Saturday, the only thing thai is im- porlanl is to protect the cowboy and keep the bull oul of Ihe corner. IT he tails to distract the blill, it can require his going into the corner to keep the bull 1'rom rooting the cowboy. Davis is from Abilene. Slory, Pg. IB. (Staff photo by John Davis) Energy, Impeachment No. 1 Topics By .JIM ADAms Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP) The second session of the 03rd Con- gress will be dominated from the start by the energy crisis and on wheth- er President Nixon should be impeached. Sen. Henry SI. Jackson's pr- manenl Senate1 investigations subcommittee planned hearings Ihe first day back today on one of tlie energy crisis' overriding questions: arc fuels really short or are the oil companies hold- ing back? The Washington Democrat called in Ihe heads of major oil companies for the first hearing, along wilh federal energy chief William E. Simon. The House judiciary Com- mittee hired staff directors dur- ing the recess and began its in- vcsligation into whelher Ihe President should be impeached before Congress' second session even started. Associated Press interviews wilh more lhan a dozen return- ing congressmen indicated they had no mandate from their con- stituents for or against im- peaching the President. Although some congressmen already had decided how they would vole, mosl said they and their -constituents were waiting lo see; what the House Judiciary Committee impeach- ment investigation finds. "II depends on what the jury brings said Rep. Jack F- Kcnip, R-N.Y. Rep. Bob Bcrgland. D-Alinn., said, "If there are many more shoes dropped like the other day (disclosure of five to nine erasures of a Watergate lape) lhal kind of thing docs Ihe President great li.irm. II tends lo sway those who fell Ihere wasn't enough evidence lo feel that's il." House Judiciary Chairman Peter Hodino Jr., D-N.J., announced lasl month the com- mittee would try to deliver its findings for or against im- peachment by Ihe end of April although there is skepticism it can work that fast. Other major issues before Congress this year will be lax reform; pension reform and for- eign trade. Congress has yel lo pass the massive emergency energy au- thorization for President Nixon that il failed lo approve in the closing days of the lasl session. The ffouse and Senate dead- locked over its provisions for' controlling excess oil company profits bnt Ihe House Ways and Means Committee has agreed now to work on separate legis- lalion for that. The excess profits bill done, Chairman Wilbur D. Mills, D- Ark., says the committee will Ihen lake up major tax reform primarily lo give industry in- cenlivcs lo boost production and jobs. One nf Ihe first major bills Million School Bond Opening Set Tuesday By GARY BALDRIDOE Reporter-News Staff Writer Abilene public schools will move one slcp closer Tuesday lo SG million 'worth of school inv p r o v e m e n I s when bids are opened on bonds approved lasl Oclober. School board members will meet al a.m. Tuesday in Ihe board room of the Adminis- tration Huilding, 842 N. Mock- ingbird. About 800 prospective buyers were mailed bond sale informa- tion, Supl. A. E. Wells said. BY A MARGIN of more lhan Iwo lo one, school district tax- payers voted last Oclober for school improvement projects in three categories: A expenditure for Ihe addition of cighl classrooms each lo Taylor, Jackson, Re- agan and Lee E I e m e n I a r y Schools, additional bus sheds, and girls' gyms and vocational Some 'Exorcist' Events 'Happened' Some of the things de- picted in the novel and film The Exorcist' about a young girl's demonic possession really happened, according lo o Jesuit- report and a Lutheran minister who was there. Story, Pg. 7C. NEWS INDEX Amusements............. 7C Business Mirror...........5A Bridge..................SC Clossified..............3-7C Comics 7B Fdiloriols 4A Horoscope............... 8B Hospital Patients 3A Obituaries 8A Sporls 1-2C To Your Good Hcallh...... SB TV Loa 7C TV Seoul 7C Women's NCV.S.......... 3B buildings at Jefferson, Lincoln and Franklin Junior High Schools. A expenditure to air condition those school build- ings which are not air condi- tioned. A expenditure to renovate Franklin, Jefferson and Lincoln Junior High Schools, and Alta Vista, College Heights, Fair Park, Locust, Mil- am, Travis, Valley View and Woodson Elementary Schools and raze Central Elementary School.; JOE W. SMITH, the school district's fiscal agent, has fig- ured that Ihe million bond issue will cost no more than a 10-ccnl lax increase. The school district currently has a tax rate of a year, divided into for Ihe soneral fund and .10 cents for Ihe interest and sink- ing fund. After'the board authorizes the wining bidder on Tuesday, the bond attorney will study Ihe. agreement and Ihe Texas Edu- cation Agency will consider il. The Slale Hoard of Education is entitled by law lo a 10-day op- lion lo all bonds, and a waiver of (his option is required before bond sales. The-n Ihe bonds will be printed and senl lo the buyer or buyers, legally selling in motion (he ne- gotiation of construction con- tracts. By mid-February, Wells estimates; contracts will be signed wilh architects. ON TUESDAY, board mem- bers will be considering bids on terms of an 18-yciir pay back program on tlie bonds, with a 15-year par option to repurchase Ihe bonds. First.National Bank in Dallas and Citizens National Bank in Abilene have been des- ignated as fiscal agents for llus bond transactions. The school district has a "high-grade'' credit rating of AA with Standard and Poor's Corp. and an A-l rating wilh Moody's Investors Service. The A'-l ralijig from Moody's was up from the A rating assigned Ihe district 12 years ago. 'Hie upgrading, said Board President C. G. Whilten, will "of course hejp us on' Ihe bond sales in securing a lower interest r.ilc." likely to be produced this year is one to overhaul private pen- sion systems and guarantee thai workers will gel Iheir lien- efits when they retire. The Senate already has passed ils pension reform bill and Ihe House is expected to acl on its version in about three weeks. A scries of public were first up on the House cal- endar [his week and the Senate was lo jiiarl debate on the au- thorization for dams, Hood con- trol and other public works projects across the country. 20% Chance Of Rain Forecast Forecasters at the National Weather Service said Monday thai a Pacific cold front is mov- ing over Arizona and New Mexi- co toward Texas, touching off widely scatlered showers. The slow-moving front, said forecasler Jack Schnabel, ac- counts for Ihe 20 per- cent chance of rain in the forecast. MEANWHILE- the cooler air from Ihe Dakota plains reported Friday has apprenlly "fizzled Schnabel said, and no longer haunls Ihe weather map. However, Schnabel. said cold air is still poised to the north of the Dakolas and could make up ils mind to drift down later this week. "I wouldn't definitely say we will get this cold air as far south as Schnabcl added. WEATHER U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Weather Service (Wealher imp. Pq. 1A1 ABILENE AND (40-mile radius) Increasing cloudiness Itxlay be- mostly cfcucfy (aniihl. wj'lh a slighl chance of I h under showers Tues- day Warm loday and mild toninht and Tuesday. Soulhivly winds a1 E lo 15 mpk, becoming northerly al 10 1o 70 mpfi. Tucstlov- foday in upper Uovs loniqhl in Ifit neper 3fls. High lamorrcw in Iftc low 60s, Probability o> precipitation Tuesday ?9 per ccnl- High and low for 14 hours eroding 9 a.m 64 41. High and low same date last year: S> By GEOIUJE HSI'EK Associated Press Wriler SAIGON (API The'South Vietnamese twice asked the Uniled Stales 7tli Fleet lo inter- vene in Ihe bailie with the Chi- nese for the Parsed- Islands but were turned down, official South Vietnamese sources said today. But Ihe informants said lhal U.S. planes flew reconnaissance missions over the islands today at (he request of the South Viei- namese government. 'Hie sources said an Ameri- can civilian was missing on one of Ihe islands, which were over- run by Chinese forces Sunday, lie was nol immediately idenii- fied, ths informants said.he was a former U.S. Jfarine offi- cer. Tlie Soulh Vietnamese gov- ernment has conceded military victory to China in their dispute over the Paracels, and called for an emergency meelins of the. .United Nations Security Council lo plead ils case. Foreign Minister Viiimg Van Bac sent Secretary. General Kurt Waldheim a note asking thai the mailer be put before Ihe council. Nguyen Him Clii, Soulh Vietnam's observer at UN headquarters in N e York arranged a meeting wilh Gon- xalo Facio of Cosla Rica, llm council president tor January. The Chinese Foreign-Ministry in a statement' said "due pun- ishment" had been, moled oul Id Vietnamese "forces sent lii Ihe Paracels, which the slalenienl said "have al- ways been China's (errilory." "The personnel of Ihe other side whom we have captured in Hie fight for self-defense will be repatrialed al an appropriate Ihe statement said. 71 did not say how jnanv were captured. T h c Saigon military com- mand said a Chinese amphibi- ous force of about 500 men seized the last of the disputed coral islands in the South China Sea on Sunday, overrunning 150 Vietnamese troops after a two-day air, sea and ground battle. "IV seems the bailie is fin- ished. For (he lime being, we are no longer taking any action lo defend Ihe Saigon's chief military spokesman, Col. Le Tning Ilien, said. Hien claimed lhal eight Chinese and Soulh Vietnamese navy ships were sunk or damaged in the Hatlle and nioi-c than 225 Soulh Vietnamese soldiers and sailors are missing. lie said one Vietnamese pa- trol craft was sunk by. radar- guided missiles and the fate of the 82 crewmen was not known. One'destroyer, .one culler and anDlhcr palrol craft suffered light lo moderate damage and relumed, lo Da Nang on Sun- day, .he reported. Mien said 11 South Vietnam- ese were known killed, 35 were wounded, and Ihe 150 troops who were overrun are missing. Two Chinese patrol craft, each wilh a crew of 50 to 60 men, were sunk and Iwo others were heavily damaged, Hien claimed. The Pnracels arc about 250 miles east of Ihe Vielnamese coast and 175 miles south of Ihe Chinese island of'Hainan.- Tlie islands are not known to have any permanent inhabitants and were long thought lo be nf -val- ue only'as' a source of turtles, crabs, bird eggs, guano and listi. Bui now the possibility of offshore oil deposits has given them new value. The Vielnamese claim to the islands goes back lo Ihe Anna- mile empire, while China says Chinese fishermen .established her lille in the 15th century. The Japanese occupipd the islands from 1939 to 1945, -and the 1951 San Francisco peace Irealy recognized Ihem as Chi- nese'territory. Kissinger Peace Trip Report Due ligh c _ -d 21. Sunset lasl nighl: sunsef (onighf: today: By BARRY SCHWEII) Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP) Sec- retary of Slale Henry A. Kissin- ger returned early Tuesday from a Irip lhal pro- duced a disengagement agree- ment between Israel and Egypt as well as "real progress" in advancing a similar pact be- Iwcen Israel and Syria. most important he said, as Ihe 11-day journey ended before dawn, "is that il may have marked the restora- tion of normal human relations in the area." Kissinger is due to report lo President Nixon and lo Con- gressional leaders later in the day. He said he was pleased to have seen "thai the Uniled Slates is the country that is trusted by both sides lo repre- sent Iheir point of view accu- raloly." Heforc heading for home via London Kissinger brought to Is- rael what he termed "a num- ber of very constructive sug- gestions" from President Hafez Assad of Syria lhal could lead lo negotiations belwecn the two October War foes. Kissinger also told Israeli lenders that Syria may be will- ing lo turn over a list of war prisoners and lo permil visits by Ihe International fled Cross if Ihe talks make substantial progress. Privately, U.S. officials be- lieve that a relaxation on the Syrian front is vital for further accords belwecn Egypt and Is- rael since Egyptian President Anwar Sadat, for political rea- sons within the Arab world, cannot afford to move too far ahead of the oilier Arab stales in dealing with Israel. The Israeli government is 10 study Assad's ideas and then give its response lo Kissinger. Pregnancy Rule Struck Down By VEIINON A. CUIDIIY Jr. Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP) The Supreme Court today struck down rules lhal force pregnant school teachers off the job re- gardless of Iheir individual ability to conlinue work. Tlie 7 lo 2 decision represent- ed a victory for advocates of equal rights for women. The pregnancy case involved rules from school systems in Ohio and Virginia which forced pregnant school teachers lo leave Ihe classroom al the fourth and fifth months of their pregnancy, respectively. The majority conc'.udcd "thai neither Ihe necessity for con- limiily of inslruction nor Ihe slate interest in keeping physi- cally unfit teachers out of the classroom can justify the sweeping mandatory leave regulations lhal Ihe Cleveland and Chesterfield County (Va.) school hoards have adopled." Writing for (he majority, Jus- lice Potter Stewart said Hint while the rcgulalin'ns doubt represent a good-failh allcmpl lo achieve a laudable goal, Ihey cannot pass muster under the duo process clause on the Ulh Amendment because they cm- ploy iiTcbullable presumptions thai unduly pciinlixc a female teacher for deciding lo bear a child." One question in Ihe case was whether Ihe rule on pregnancy constituted an impermissable classification on the basis of sex-. The majority did nol place its reasoning under Ihe equal pro- tection clause of the 141 h Amendment which could con- demn such discrimination, lialhcr. the majority said that arbitrary cutoffs of employ- ment for pregnant teachers denies Ihem due process of law. Stewart was jointed by Jus- tices William J. Hrcnnan Jr., Ityron R. While, Thurgood Mar- shall, Harry A. lilackmun, Wil- liam 0. Douglas, and Lewis F. Powell Jr. Chief Justice War- ren E. Burger and Justice Wil- liam II. Uhcnquisl dissented. Powell said he agreed wilh the result bill believed Ihe cu.se should have Ihe question tion. been decided on of equal protec- The majority, al I h e same time, said lhal school boards need not adopt an individ- ualized delerminalion on Ihe fitness of each individual preg- nant teacher. "We are not dealing in Ihese cases wilh maternity leave regulations requiring a termi- nation of employment at some firm dale during Ihe last few weeks of Stewart said. "We therefore have no occa- sion lo decide whether such regulations mighl be jusllfied by considerations nol in Ihe he H   

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