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Abilene Reporter News: Thursday, January 17, 1974 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - January 17, 1974, Abilene, Texas                                Abilene "WITHOUT. OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR COES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT Byron )3KD YEAH, NO. 214 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79G04, THURSDAY IOVENING, JANUARY 17, PAGES IN FOUR SECTIONS Associated Press (fP) By BLUE IIUCKER Fewer Homes in U. S. Heated by Electricity An article in [he morning paper said one out of three homes in Britain arc healed wilh electricity. I wonder vvnal percentage or households heat with electricity in Abilene iind in the U.S. A. According to an Electric Kncrgy Asso- ciation study in 1972, G.3 million dwellings are electrically heated in the U. S. or about 9.4 percent. In Abilene, according to West" Texas 'Utilities, at the end of November 1073, approximately residential cus- tomers (including apartment healed Ilieir homes electrically. This is about 5 per :ent of the dwelling units in Abilene. Q. Can anyone here translate Chinese and-or Japanese? A. It.so happens Connie Chin, who is secretary lo oui- editor, speaks Chinese and so docs her husband, who is from Peking. They'll be glad to help you translate your letter or whatever from Chinos? to English. Possibly they can help yon with the Japa- nese also, but Ihey're not loo sure about Iliat. Q. I worked in Arkansas tor two mouths last fall. Where do 1 write to find out how to file for a stale Income lax refund'.' A. Try the Bureau of Taxation and Reve- nue, Little Rock, Ark. Since Ihey're the ones that have your money, they'll determine whether or not you can have it back. Q. I'm still M'altlng for the answer to my question. Where is it? I asked you lo mail II, I do not want It printed in he paper since we no longer subscribe. With prices so high we've had lo cut down an everything so we no longer lake the paper. We miss It hut we don't have the money to buy It.. A. We hear this so often maybe it's lime for a little commercial. Qneslions submitted lo Action Line are answered only in. Ihe column in the paper, with few exceptions. If we spent all our lime doing private re- search, how would we ever get a column written? Anyway, a subscription lo a newspaper can save you money. You're missing some money-saving coupons, notices of special prices on groceries, tires, clothing, etc. and the used items individuals offer for sale at low prices in Hie Family Weekender section of Classified. Some people will pay a quarter for a cup of coffee and think nothing of it, yet hesitate spending a dime for the daily paper when it bas so much more lo offer. Consider the information on current events, money-sav- ing lips and recipes, movie and TV sched- ules, picture features, comics, puzzles. And don't forget the specialty columns. Well, you're missing Dear Abby, the editori- als, Art Buchwald, Kalharyn Dufl's Vage One and your answer in Action Line! All this information and entertainment is delivered to your home and you don't even pay for delivery service. Truly, when you analyze the contents there are no bargains equal to a daily newspaper. Q. Way hack In the Gill grade I learned how to convert Fahrenheit lo Centigrade hul as wilh all Ihe Infonna- lon I learned in Ihe lith grade, I forgot. Can you help my feeble mind? A. Hardin-Simmons Math Professor Anne Bentlcy says Fahrenheit is to nine- fifths centigrade, then add 32. Or lo check it oul, use 100 as cenligrade temperature and this formula: nine-fifths times 100 plus 32 equals 121 F. Cenligrade is equal to five- ninths Address questions lo Acllon Line, Box 30, Ahllcnc, Texas 73604. Names will nol he used bill questions must he signed and addresses given. Please include tel- ephone numbers if possible. FBI Enters Tape Gap Investigation Answer Just The "Uncle Sam" on this billboard need only to look beneath his sign for the answer lo his ques- tion as rivers and creeks overflowed along Interstate 3 near Olympia, .Wash. (AP Wivephoto) in Earth Slide By THE ASSOCIATED PIIESS Nine men arc missing after a rock and earth slide smothered a telephone company building in Oregon, and two children drowned in Northern California. The men were working in a Pacific Northwest Bell Co. structure near Canyonville in southwestern Oregon Wednesday night when Ihe landslide roared off a mountain, pushed the Texas Drilling Upswing Seen AUSTIN, Tex. (AP) The Texas Railroad Commission ex- tended the, statewide 100 per cent oil allowable lo February today amid chairman Jim drilling is. on Ihe upswing. Fe- hurary will be the 23rd con- secutive month of wide-open oil production in Texas. I.angdon said he had talked with oil men in Wesl Texas, and they said thai drilling in the Odessa-Midland area is acceler- ating so rapidly that it ranks with the boom limes of the 1950s. "There is a decided increase in drilling" in other areas of the stale, Langdon said, despite shortages of pipe, gas and oil field workers. By developing all of its fuel sources, Langdon Ihe United Stales has .''far more energy fuels, than Ihe Arab na- tions have." He said indications are that Arab oil may go up to a barrel and at thai cost, the United Slates could compcle on Campus House Trailer Cuts Cost of Vandalism ELK GROVE, Calif A California school adminis- trator says he has come up with 3 simple way to virtually eliminate school vandalism: Keep somebody living oti Hie campus in a house trailer. It's working so well in this Sacramento suburb Hint lax- payers are saving Ihe or so a year they once lost lo thcfl and vandalism. Officials say there also has been a 25 per cent drop in insurance rales for fire, Ihefl and mali- cious mischief. But even more than that is saved, says 0. Mearl Cuslcr; the -Elk Grove administrator who came up with Ihe idea for Ihe district. hurt iusl as much, and maybe more lhan the dol- lar value of Ihe losl equipment was (he fact it often took five or six months lo replace Ihe equipment in Ihe process the educational process was he said. Sherman and Delia Sharils live al Ihe Pleasant Grove Klcmenlary School. Sliarils is a postal employe, Mrs. Sharits says Ihe chil- dren call her "Delia" and help lend her vegetable garden. Two college football players, Howard Blair, 20, and Mike Roles, 19, watch over Kirchga- ter Elementary School. "Kids set off Ihe fire alarm once in 'a while, but there's been nothing stolen or any- thing like that in the seven months Mike and I have been Blair said. "Actually, the only problem I've had just came up. Sonic kids were playing around and they look some wires out of my he said. Rliiir nnd Holes nllcml Con- sumes nivcr Community Col- lege. the world market at "half the price." Texas' crude oil slocks as of Jan.' 4 totaled 86.3 million bar- rels, a of 3.7 million barrels from a year ago, Lang- do said. In setting the 100 per cent- al- lowable, the commission once again restricted production in the East Texas and Kelly-Sny- der fields lo 86 per ceflt and Ihe Tom O'Connor field to 70 per cent. Major buyers of Texas crude oil asked'for barrels a day next month, a decrease of from January. Nominations by major pur- chasers of Texas crude oil for February, in barrels per day, with any change from January in parentheses; Amoco (plus Atlantic Richfield Chevron Cities Service Continental Diamond Shamrock Exxon (minus Gulf 193.000 Mobil Phillips 115.000 Shell Sun (plus Texaco Unio of California structure into a creek and then buried il in mud. Authorities moved heavy equipment lo the scene lo dig for possible survivors, then abandoned Ihe rescue, attempt temporarily until geologists could gauge the danger of fur- ther slides. The Oregon landslide in the wake of heavy rains ami an early snow meJi that sent al- ready swollen streams in many areas of the Pacific Northwest surging lo new highs. The storm left its soggy im- pact on western Montana, Ida- ho, northeastern Washington, Oregon and Northern California. Dams broke and mudslides blocked highways. Hundreds of families were forced from Iheir homes by floodwalers. Al Myers Flat, on a branch of the Eel River in Northern California, 14-year-old Jimmy Moore and his 12-year-old sis- ter, Kalhy, died Wednesday when a dam created by a log- jam burst and surging water swept them from 'the backyard of Iheir home. Sheriff's U. liobert Williams said the youngsters were help- ing Iheir father, Emery, move properly lo higher ground when Ihey were swept to their deaths. Moore escaped. His wife was in the family home, which was torn loose by the swirling wa- ter. Khc escaped death when the house washed back lo shore after being carried some 75 out into the raging stream. Eight counties in Idaho were declared a disaster area. The Idaho mining district of Cocur d'Alenc was virtually isti- lated. Dams burst. Water blocked highways. At least 000 persons were evacuated from their homes. Fifteen persons were report- ed trapped by high water on a bridge over the north fork of the Coeur D'Alene river in Ida- ho.-A major bridge over Ihe south fork of the Coeur d'Alene collapsed, isolating hundreds of persons. The world's 'largest silver mine, ironically named the Sun- shine Mine, was shut down as power was cut and a nearby dam broke. In Idaho's Homier Counly, au- thorilies said nearly every area road was washed out. Six coun- ty bridges collapsed and fami- lies in outlying areas were evacuated. Tn Western Oregon, hit bv the worst flooding in 10 years, (here was some relief from high water Wednesday as the rain slackened and rivers re- ceded. At leasl 250 families had fled Iheir homes. Storm warnings were in ef- fect on the Oregon coast for wind gusts up to 70 miles per hour. Wind speeds cif m.p.h. w r r c clocked Wednesday at Livingston, Mnnl., and Lake Tahoc, Calif. By DONALD M. HOT1I11EHG Associalcd Press Writer WASHINGTON1 (AP) The Federal Bureau of Invesliga- lion has entered the investiga- tion into who could have pushed the buttons that erased a pin lion of a taped presiden- tial conversation: Confirmation that the FBI had entered the probe came from spokesman Robert Frank, who said Ihe agency had been asked to investigate by special Watergate prosecu- tor Leon Jaworski. Meanwhile, a court inquiry into the tape erasure contin- ued. Prosecutors, armed with a technical reporl on how Ihe 18.5-minute gap o c c u r r e d, looked lo additional testimony for answers. Two more Secret Service officials involved in keeping track of the White House tapes and recording equipment were scheduled to-testify today in federal court. The Washington bureau of Wcslingliquse Broadcasting Corp. said thai the Fill probe had the approval of Flif chief Clarence Kelley. W-cslmghousc said Ihe investigation would involve President Nixon and his closest personal aides. In Ihe court inquiry. Stephen B. Hull, special assistant lo- P r c s i d c n t Nixon, testified Wednesday that he knew of only five people who-ever had possession of the tape of a- June 20, conversation be- tween Nixon and H. It. llalde- 111 an. He said they were himself, the President, presidential secretary Hose Mary Woods. White liouse lawyer .T. Fred lluzhardt and Gen. John Ben- nett, a presidential aide. Al Ihe close of Wednesday's hearing U.S. District Judge John .1. Sirica said he hoped all testimony would be com- pleted Friday when, the techni- cal experts return lo be cross- examined by While House law- yers. Then, il will be up to the judge lo decide what happens nexl and Sirica said, for Ihe first, time in open court, thai he expects his decision to in- clude whether or nnt Ihe mys- tery of the obliterated tape should be referred lo a grand jury. make lhal decision in due Sirica said. Later, he declined lo specu- late on just how long it might take him lo decide what to do. On Tuesday, technical ex- perls r e o r I e d that Ihe 18.5 minute segment of the I ape had been erased during a scries of between five and nine actions on a llhcr 5000 taire recorder. Each time that the machine was restarted and slopped again someone had to push a button, the re- port saiil. Testimony by the experts, and a Secret Service official Wednesday, and previous tes- timony by Miss Woods pointed lo Oct. I as Ihe date on which a portion of the erasure oc- curred. Miss Woods has lesli- fied that on Oct. 1 she accl-' dentally pushed the wrong but- ton while transcribing Ihe June 20 tape." She -also said that in going back1 to listen to the tape after the accident she heard a couple of minutes of buzzing and no conversation. Those few minutes are in- cluded within the 18.5-minutes that the experts say were erased. They also said their tests indicated the .-erasure was done on the same ma- chine used by Miss Woods. Wednesday's testimony also disclosed thai' Miss Woods' Uher machine was purchased new Oct. 1 and brought by the Secret Service to Bull who took it to Miss Woods about p.m.. 'testified to ;Sims, head of the tech- nical service's- division of the conflicted Miss Woods' earlier testimony dial she had been working with-that-recorder for two to two and one-half hours before Ihe accident. She had said she told the President of il at about p.m. and said that was about five-minutes after Itie incident.- Warming Trend May Soon Taller Warm temperatures should continue at least through Fri- day, but forecasters at the Na- tional Weather Service say Ihe trend may begin to falter by Friday night as the weather pendulum begins to swing back to the cooler side. "We are looking with interest al a Pacific cold'front which js Irying lo -work Ms way across Hie said forecaster Jack Schnabel. v SC1INABEL INDICATED the front, severely weakened from its journey lo Texas, probably would not cause any major weather changes. lie said th'e front's passage would lie enough to drop temperature "a few de- however. The atmosphere is continuing it's pendulum-like recovery from ihe cold weather of past weeks-, he said. BulT he indicat- ed, this "pendulum" may have readied the peak of ils arc. WEATHER U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Wealher Service (Wealher Mop, Pg, 3A) ABILENE AND VICINITY (JO-mife ra fair today. Clear to parjly cloudy tonight and Friday. Continued worm temparaiurev Southerly winds at 10 lo 70 ipph. High this In Ihe low 70s.- Low lonlghl En Ihe mid High Friday in the upper 60s. High and lor 74 hours endirq f a.m.: 7? and Hkjh antf low same dale fosl year: 69 and 53. Sunsel IASI niqhl: sunrise today: iusnel lonighl: Court Merger Plan Brings Split Workshop Aims At Voter Help Confused about voting procedure? Or, interested in becoming an election work- er? The Abilene League of Women voters is sponsoring a workshop to help create a pool of trained election workers, ond to inform vot- ers about proper election procedures. Story and art on Page 1-B. Amusemenls 6B Bridge 5A. Business Mirror 1C Business Holes......... 5C Classified..............4-7D Ccmics 7B Editorials 4A Horoscope 2 A Hosnilal Polients 7C Obituaries 3D Snorts To Your Gso.H Hcolih..... 7D TV Leg Women's News 2.3B By ROBERT HEAHI) Associalcd Press Writer AUSTIN, Tex. (AP) The five judges of the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals are split 2--2-1 on a proposal lo merge their court wilh Ihe Texas Su- preme Court. I'reslilin? Judge John V. On- ion Jr. and Judge W. A. Mor- rison told the Constitutional Convention's Judiciary Com- mittee Wednesday they oppose the merger. Judge Truman Roberts said he supported the merger and that Judge Wendell Odom, who could not altend the hear- ing because his wife had sur- gery Tuesday, also favored il. Judge Leon Douglas ex- pressed no preference, saying he could work effectively ei- ther way. The merger is proponed in the document recommended by the Conslilulional Revision Commission. The five criminal court judges and the nine jus- tices of Ihe Texas Supreme Court would sit as a H-judge court. As judges died or re- lired, no replacement would be made until after Ihe num- ber had dropped to nine. "We're .still going lo bo the forgotten Onion said. There is an attitude thai "criminal cases are not all lhat he said. Morrison said, "In my con- sidercd judgment, you have the strongest appellate court in criminal cases in Ihe United Slates." !Ie said a merger would lead lo a situation where criminal cases would be relcgaled lo "Friday after- noon." A judge whose docket in- cludes a million civil suit and a criminal case involving "some underprivileged inifor- lunate whose constitutional righls arc being deprived" will concentrate on the civil suit, Morrison said. The actual priority should be Ihe other way around, he said. Roberts agreed that his court was treated as a step- child, bill he said he favored the merger for thai very rea- son. lie has warned repeatedly, Hobi'il said, that tin- criminal justice ssyteni of Texas is heading toward a scandal be- cause the court's workload is staggering. When lie talks with people in th big law firms of the state, they agree some- thing should be'done, he said, but that's all the action they will take. "If the lop courl of this statJ is interested in both civil and criminal law, Ihe big law firms will gel Roberts said. All live judges supported the CUC proposal lhat would al- low the legislature to give courts of civil appeals crimi- nal jurisdiction. And an appeal from that intermediate level should be possible only if the lop court permitted it. All criminal appeals'today go directly from the 'district courts to the Texas Court uf Criminal Appeals, which is re- quired by law lo write an opinion .in each case. There also are four commissioners on Hie court who help' write In .Ifl72, ..the. criminal. wrote opinions, conv pared wi'ih 123 by the Texas Supreme-Coin I. Last year; the Criminal'1 Court' wrote opinions. Onion alone wrote 267 opin- ions in" 1972, and Rep. DeWiU Hale of Corpus Christi, chair-; man of the committee, said lhat was almost one opinicf for each working day (if lie year, lie asked bow Onion able to do il, "Well, there are there arc 
                            

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