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Abilene Reporter News: Monday, January 14, 1974 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - January 14, 1974, Abilene, Texas                                "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR COES WE SKETCH YOUR; WORLD EXACTLY AS I F 9SRD YEAR, NO. 211 PHONE G73-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, MONDAY 14, IN TIIKEK SECTIONS Associated I'rea By EL1.IE RLCKER Permission Needed For Another Doctor Is II (rue (here Is a'nosplUil policy 'qr. policy among (he doctors that says a nurse cannot 'physician 'when jhc patient's physician is mil at town, and the alternate physician can'l be found1.' What is a person supposed (o both doctors arc unavailable? The ''nurse in charge told1 us her hands were Hedj she could not call any doctor whose nanie.tiad been lett [on call by the patient's, doctor. Because no physician was available lo prescribe or administer oxygen, a patient spent vtuorc than several hours in extreme ng- The suffering was inhumane ana needless; A Ihird-ddctor.-called by Ihe palfcnl's family, said, "I will nol talk lo yon; if the nurse needs-rue, she can 'call me." "We were (old thai, it the patient had been at home Instead or in (he hospital, the family .would be free to call in an- other doctor, it seems a patient who's In agony shjould not be denied a doctor just because he's in Ihc hospital. Docs a nurse nol have the right to relieve hn- 'man suffering by pelting a doctor? If Ihc answer Is this ought lo be -changed. A. Once a doctor is employed on a case, medical ethics require other doctors to stay out of it except in cases of life or death says the immediate past-president of the Taylor-Jones Medical Society. Doctors can't always be available; they do liavc private lives. If they arc not going.lo be available For a period, they ask another doctor lo handle llieir cases for them, and Ihey posl Ih.ern on critical cases Ihcy have- al Ihe time. There is no rule written down in black and while, says Dr. B. J. Eslcs. But Ihe nurse is not allowed lo call another doclor, she docs npi have Ihe aulhnrilv to do go without Ihe permission of one of the Iwo attending phy sicians. If the' nurse determines il's a mat ler of life and death, she can take mailers Into her own hands and pajjc any doctor in the hospital. Doctors are supposed to keep Iheir where- abouts known at all limes.unless they have another doclor filling in for them. Dr. Estcs said Ihe attending physician must be respon- sible for leaving an alternate in charge of his patienl whom he can rely on. Tlie alter- nate physician was also at fault for "being out of pocket for loo long a Dr. Esles said. Q. We have fine child horn Sept. H, 1344, and one born Aug. 14, 1056. I can'l remember what [Jay it was and I'd sure like to know. A. Sept. 14, 1044, was on a Thursday; Aug. 14, 1956, was a Tuesday. Most World Alma- nacs contain perpetual calendars .Hiving this kind of information and the cily library has several almanacs, in case anyone else wants to pinpoint a date. Q. What's the legal limit on the amount of beer you can make al home? .1 got a kil for Christmas and don't want lo gel hnsted. A. You miglil want to think about ex- changing your gift since 'you can't legally brew up a sinsle drop. Even for your own. personal use.- The Chairman of Texas Alco- holic Beverage Commission, Tom Gordon, tells us if you had a winemaking kit you could make up to 200 gallons of wine every year by paying a ?l deposil and indicating what you plan lo do with 11. Bill, in Texas, brewing your own beer is a no-no. Q. Please advise an blc country gal on Ihe customary amount of tips pivcn In a first class restaurant In a big city. A. Fifteen-per cent is.pretty standard all over the country, according to a travel ygcnl and the manager of a large local restaurant. Of course it's up lo you, if you feel service was extra special, 20 per cent is acceptable.-But you may see a waitress frown if you leave less than 10 per cent. Address questions (o Action Line, Hox 30, Abilene, Texas 7M04. Names will no( be used but questions must he signed and addresses given. include (cl- ephonc numbers If possible. Minority Business Goals Explained Federal and state assist- ance 'specifically for minor- ity businessmen is a rela- tively recent development. Two officials visiting Abi- lene explain their goals and methods in contacting and helping minority enterpris- es. Story on Pg. IB. Amusements ,8C Bridqe 4B Business Mirror 5B Clossified 4-flC Comics 7B Fdiroriols 6A Hcroscooc 4A Hosoitol Policnls 2B Obituaries 3A 1-3C Tn Your Gcod Hcollh 5A TV Loq BC TV Scout 8C Womi-n's NMVS 2-38 Ky TOM STUCKEV Associated Press Writer ANNAPOLIS, Md! A special three-judge panel rec- ommended today that former Vice President Spirb T. Ag'new be disbarred from the practice of law in Maryland. T. h ,'c .'tlircc Circuit Court judges said lhat sion of income, ackrioyi'P edged in a no-conicst plea, was "deceitful and. dishonest" and "strikes al Ihe heart of the bas.- ic object of the legal profes- sion "We shall therefore rccqm-. mend ..his disbarment..! We see' no extenuating, circumstances allowing a lesser a 14-page recommendation said. The recommendation; goes to Maryland Courl of Appeals, which makes the final decision on whether lo bar Agncw from the practice of law. Disciplinary actions were filed stale i bar .associ- ation .lasl November after" Ag- new .pleaded no contest to ,a federal tax charge and resigned from Ihe vice presidency. The bar association had. asked'the. three'judges to dis-1 bar Agnevv.' The''former president, however; had asked the panel ,.lo merely suspend him from practicing law, ar- guing that his misconduct'was connected witli his duties as a lawyer. Aghew lolrt the Judges that he had at no tinie enriched himself at the expense .ol his .public Irusl.and that there was noth- ing lo indicate that he would nol faithfully and honestly rep- resent his clients as a lawyer But. Circuit Courl Judges One of the First One of the first 55 miles-per-liour speed .limit signs goes up along Interstate 20 near Abilene. Although the signs should he up within the next highway de- partment officials said speeds will nott be enforced until Jan. 20 syhen the new limits officially take effect. technician Heriry .C. Pounds still must take down the'night speed limit sign, which will he repainted with the new numbers and stored for future use: The 12-county district-around. Abilene.has about 280 of the signs to be" changed. (Staff Photo by Don Dlakley) 5 Abilene Student Singers Named to All-State Choir Five Abilene studenls were chosen as members of the All- Stale Choir, in audilions'held at Tarlclon Slate University in Ste- phenville-Saturday. They were named to the choir from among 130 contestants in an area which included Dallas, Forl Worth, Wichita Falls, and San Angclo. Selected lo 'All-Stale Choir were Jill King, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. liay King, 3602 I.igus- trum; junior at Cooper. High; first alto; Rickey Ilurke, son of Mr. and Mrs. Arnold L. Burke, 2328 S. 33rd; sophomore al Cooper; first lenor; Dennis Knnkel, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Knnkcl, 358 S. lllh; senior at Cooper; second tenor; Bruce Cain, son of Mr. and Mrs. L. W. Cain, Box 451; senior al Cooper: second bass; John'Grasham, son of Mr. and Mrs. William Grasham, 2600 Garfield, senior at Abilene High, second bass; w Disbarment Shirley K. Jones, Ridgcly' I'. Jlclvin and William.. II. McCullough said Agnew's cpn- ducl was harmful to Ihc proper administration of justice. "In our l li e prop- er administration of justice, Ihe proper respect of the courl for itself: ami a proper regard for Ihe integrity of the profession compel us to conclude thai the respondent is unfit (o continue as ajmcmhcr of the bar of Ibis the recommendation said.; The three judges said their recommendation was based solely on Agnew's no-conlcst plea lo the lax charge. They said Ilicy did nol lake into con- sideration any of Ihe allega: lions made by the Justice De- partment' in Agnew's U.S. Dis- trict Courl appearance last Oct. JO. In a 40 page statement of evi- de-nce, federal prosecutors had alleged thai Agnew was in- volved in a system of kickbacks lo Maryland politicians from architects and engineers doing non-bid government business. Although Aghew has nol practiced law in Maryland since being elected to public of- fice, il is Ihe only slale where he was a member of Ihe bar. lie appealed to Ihc judges at Ihc hearing last month not to deprive him of his means of earning a living by recom- mending disbarment. The recommendation of Ihe three judges was lo be filed to- day with Hie Court of Appeals wliich can either accept the dis- barment recommendation, re- duce the pcnajly lo suspension or reprimand Agnew. Court to Rule on Florida Free Space Law By.VONON A. (iUIDKV Jr. Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) 'The Supreme Court loday agreed to consider whether states can de- mand 'thai newspapers give .free-space to political candi- dates for replies lo editorial at- tacks. The justices accepted the case for argument on the mer- its but lefl themselves the op- lion of deciding, after hearing Ihe arguments, lhal they do not have jurisdiction in the case. The issue reached the jus- tices in a case from Florida in which Ihe stale supreme court upheld a 1013 stale law requir- ing lhat newspapers which "as- sail" Ihe personal character or official record of a candidate must print his reply with equal prominence. However, the justices refused to consider a plea from another Florida newspaper, publishing firm that a former public offi- cial' suing it for libel' be re- quired lo make a case for mal- ice before being granled access .to confidential dala. The Supreme Courl refused to review a: slate court decision in a pending lawsuit against Hie Palm Beach' Newspapers Inc. lhal Ihe publishing firm turn over confidential financial records for inspection by a for- 'Present' Recalled By Commissioners alternate positions. First alter- nates are Debbie Elliotl, daugh- ter 'Of Mr. and Mrs. B. T. El- liott, 4133 Brook Hollow; senior at Cooper; first alto; George Hogan, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hogan, 4309 Mary Lou I.ane. ninth grade student at Mann Junior bass. "This is Ihe third audition which the- students have gone through in.order to win this hon- says Mrs. Macon Suni.crlin, choir teacher at Cooper. "Over 50 Abilene studenls en- By HOY A. JONES II Staff Writer One of the "Christina's pre- sents" given new Taylor County employes in December was "re- called" Monday by county com- missioners. That was the effect of (he ac- tion when commissioners delet- ed Ihe portion of a pay 'raise amendment wliich provided for virtual "automatic" raises aflcr months. As a result of Ihc Monday ac- tion, new county, employes will keep one-half of their "Christ- mas present" the starting monthly salary will be a 5.5 per cent increase from the old starting salary of IN TIIEIll Dec. 18 meeting, when they' set the raises, com- missioners removed a 5.5 per cent raise which was automati- WEATHElf U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Weather Scrvici (Wealher Mop Pg, 3B) ABILENE AMD VICINITY Wrnile Monday ollernoon ono" Tuesday, n -I night. Winds norltwcslerlv 6-18 m pti High Monday and Tuesday In Ihe low 70i. nigh' in Ihe low 40s TEMPERATURES Sunday p.m. Monday 35 58 41 6J............ 40 cully given lo 'starling em- aflcr they had completed six months of work for the coun- ty. Instead; Ihcy specified lhal Die; 5.5 per cent raise, lo per-monfh, would be granled af- ler six months, only on Ihe rec- ommendation of the particular employe's department head. County Auditor Gene Brock in- formed commissioners shortly thereafter that Ihe slarling sala- ry policies were creating some problems for department heads. This was due lo the fact lhal some of the new employes afler only seven months on the job could be making within a few dollars of Hie amount paid employes who have been work- ing for Ihc county for more Ihan four years, thanks to Hie In- creased starling salary and six- month raises which, for all practical purposes, would still he ''automatic." 0 1.1) K It EMPLOYEES were getting only Ihc blanket raises given all county employes at Ihe Sec COUNTY, 1'g. IDA, Col. 4 nier Palm Beach County school superintendent. The former school .superinten- dent, l.loyd I1'. Early, has sued the publishing firm over arti- cles published in' the Palm lleach Post and Palm Beach Times in and 1970 .criti- cizing his administration. In other action I h e court: n 1 a r g e d its newly launched reconsideration of an- 'tiobscemly- law by agreeing to hear a case involving Ihe feder- al statute against' mailing scene material.'The court .said it. wiiuld hear the case in tan- an appeal, accepted for review last month, by an Albany, Ga., movie theater op- erator convicted under slate ob- law lor showing the H- pr.aised film Today's agreement' lo hear still iinnlher obscenity case may point lo .still more detailed proiiminccniL'iit.s by the court, which issued a series of rulings last June which gave an exien- sive listing of whal -is punish- ably obscene and gave status new authority to ban certain explicit'.sexual material. to decide whether thousands of Mexican laborers cna loyally commute lo the United States for seasonal.farm work. The court also accepted for review-a companion, case challenging the legality'pf daily commnling 'by Mexican labor- ers. Major news organizations called Ihe Florida court ruling in Ihe right lo reply case an un- precedented- violation of First Amendment rights. The "'orida justices were cquallv Mamanl in seeing their support of the law as ;in en- hancement of First Amendment values for allcilizens at a time of growing conccnlration -in press ownership. The U.S. Supreme Court agreed lo hear Hie case In 8 brief, routine order. It will be argued later this term with a decision expected by June. 5) si M AIIIUCNE ANSI) won two first See STUDENTS, Pg. IDA, Col. 4 High and low (o U 'd J3. High ond low orxJ 27- Suruel lasr nigh sunsel lonig Humidify ol nw> :00 SO :00 55 :CO M 24 hours ending noo me dale lost year: noon: 58 2? in. 'Important' New Watergate Info Cited by Dash Mideast Pact at 'Drafting Stage7 By ISAIillY SCIIWEID Associated Press AVNIer Secretary of Slalc Henry A. Kissinger said loday Egypt and Israel both agree with his ef- forts to gel a Iroop pullback ac- cord on the Suez front and ne- gotiations have progressed lo Ihe dclailed drafling slagc. "Your' secretary of stale, when he sticks his fingers in something, he generally brings il lo a successful Egyplian Foreign Minister Is- mail Fahmy told newsmen. "And 1 Ihink he will this lime." Silling on a sunlit veranda at Aswan in upper Kgypl, Kissin- ger told the newsmen lhat liis shuttling mediation talks with Egyptians anil Israelis am "Ihc toughest I have been in." He and President Anwar Sa- dal set.up joinl learns of drafts- men lo work on Ihc detailed language of an accord lo sepa- rate Israeli and Egyplian forces and ex-, plosive Suez Canal cease-fire lines let! from Ihe October Middle East war. "I Ihink both parlies agree wilh the Kissinger said. Kissinger, who delayed his return lo Israel by several hours, said he probably will sec Sadat again before carrying the proposal'hack lo Jerusalem lat- er loday for consideration by Ihe Israeli cabinet. "H is a very lough he added. "II is hard lo recon- cile." K: Hie (asl (raveling American secrclary said he may Ihcn re- turn lo Aswan in what would be Ihc third time in his current lour to get Sadat's reaction lo any changes Ihe Israelis might propose. The drafling teams were an obvious sign lhal Kissinger Is succeeding in his hectic efforts to bring the Israeli and Egyp- tians together. Unlil this point, he had dis- cussed general ideas and then concrete military positions. Bui now tic will be bringing the Is- raelis both a map pinpoinling proposed withdrawal positions and the phraseology of a draft resolution. "This is the toughest negotia- tions I have been in, ccrlayily the most Kissinger said before Fahmy joined him on the veranda. He paused, then added: like the people involved." The plan as it stands now is generally underslood lo call for Israeli withdrawal eastward into the Sinai more than 20 miles from Ihe Suez Canal. Is- rael also is demanding that F.jiypt thin out its forces eiisl of the canal and pull heavy wcap- ons oul of casl bank territory recaptured in October. This was believed one of Iho key sticking points as Kissinger flew from Israel Sunday nighl lo sec Sadal in Aswan, where lite Egyplian president has been recovering from bron- chilis in the warm, dry air. WASHINGTON (AP) Sam- uel Dash, chief counsel of the Senate Watergate committee, said today the panel had "im- portant now information" and ought to hold further public hearings. Ihink the cummitlcc will follow my recommendation on Hie said Dash during an interview on Ihe NBC-TV "Today Show." lie declined to reveal Ihe.nalnre tif the key in- formation. Dash also denied that Sen. Sam Krvin, D-N.C., the com- mittee chairman, liclievc.s :i compromise can be reached with Ihc While- House on Hie basis of live subpoenaed tape recordings. "There arc a number of tapes and additional documents lhal are absolutely essential In complete our Dash said. Ervin, .tic said, had com- plained about being misquoted concerning Ihc While I louse re- fusal lo surrender items of subpoenaed documcnls' and lapcs. Dash said Ihc live crucial lapcs involving former While House counsel John Dean were necessary ''merely lo form a legal case." lie nolcd thai Ihe issue was ponding before a fed- eral judge. Krvin had been quoted last .week as saying he would wel- come a compromise with the While House on the matter of documents sought by" the com- millce, provided Ihe com- "promise were put in writing. He was later quoted as sny- "If they would surrender these five tapes lo Ihc com- mittee, as Ihc commillce has .requested since last July, we minht be able to drop conversa- tion aboul Ihe other tapes." D.ish did inn rule out the pos- 'sibilily of a compromise wilh 'President Xixon 'about Ihc sur- render of Walcrgalc evidence. "1 think Ihc committee is al- ways willing lo work things out .rather than go lo.court." Dash said. "I'm not sure whal 'the Whim .House is siiying." he added when asked :i'iosi Ihc i-har.cci fin1 a negotiated solution.   

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