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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: December 30, 1970 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - December 30, 1970, Abilene, Texas                                Ibflme "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT Byron WEDNESDAY EVENING, DECEMBER PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS BOTH YEAR. NO. 200 PHONE 6734271 ABILENE. TEXAS. 79604 -25c SUNDAY Auociated Preu (ff) By EI.LIE nUCKER Motorist Questions License Procedure Q. We've been told that the neit time our driver's license comes Dp for renewal we have to take a driving test Just as though we were a beginner. Even thongh we've been driving (or a hundred years, we still have to study "Texai Driver's Handbook" and pass the questionnaire. Is this so? P. S. I'm nol 100 jet just feel II. A. Know the feeling. Jerry Tucker, driver's license examiner, says for a normal renewal all that's necessary Is an eye test. If ycu pass that, your license will automatically be renewed (if your old license is valid, that Now if your Texas license has been expired for over two years, then you'll have to take the complete exam again (both written and Or if you have an out- of-stale license that has expired, you'd be required to take the complete exam. Q. What degree does It take to teach In a state ccllrge? In a Junior slate college? A. Dr. Weldon Barrett, director of student teaching at ACC, says there are no specific degree requirements although most senior colleges prefer someone with a doctorate. He said most colleges like their teachers to have at least 60 semester hours above the bachelor degree. Administrators of junior colleges are not as insistent as the senior colleges at hiring teachers with 60 hours above a bachelor's, but still prefer to hire those who do. Q. Is there a social cloh where middle aged (K through 55) mixed groups meet? I'm a widow, have no children at home and It does get lonely. So far II has been hard to meet men with high morals. Could a club be organized here In Abilene? How would I go about starting one? Or where could I gel help In learning how lo start a club? A. Your question may uncover such a club, but we've not found one as yet. We did, however, find someone who said she'd be tickled to death to help you organize one call Mrs. Worth Baugh at the YWCA, (677- She'll help you get started and the Y will provide a place for you to meet. She, like you, feels there's a need for such an organization. Q. Th: sophomore class at Pecos High School Is Interested In sponsoring Charlie Pride for a show. Can you put me In touch with someone who can give me the Information needed lo contact him or his agent? A. Well hello out there, didn't know we had any readers In Pecos. To find out about Charlie Pride write E. 0. Stacy, Creative Management Associates, 211 East Chicago Ave., Chicago, Illinois 60611. Q. I've seen a car from the City Tax Dept. being driven to work In the mornings. As a taxpayer I'm curious as to the emergencies or after-hours calls lo this department which necessitates that the car be taken home at night. Also, what other departments have this set-up and who determines that a city- owned vehicle In any department will or will not be driven to'and from work? A. The City Manager determines who uses City cars after hours. There are 42 departments and two or three employes in each department are authorized the use of City vehicles after hours. The list, says the City Manager, is reviewed carefully every year by the City Council at budget time, to justify after-hours use. Tax Department employes make calls on weekends and evenings to get inside buildings and houses for appraisal work: If a coupls is working, tax appraisers have to call on them in the evening. Address questions lo Action IJne, Box SO. Ahllenc, Texas Names will not he used but questions must be signed and addresses given. Please Include telephone numbers If possible. MARY JANE FRENCH AND 'DUCKY' rodeo Is the only thing she knows Wlrtputo) Occasionally Rides Broncos Girl Rodeo Rider Miles to Compete WEST PALM fTEACH. Fla. (AP) Mary Jane French is a pretty, red-haired teen-ager who last year hauled her horse, Ducky, miles around the country to compete in 120 ro- deos. "I've been in rcdcn ss long as I can the 16-year- old Fort Myers girl said Tues- day. "1 guess I'll ride as long as I'm able. It's the only thing I know." Last year, Mary Jane was the runner-up for the barrel racing championship of the Interna- tional Rodeo Association. She was in West Palm Beach for the Lorella Lynn Longhorn World Championship Rodeo. On occasion, she finds herself on the back of a bucking bronco or sieer. "I really only do lhat In all- girl she said. "Actual- ly, my event is barrel racing. That's the only thing they let women ride in except in all-girl rodeos." In barrel racing, the contest- ants race against time In a tricky course around three bar- rels. As Mary Jane stood beside Cape Kennedy Bill Appears to Be Dead By DILLON GRAHAM Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP) A bill changing the name Cape Kenne- dy back to Cape Canaveral Is dead for the moment, with Con- gress favoring the memory of the late president over what is said to be local sentiment at the Florida landmark. The joint resolution authoriz- ing the change died in the Sen- ate Interior Committee and is finished, at least for the present session of Congress. Florida Re- publican Sen. Edward J. Gur- ney is expected to try again next year. "There seemed to be some general reluctance to pass the resolution because members thought many would interpret this as a slap at the a committee aide said. Gurney and the other Florida senator, retiring Democrat Spessard Holland, introduced the bill in early 1969, saying the people of Florida wanted the change. Ducky, a lot of admiring glsncs lingered on the girl's trim figure in a purple, se- quined riding outfit. "My father was a bareback bronc rider, and he has a ranch, I guess I've been around horses about all my she says. "1 was riding when I was three and breaking horses when I was seven. I've been riding in rodeos since I was eight." Rodeo life can be a grind, Mary Jane says, adding, "You have to like to travel if you're going to like to mdeo." She is completing high school through correspondence courses. Asked about social life and boyfriends, she replies, "Yeah, I guess I'll marry a rodeo guy. I'm a rodeo person and I'll ride as long as I can. I like rodeo people." Mary Jane has her own car and hauls Ducky along behind in a trailer. She patted the horse and said, "Ducky's part thoroughbred and part quarterhorse. You've got to have at least part quar- terhorse for sense. "Thoroughbreds arc she explained. "Horses have lo have sense lo run the barrels. "I never whip Ducky. Ducky lets me know it when he's mad, and if I whipped him he'd scrub me agninst the barrels." Stays in Iran 6 Years By TOM SEPPY Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP) Bark- ley Moore thinks it's important to "love people1' and as a Peace Corps member he demonstrated that belief by staying at :iis ov- erseas post longer than any of the other volunteers. For six years and four months Moore made Ws home and wnrk the town of Gonbad Kavous in northeastern Iran. And he'd In Iran but for a promise ho made 'n hU parenls, Mr. and MM. Ralph S. Moore of Kv. "I was ready to the 29- year-old Moore said In an inter- view. "I was scheduled to come back last year, I ;jot on the bus and all the people were there. I went a little way and got oil. I had to stay another year. "My parents were upset lhat 1 wasn't coming home. So, 1 prac- tically promised iht-m 1 would return this time but I could have stayed on -jr.d he said. And the people of the town of wanted Moore to remain In continue his wnrk In commu- nity development and teaching English. When he left last mr.nlli-Mt- cr having extended his original two-year lour three Umcs-Uie people of Gonbad Kavous mate him an honorary citizen, a medallion and .-troll presented by the mayor. Among the monuments to his memory he left behind w-erc a public library, kindergarten, two school buildings, and a modern science laboralory. His greatest personal satisfac- tion came from an Informal pro- gram that grew out of his con- cern for drop-ouU back In school. Many of the young men had quit school In the sixth grade to sup- port their families. "In the six years I was there, 1 got 41 back In he said, "and only one has dropped out again." He also got two scholarships lo schools in the. United Stales and others to Turkey for the stu- dents he taught. He rented a house for were 14 living with him when he left spent much of his money on needy students. "It was the working with the people HIM I will remember he said. "I >lt and feel that an Investment of limo in people is the best contribution a person can make and will the biggest dividends." Franco Cuts Basque Terms MADRID (AP) Gen. Fran- cisco Franco commuted Uw death sentences of six Basque extremists tonight. The 78-year-old chief of state reduced the sentences to 30 years in prison. The announcement that be was saving the youthful Basques from the garrote or the firing squad came alter Franco met with his Cabinet for the sec- ond straight day. Franco acted after receiving pleas for clemency from gov- ernments and heads of states in various parts of the world. And Iherc also was the threat renewed violence in Spain should the sentences be carried out. They were imposed for murder and banditry. In Burgns, Lt. Gen. Tomas Garcia Rebull signed the death sentences and sent the docu- ments, along with the harsh prison terms for nine other de- fendants, to Madrid. Three of the accused each received two death sentences. The 78-year-old leader of the Spanish people scheduled a na- tion-wide year-end television broadcast tonight. Franco taped the speech Tuesday. Appeals for clemency contin- ued to pour in. But In St. Jean de Luz, across the border in the French Basque country a Basque spokesman said one of the six condemned men had written a letter saying: "We hope strongly that clemency will not be accorded. We are re- volutionaries. We wish to die for the dignity of man and the liber- ty of our Basque lands." The spokesman, Teleforo de Monzon, said he believed all six of the condemned were "as se- rene and determined" as the writer of the letter and shared his sentiment. De Monzon would not say who the writer was. There were several demon- strations in Spain Tuesday In support of the Basques and ona in support of Franco and the army, but in general the coun- try was calm. In Guipuzcoa province arrjnri San Sebastian, the Basque capi- tal, workers stayed awty from their jobs and off tha streets. Six thousand others in adjoining Vizcaya province fol- lowed suit. In Oviedo, 30 demonstrators staged a sit-in at a church, while in Barcelona police bmke up a caravan of 70 horn-honking motorists and arrested several persons. Another demonstration took place in Tarrasa, near Barcelo- na, but It was so small and mild that police did not intervene. In Zamora, an estimated persons demonstrated in sup- port of Franco and the army. Area Rain H-SU Receives in Gifts Settles Dust A low pressure trough aloft set off showers in the Big Country Tuesday night and early Wednesday and area residents were able to take a deep breath without tasting dust for a change. Ballinger recorded .55 and Blackwcll and Cisco each had .50, Rainfall reports cf about a third of an inch were common with: Colorado City, .36: Baird, .35; Sweelwater, .35; Eastland .32; and Anson, Hawley, Putnam, Moran, Rotan, Stamford and Tuscola all had .30. At Abilsne Municipal Airport .21 was registered, the first measurable rain since Nov. 13 when .08 was recorded. However, reports were that ole sol was beaming about the area by mid-morning and puddles were beginning to dry up. Within the dry summer, fall and early winter, it appears that Abilene will end the year well below normal on rainfall. With less than two days remaining in 1970, only 17.92 inches of moisture has been recorded this year, well below the normal of 23.32 through this date. And no more rain is being forecast through Thursday. WHERE IT .2J 17.92 23.32 .22 .30 .35 .55 .50 .23 .50 .20 .10 .36 .32 .25 .20 .30 .15 .20 .30 .10 .30 Tr. .30 .20 .25 .30 .35 Tr. Year end gits totaling approximately have been given t o Hardin-Simmons University, Dr. Clyde Childers, vice president for development, disclosed Wednesday. Two anonymous gifts, one amounting to and the other from a major U.S. Corporation are among the December gifts, Childers said. During the month of De- cember, the official said, was contributed through the Presidents' Club. TUT PRESIDENTS' Club, which honors the 13 men who have served as president of II a r d i n -Simmons University, was organized to aid the present chie.' executive. Dr. Elwin L. Skilcs, and those who follow him. To date some has been contributed to H-SU through the Presidents' Club. Membership Is available lo persons who contribute at least or more. Other recent gifts include: -A total of from Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Streich of V. Falls to complete pay- ment on the refurbishing of new tennis courts adjacent to Rose Field House. contribution from the Carnation Company Founda- tion of Los Angeles, Calif., pre- sented by Otto Pfetffer, manager of the firm In Wichita Falls. -A GIFT from Uie Andersen Foundation of Bay Port, Minn. This is the second year in a row for this foundation lo Include H-SU among Its recipients. The foundation pro- vides funds to private institu- tions over the nation which do not accept out-right federal funds for building purposes. addition retired Ar- kansas Supreme Court Judge Ed F. McFaddin of Little Rock, has added to a special endowed scholarship. The scholarship provides for an annual award to be given to a graduating senior who has minored in Greek with the highest grade point average. gift from an out of stale firm. NEWS INDEX Amusements 6A Bridge SB Classified............ 4-7B Comics 1IA Editorial! IDA Horoscope 4A Hospital Patients 5A Obituaries 2.3A Sports 7-9A To Your Good Health____4A TV Log 9A Women's News........2.38 ABILENE Municipal Airport Total for Year Normal for Year ALBANY ANSON BAinn BALLINGER DLACKWELL DRECKENRIDGE CISCO CLYDE COI.E.MAN COLORADO CITY EASTLAND HAML'N HASKEI.L HAWLEY KNOX CITY MERKEL MORAN PAINT ROCK PUTNAM RANGER ROTAN RULE SNYDER STAMFORD EWEETWATER TUSrOLA WINTERS Goodfellow Funds Still Trickle In WEATHER U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE linlit (WIIIMr MIP Pf. U) ABILFNE AND VICINITY Mdiui) wrdntidar ftMrrnorwt ind Thurtdir. Ihnugrt coldtr tonight. and Thwrrtaf In mt low low wrdntidir nteM 13. wind! 1S-M m D n. dccrtiling ttfdrKiciy nohT. Only {62.50 arrived in Wed- nesday morning's mail for the Goodfellows who still lack meeting their goal of to pay the bills incurred assisting hundreds of Abilene families have a Merry Christmas. Along with the contributions came a letter of thanks from a mother of "I want In thank you and MarkelMixed At 4ih Hour End Industrials were off 1.16, transportation was up 2.43, and utilities were up 1.45, at the end of fourth hour trading Wednes- day on the New York Stock Ex- change. The New York Com- posite was up .10. Volume was shares, reported the nflicc of Schneider, Rprnet J'nd Hickman, Inc. everybody Pa the Goodjellow list for making this Christmas a Merry Christmas for my eight she wrote. "They were very happy with what they got. "Tliank you and God oless each and every' one of you. I will always remember you and yours in my prayers." The total received to date by the Goodfellows is The Goodfellows still need to reach the goal and each and every contribution, large or small. Is most welcome. Latest contributors: In memory of Rev. H. D. Cumby by, Rev. J. L. Johnson, Brownwood, Texas 2.50 Mr. Mrs. George W. Leonard, Jr. 10.00 The Barber Foundation 50.M Previously Acknowledged Total lo Dale .......15.7M.ft4 Goal ..............K5W.N TEMPEIJLTUIES TMt. p.m. 11 U H il 11 !7 I! in 1.00 5.00 t 00 in v IT 11-M >t rwi: II utt. REPORTER-NEWS SUBSCRIPTION RATES DELIVERED BY LOCAL CARRIER AND DEALER TO RESIDENCES AND BUSINESSES: Morning Sunday OR Evening Sunday..... Morning Evening Sunday 5025 iJ o month a month   

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