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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: December 28, 1970 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - December 28, 1970, Abilene, Texas                               Ifcttew "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT 90TH YEAR, NO. 19H PHONE 6734271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, MONDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 28, 1970-THItiTY-FOUR TWO SECTIONS lOc DAILY-25c SUNDAY Auoeiaicd Pww (IP) Fiery Rep. Dies SCIENTIST OUTLASTS HECKLERS AT SEMINAR H-bomb's Dr. Edward Teller was interrupted during program (AP Wlrtfhatar Scientific Strength Fading, Teller Says By ELLIE HUCKER Curbside Parking Space Is Public Q. Who has (he right to determine who parks in front of my home? Me, lie property owner, or the City? A. It's public right of way, ihus the City has the right to decide who parks ihere. According to City Ordinance, public right of way can't be reserved for private use, so anyone can park in front of your house as long as they're nol blocking your driveway. Any parking restrictions that would be placed in front of your home (such as time limit) would be placed there only by the City. Q. I want to enter a contest and nerd to know what pro golfer has the most accredited holes In one? A. Art Wall Jr. holds the record. He's credited with 33 holes-in-one between 1936 and 1966. Dr. Joseph 0. Boydstone scored three- holes-in-one in one day (at the third, fourth and ninth holes) at Bakersfield Public Coll Course In California en Oct. 10, 1961, says the Guinness Book of World Records. (I. I've seen several recipes that call for "hearts of palm." What on earth are Hey? A. They're part of the central leaf bud or head of the palm tree. The hearts are stripped of the tough outer coverings and canned, either raw or lightly blanched, in waler. They're imported from Brazil or packed in Florida. Hearts of palm are sometimes referred to as "palm cabbage" or "gru-gru" and are described as tasting bland and delicate. Palm hearts are usually found for sale in the gourmet section of food stores and are often used in salads. Another interesting little tidbit unearthed by the City Library is that the palm tree dies when the hearts are taken from It. Q. Is Ihere a "Parents Without Partners" club In Abilene? II so, send me Information on it please. A. Okay, it's an international, non-profit, non-sectarian educational organization. The primary Interests of the local club are the welfare of their children and helping each other with the common problems of single parenthood. The organization tries to be of help to people who are divorced, widowed or separated and who are experiencing a difficult period In their lives. The group holds adult parties as well as family type outings for the children. Parents Without Partners is listed in the phone directory. Q. I've accumulated some mercury In the past several months. Could >ou advise me who would be Interested In this and what It's worth? A. We've sent you the name of a gas company that's Interested In purchasing your mercury on the condition that It's not "hot" (you know, Seems there's a lot of mercury thcivcry going on. The gas company will pay J8 a pound for ncw mercury, If It's pure. Used mercury sells for about 14 a pound. The gas company uses It In gas measurement to gauge natural gas flow. Addrws to Action Unc. Rox M. AWItne, TMM 796M. Namn will not be nwd hat questions mast be signed and MUtttsn Rlvrn. Pirate Include I icphone numbers II possible. CHICAGO (AP) Dr. Ed- ward Teller, often called the "father of the says a deterioration of the nation's scientific strength Is under way, and that scientists themselves are largely to blame. He cited as one reason the zeal of some of their number for crash-type, big-expenditure re- search programs known as "big science." He also declared that "per- haps we have meddled too much in other people's specifically being too close-mouthed with the public regarding scientific pursuits. Teller, of the University of California's Lawrence Radiation Laboratory at birthplace of America's hydro- gen his views Sunday in addressing the 136th meeting of the American Asso- ciation for the Advancement of Science. Teller declared that too much of the nation's nuclear and other scientific research is kept se- cret. He said scientific knowl- edge should be shared "so we can clearly understand what we NEWS INDEX Amusements MB Bridge................7A Classified........... 8-1 IB Comics SB Editorials 4B Horoscope 6B Hospital Patients ......13A Obituaries............. 3A Spcns To Your Good Health____6A TV Log............... 73 Women's News........2.3B are talking about" in the cur- rent national debate over the impact of science and technolo- gy on modern society. In his address Sunday, Teller said "big science" has produced great advances in applied tech- nological fields such as the space effort and advancements in computers, but asked: "What has happened In the last quarter century? Why have money and talent, lavishly ex- panded, not produced, more un- He said one possibility "Is that 'big science1, though apt to produce great advances in ap- plied fields, is less productive of basic understanding." Teller's address was Inter- rupted briefly by a group, most- ly students, calling themselves the People's Science Collective, which has demonstrated at ?ev- eral other science meetings. Group members hoisted pla- cards and said they were op- posed to the use of science for war and other destructive pur- poses. Teller replied, "I have a right to speak and until the placards are put down, I will not. I was In the terrible witch caldron cf Nazi Germany. I am Jewish. As now, 1 then was under attack by ppcm'e who don't know why they talk." The demonstrators attempted to present Teller with a "Dr. Strangelove Award." Teller, plainly distressed, re- fused the "award" and refused to continue speaking until Dr. Margaret Mead, internationally known anthropologist and chair- man of the session, restored or- der. BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) Rep. L. Mendel Rivers, the fiery, powerful head of the House Armed Services Commit- tee, died early today at Univer- sity Hospital here, hospital offi- cials said. He was S3. The South Carolina Democrat had open heart surgery Dec. 11 to replace a leaking mitral valve with a plastic valve. Sun- day, he suffered a series of heart stoppages, but heart ac- tion was restored, though the hospital said Rivers remained seriously ill Rivers' heart had stopped at least once previously, on Dec. 20, but a doctor revived him. In a statement Sunday, the hospital said: "The persistent tendency toward this type of ir- regularity Indicates continua- tion of the long-standing prco- perative head failure." At a.m. CST today, Riv- ers died of what a spokesman said was continuing heart fail- ure. He was attended by two physi- cians and several nurses at the time of his death. There were no family members at the bedside, but some relatives staying at a nearby motel were notified, the spokesman added. Rivers entered the hospital Dec. 8 for extensive tests, the hospital said, when it was dis- covered he suffered from severe leakage of the mitral valve. An aide to Rivers said the vet- eran Democrat had suffered from heart trouble for some time, and it may date back to rheumatic fever In his child- hood. He said the congressman had limited his activities in recent months because of the illness. The South Carolina Democrat was recently elected to his 16th term. He first came tn Washing- ton in 1941. Before that he was in the South Carolina House from 1933-1936 and for a while was a special attorney for the U.S. Justice Department, Rivers, in his capacity as L. MENDEL RIVERS dead at 63 chairman of the House Armed Services Committee, ranked as one of Congress' most powerful voices for U.S. military superi- ority. He once likened himself to Ju- lius Caesar in terms of military power. First in line for Rivers' chair- manship is Rep. Philip J. Phil- bin, D-Mass., but he was defeat- ed in the November elections so would be chairman only for the few1 remaining days o[ the 91st Congress. Thus, under Congress' seniori- ty system, Rep. F. Edward He- bert, D-La., who will be the committee's top Democrat in the will succeed Rivers as chairman. Hcbert (pronounced A-bcar) headed the special My Lai sub- committee which last summer (1970) that field mili- tary and State Department o'li- cers in Vietnam deliberately tried to cover up the alleged massacre. Rivers betrayed no he was about to undergo heart sur- gery when he won Ilousy ap- proval Dec. 7 of a resolution commending the Army com- mando raid on a North Vietnam POW camp. His spce.-Ji was filled with the pungent phrases crowd of savages in Ha- booming oratory that characterized his style cf debate on the floor. Earlier that day he had been presented an admiral's field cap with "The Bij Boss" and six gold stars emblazoned across it by the first planeload of 153 Vietnam GIs who got round-trip flights home that Rivers had helped arrange. With flowing white hair, the style of a Southern gentleman and an erect 6-foot-3 frame, he was the Hollywood idea of a congressman and he liked to lace his debate with quotations from poetry and the Bible. His five-year chairmanship of the committee was marked by tough language "Retaliate! Retaliate! he boomed after Hanoi's Tet offen- sive on South de- termination to maintain mili- See RIVERS, Pg. 11A Special Election to Replace Rivers Possible for Spring By At, LAMER Associated Press Writer COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) Gov. Robert McNair will call a special election, probably in early spring, to fill the congres- sional seat from South Caro- lina's 1st District which became vacant with the death of Rep. L. Mendel Rivers, D-S.C. McNair's office said Monday the outgoing chief executive will set the special election date in- stead of leaving it up to incom- ing Gov. John West, who takes office Jan. 19, because of ths need to fill the vacancy as soon as possible. McNair himself is considered a likely candidate for the Demo- cratic nomination to the 1st Dis- trict seat. McNair, like Rivers, was born in Berkeley County. McNair also has a bona fide claim on 1st District residency because his home was in Allen- dale before he switched residen- cy to Columbia after becoming governor. Rivers' influence as chairman of the powerful House Armed Services Committee has helped bring a military payroll of more than million annually to the district. His death early Monday in the University of Alabama Hospital at Birmingham touched off sor- row and apprehension among South Carolina Republicans and Democrats. Rivers had been re-elected in November to a 16th two-year term with the endorse- ment of both parties. Man Grateful for Goodfellow WEATHER Still Short U.S. DEPARTMENT Of COMMEtCE National Waattitr Itrrlca (Wtatkrr Mill. Pg. IJ-A) ABILENE AND VICINITY (a) milt rid'Ull Partly cloudy and mild today. partly cloudy and a lirtlf cooler tonight and Tuesday. High today near 70. tonight UDoer Ilh, high Tutsday mid 60s. Winds light southerly. lEMPEIATURCi Sun. p.m Men. a.m. a a (J 11 U tl a oo so a SO U U ti 57 a a MB 51 M 53 a M M Hflh and low for 14 hours ending f a.m 70 15. High and low lor tama data last Tear: U and U. Sumet lail night: p.m today: Sunset tonight: Barometer reading at noon: 71.11. Humttiry at noon: per cent. LARGE-SCALE FRAUD SUSPECTED IRS Orders Crackdown On Medical Deductions By RAY DE CRANE (Newspaper Enterprise Assn.) WASHINGTON (NEA) A nationwide crackdown on medi- cal deductions claimed on income tax returns has been ordered by the Washington office of Internal Revenue Service. Suspecting that large-scale fraud might be attempted on this year's tax returns, IRS will demand more proof than ever on claimed medical expenses. CANCELED checks and re- ceipted statements from doctors will no longer be accepted as bonafide proof of payment by taxpayers. HIS auditors plan to go one step further on the 1970 returns and Inquire "How much ol this fee was paid by an Insurance company or by a union health and welfare Income lax rules hive always been clear on this point: Only those expenses actually paid by the taxpayer over and above reimbursement If mm an The. Reporter- A'nr.t Kay Dr. C.rnne't anil hnnli, "Cut Vour Oim starling Sunday, Jan. 3. Insurance company or other source may be claimed. INADVERTENTLY helping the tax cheaters are unions and Insurance companies who give the member the option of having payment go directly to him or to the doctor. The person Intent on cheating on his taxes elects to have the payment go directly to him. He then deposits the Insurance pay. mont In his checking account and Immediately Issues his own personal check In the Identical amount for his doctor. When his canceled check Is returned by the bank he retains It as "proof" of his medical pay- ment. If he wants to make his case Ironclad, he presents both the statement from his doctor and his canceled chock to his Income tax counselor M support of his medical deduction. THE MEDICAL assistant to a doctor alerted one district direc- tor of Internal Revenue to the situation when she recounted her experience of this month. "Since Dec. 1, I have been asked to prepare at least 500 statements for patients who have asked .the total of their payments to my doctor- employer this year. Tnty have told me they want the statement for use In preparing their Income lax returns. "I happen to know that In almost every case they have been 100 per cent reimbursed by their union for their medical she reported. "Not one cent of their own money is Involved." ASKED HOW large the claimed expenses might run, the medical assistant replied: "My employer Is a surgeon. His fee for an operation might be as high as That's the kind of a deduction that might be unfairly claimed." Now that they are alerted. IRS Auditors arc prepared to loner the boom. Only was received by the Goodfellows Mondsy morning and is needed to reach the goal of Total received to date Is and the Goodfcllows need to reach their goal in order to pay the bills incurred from Israel Set To Allemp! Talks Again JERUSALEM (AP) Israel has decided to return to the Middle East peace talks at the United Nations with Egypt and Jordan, Prime Minister Golda Meir announced today. Mrs. Meir reported the decision to newsmen alter a special meeting of the Israeli Cabinet. Israel suspended its participa- tion in the talks on Sept. 6 be- cause, it contended, there had been an Egyptian missile build- up in the Suez Canal area in vio- lation of the Middle East cease- fire. The decision to go back to the. peace table had become virtual- ly certain when the Cabinet was given the assent of the ruling Labor party and its chief coali- tion ally. The way was paved when Mrs. Mcir's Labor Party and the National Religious party gave the go-ahead. In an effort to offset the mili- tary advantage credited to the Egyptians with their forward movement of missiles, the Is- raelis conditioned their return to the talks on receiving assur- ances of political and military support from the United States. Authoritative sources quoted the prime minister Sunday night as baying the conditions for re- turning had been created. These conditions were under- stood to be a commitment by the Americans of continued arms supplies and a firmer use of their deterrent power to coun- ter Increasing Soviet Involve- ment In the Middle East. aiding Abilcne's less fortunate In having a Merry Christmas. A 78-year-old man has written a nolc of thinks to the Good- fellows "who gave his Christmas a spark" by sending food scrip. Several Christmas cards with just the word ''thanks" have been received from various All Indicators Up At 4lh Hour End Industrials were up 1.51, trans- portation was up 1.69. and utili- ties were up .48, at the end of fourth hour irading Monday on the (New York Stock Exchange. The New York Composite was up .20. Volume was snares, reported the Abilene of- fice of Schneider, Bernet and Hickman, Inc. families who were recipients of toys, food and clothing. Those receiving help from the Goodfellows Included 783 fami- lies who received food, 728 who received clothing and 502 who received toys. Each year Goodfellows con- duct a drive to raise funds to assist Abilene's needy in having a Merry Christmas. Contributions may be mailed to the Goodfellows, Abilene Reporter-News, P. 0. Box 30, Abilene, Texas 79604. Latest contributors: Anonymous 5.00 In lieu of Christmas Cards to friends in Abilene-Dama Hambclton 10.00 Previously Acknowledged ......15.6U5I Total loDalc .......15.6I8.il Kidnaping Suspects Arrested in MONTREAL (AP) prime suspects in the kidnap- murder of Pierre Laporte were captured in a farmhouse outside Montreal today. Police said they offered no resistance. A spokesman for the Quebec Provincial Police said a light in the window of what was be- lieved to have been an empty farmhouse led police to Prul Rose, 27; his brother Jacques, 23, and Francis Simard, 23. He reported a fourth man was also taken into custody but hj was nol identified. The house was In the vinnty of St. Due, 20 miles southeast of Montreal, and near L'Acartii where police carried out exten- sive searches over the Christ- mas holidays. They found nothing In L'Acadic but their suspicions were aroused and they kept the farmhouse near St. Due under observation. They raided the place May when they saw the light InMda at about, 5 a.m., wl on no had cntyH the build ng. Inside the house police found a 20 foot tunnel beneath the cement floor. It was stocked with food and other supplies. A police spokesman said the men could have remained :n the underground hidcway undetect- ed for weeks. A police spokesman said tha entrance to the underground hideaway, behind the furnace in the basement, was little more than 14 inches square. The Rose brothers and Si- mard eluded police In Montreal last month by hiding in a falsa closet by a house. Laporte was seized In October and found dead a week later. iMul Itojc, 27. had been sought In connection with the kidnaplngs of both Laportc and James R. Cross, the British tr.idc minister who was re- leased by the abductors Dec, 4 after two months In captlrliy. Jacijiics U. ami Slmaid, alsu 2.1, I'jH-d In a warrant on Oct. 21 charging them cnnvpiracy In Lanprlc's ab- duction, y.   

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