Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: December 18, 1970 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - December 18, 1970, Abilene, Texas                               tlje gbflew "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT 90TH YEAR, NO. 188 PHONE 673-4271 yf ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, FRIDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 18, PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS lOc DAILY-25c SUNDAY Anoeiated (ff) By ELLIE RL'CKKR Opium Poppies Differ From Garden Poppies Q. There's a rumor going around In our community that It's against the law to grow popples in the yard. Is Ihls true and II so why, as you can bny poppy seed at Ibe spice counter? Many recipes call for poppy seeds. Some older gardeners are ending down tbe popples as they come up for fear of tbe law. A. It's against the law to grow opium poppies (Papaver but chances are your poppies aren't ol that species because it's also illegal to sell opium poppy seeds. Although it's possible to grow them here, opium poppies are native to the Orient and the country of Greece. Poppy seeds seen in spice racks and those used by bakeries are not from the opium poppy, says a spokesman for George J. Ball Seed Co. in Illinois. Q. When gas stations give away tree things like glasses that have Dallas Con boy stickers on them, do they have lo get permission from the Cottboys before they can give these things away? A. Yes. The name Dallas Cowboys Is a protected trademark. Any product using the Cowboys name must be cleared by National Football League properties and the right to use the Cowboys' name must be pur- chased. The fee varies with the type of product and the amount to be sold. The majority of the proceeds goes into Ihe player Benefit Plan, says Al Ward, assistant general manager for the Cowboys. Q. Please tell me who won the popular vsle In onr last Presidential election? I know President Nixon won the electoral college tote, hut what about Ihe popular vote? A. Nixon had more votes than Humphrey, but he didn't get a majority of the total popular vote; actual voles were cast. Of these Ninon received almost 32 million, Humphrey had close lo 31 million and Wallace had million; the balance was split between many minor parties such as Labor, Prohibition, etc. In order to have the majority of the popular vote, Nixon needed votes. This was true also of the Kennedy-Nixon race in 1960. Kennedy had more voles than Nixon, but didn't have a majority of the votes cast. Q. I've got a problem with fever blisters. Could you please tell me a fast and efficient way of getting rid of them? A. Action Line isn't really qualified to practice or prescribe medicine. But all the old wives have tales about the, cure for fever so Action Line being an old wife, feels qualified to pass along (he tale that Campho-Phenique is Ihe quickest and most elficient way lo treat fever blisters. You can purchase it at any drug- store. q. Mould jon please IfII me uhy "lice Haw" was taken olf Channel 12. We all enjoyed II very much. It was full of laughs and that's what we need nowadays, instead of some of this trash we see on TV. A. When KTXS switched from CBS to ABC programming, some of the CBS shows were pre-empted and Hee Haw was one of them. The station felt that since it already carried a country-western type show (Johnny Cash) Jt could afford to leave Hee Haw out of the programming. Address questions to Action Line, Boi 30, Abilene, Texas Names will not be nsed but questions must be signed and addresses glicn. Please Include telephone numbers If possible. Really, It's Hot a Christmas Snow Job In Miami, Fla., two college students.in warm weather attire buzz along a highway near the Miami U. campus with a Christmas tree on the back of their motorcycle. The students, both from cities in the north, are Carol Wallach of Cleveland and Mark Nestler of Yonkers, N.Y. At right, a record snowfall of more than a foot fell in Salt Lake City Wednesday and on record there for 24 hours. The storm caused dozens of minor wrecks and one fatal accident and socked in Salt Lake City International Airport for six hours. More snow was forecast. (AP Wirephoto) No Shipments Germ Stockpile to Go WASHINGTON (AP) _ The Pentagon announced today plans to destroy all germ war- fare stockpiles under conditions of "absolute safety and securi- ty." The offensive g i o 1 o g i c a 1 agents and toxin stockpiles, manufactured originally for use against humans and crops, will be destroyed at their current lo- cations in Pine Bluff, Ark., the Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Den- ver, Colo., Ft. Detrick, Md., and Beale Air Force Base, Calif. Officials stressed there will be no movement of any of the agents. This would appear to as- sure against a flare-up of the kind of running dispute which occurred when the Army set out to get rid of more than tons of obsolete nerve and mus- AHS Officials Press Search for Vandals Abilene High School officials were still seeking vandals Friday who did some worth of damage to the school's auditorium and its contents sometime Wednesday night. Principal Escoe Webb said Friday that the school "is still working on the case" and that Ihe investigation "at Ihe present time is among sudents from our own school." He said lhat "local Investi- gation officials will be working with us on the case." HOWEVER, Capt. George Sutton, head of Abilene Police Criminal Investigation Division, said Friday morning that as far as he knows the incident has not been reported to the police. "All I've heard about it is what I've read in the he said. "If something Is destroyed, we usually are called in." Webb Indicated that police were not notl.'ied immediately alter Ihe vandalism was discovered (shortly after a.m. Thursday) because the incident "looked like a senior prank and we like to work on that type of thing ourselves." "But the proper authorities will be Webb said. In the auditorium, wet tissue paper covered Ihe walls and floor. Decorations for the Christmas program were destroyed and Webb said that "some things have been misplaced and haven't been found." WALLS. SEATS and carpeting in the auditorium were wet and stained with water that apparently had been used to wet tissue paper. Fluid, "probably soda Webb said, had been poured on chairs and band instruments that had been left in the room in preparation for the morning program. A large sign proclaiming "Seniors 71" was left on the stage. Rather than calling off the Christmas program, however, Webb allowed parents and students to see the damage. WEBB WOULD not say Friday what action might be taken against the vandals if they See AHS, Pg. 2A lard gas by dumping it in the Atlantic. The destruction of the gem warfare stockpiles, ordered by President Nixon 13 months ago, is due to begin early next year and be completed In about a year's time. Army officials said that no op- eration will start until all feder- al, slate and local environmen- tal agencies have completed re- view of the plans to make sure they will not cause dangerous pollutions. The officials refused to say how much material will be de- stroyed or the specific nature of Uie agenls, or to discuss what hardware will be destroyed along with it. U. Col. Gerald G. Watson of Kilgore, Tex., the project officer in charge of the destruction pro- gram, told a briefing: "We think Uie identity of the agents and the amount in the stockpile should remain security information." He said the disposal operation will cost "The factors of absolute safe- ty and security were more Im- portant to us than cost and Watson said. Asked why it took so long lo complete plans for the disposal, Watson said the need to assure complete safely and to submit Markets Mixed At 4th Hour End Industrials were up .07, transportation was down .OS, and utilities were up .54, near the end of fourth hour trading Fri- day on the New York Slock Exchange. The New York Com- posite was up .07. Volume was shares, reported the Abilene office of Schneider, Be.-net and Hickman, Inc. the plans lo other federal, stale and local agencies accounted for the lag involved. Under Nixon's directive Is- sued Nov. 25, 1969, the United States renounced the ice of le- thal biological igents and weap- ons "and all other methods of biological warfare." The President pledged lhat Ihe United States would confine its biological research "to de- fensive measures such as Im- munization ind safety meas- ures." At the same time he directed See PENTAGON, Pg. 2A Santa Fe Beer Drinker To Drink Alone Sunday SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) Ed Braun of Santa Fe will be the only person in New Mexico legally drinking in a bar this Sunday. Braun, 57, advertising salesman for the Santa Fe New Mexican, has struggled through the red tape of stale liquor laws for one beer. At 2 p.m. Sunday, Braun will step up lo the bar at Santa Fe's La Fonda especially for him that day. He will then be served the beer he paid for on Nov. 25, by a bartender who will do no other work that day besides opening the beer. The incident stems from an interpretation of a 1969 law that a person can be served in a bar on Sunday but only if he pays for the booze in advance. It also requires (he bar to make application lo the liquor Division for permission to be open to serve the customer. So, Braun went through the red tape, the La Fonda Holel went through the red tape and Braun thus will be the only person in New Mexico legally quaffing in a bar this Sunday. Over Still Is Needed To Put Goodfellows Over Top For 20-Year Period ickhardt Friend Says She Was Army Spy HOUSTON (AP) Rep. Bob Eckhardt, D-Tcx., says a long- time friend and former constitu- ent told him she gathered in- formation about civilians for military intelligence agents over a 20-year period. Eckhardl told the Houston Post by telephone from Wash- ington the woman made the dis- closure to him Thursday. He de- clined lo Identify her, explain- ing she did not want her name made public. However, he said she would testify at any Inves- tigation. The Pentagon has been Ihe target of healed allegations that military Intelligence operations, usually confined to matters ol national security, have been widely directed at civilians, In- cluding some lop politicians. The Houston congressman said the woman told him the was first contacted In 1918. She said a man Identifying himself as a representative of Army and Navy intelligence and the FBI asked her to do a service for the nation. She said she agreed and was directed to get a job as a re- porter at the weekly Waco Citi- zen although she had no pre- vious experience. Eckhardt said her job was to call back and report at Connal- ly Air Force Base. She said she never knew the significance of Information she passed on or what became of It, adding lhat her alignments seemed minor and once she re- ported on a reading given to intelligence officers after she went through a simple prcs- scribed routine. She laid (he called her con- tact and Mid, "We're bavin; a drink tonight Think you can make "Oh, I'm pretly lied up." Ihe military igent replied. "But I think I can make it He gave a specific time and she met him at the prearranged place. She said. Eckhardt said the woman told him she gathered Information for about 18 months. Her ex- perience made her decide she was gathering the Information only for Ihe military Intelligence NEWS INDEX Amuiementi.......... IDA ISA Cloitifitd.......... I2-I7B Comici US Editorioli 103 SA Hoioital Patient! SB Obiluarlei 3A Spo.li II-I3A To Your Good Htalth____'A TV Loo...............38 Women'! services and not the FBI, she told him. After the 18 months she said she did not hear from agents again until 1968. She said this time a caller Identified himself as a military Intelligence officer and asked her to attend a meet- ing where a speaker was In dis- cuss the Communist movement in the United Slates. She told Eckhardt the meet- ing was conducted by conserva- tives. She said she was given a tele- phone number and delivered the Information In much Ihe same manner as 20 years earli- er. She said a few months later she found the number was no longer In service. Eckhardt said Ihe woman Is politically conservative. "She did It out of he said. "Anyone loving his country would have probably done Uie same thing." Over is still needed to put the Goodfellows over the top in their fund drive for to help Abllene's less fortunate in having a Merry Christmas. Friday morning's mall brought to bring the overall total received to date to By the time the Goodfellow toy store had closed Thursday over 500 persons had shopped for toys. SCRIP FOR FOOD and clothing is also being given for those who have asked for help in order to have a Merry Christmas. Contributions should be sent to Goodfellows, The Abilene Reporter-News, P. 0. Boi 30, Abilene, Texas 79604. LATEST CONTRIBUTORS: Mr. and Mrs. Forrest W. Harlow 10.00 Mr. and Mrs. Booker 'Lewis 10.00 Elmcrest Baptist Church 40.00 KRBC-TV and radio cmploves 25.25 Texas Highway Department District Laboratory 20.00 Anonymous 10.00 Key Cily Chrysler- Plymouth Employes 50.00 Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Wahlenmaicr Thanking (hose who always give to Seventh Day Adventist Disaster Relief Fund 25.00 WEATHER U.I. OP COMMERCE Nllloul WMttnr Iwrln iwaamar uat U M) ABILENE AND VICINITY (M milt naiui) ConiidrraMt ctoudinni lodir and lonigM and warm A cnanca tor blowing dint mli arttrnoon. Incrnung ctoudinni coottr on lahjrdiy. High lain 71. tenant U. Mgn Sarurvay winn uuffitrly 70 U m.p.h. changing to itiit anrrrocn ncrltittly H IB ta fl m.p.h. tonight. Wind warnlngi art in tma fer ail lakn. TIMPEIATUItlt Tiirtfay FrMaf am. 20.00 500 25.00 5.00 15.W) 15.00 5.00 a 77 74 71 71 11 11 17 II 17 U It U U 11 II la II II U 17 High ana IDT II hour) tndlng I m 71 am U. HigH tow fir dall tail Yiiri II and 11. twin Ittt dm, twrlu tally: am., ivrnd lunuM: 1 14 pin. ireirvtar it nmnt 1104 In. KumwiTy It neni 17 nr ttrl. Friends in and Mrs. T.G. Olipoant 5.00 Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Thomasson 10.00 Quincy M. Sumrall 10.00 B. Frank Rhodes 10.00 Mr. Mrs. John Gibson 15.00 Mr. Mrs. F. M, Robertson 25.00 Roy Burton lawn, Texas 10.00 In lieu of Christmas cards Mr. Mrs. Phil Allen In Memory of, Mr. Mrs. Frank Berryman 10.00 In Memory of, Mrs. W. S. Brown 10.00 Anonymous 5.00 Anonymous 25.00 MaJ. Francis G. McAulilfe 10.00 Anonymous 3.00 In lieu of Christmas cards to Abilene Friends Mr. Mrs. BUI Massey Mrs. R. S. Barnes Mrs. J. J. Bledsoe Anonymous Mr. 4 Mrs. Ike W. Jay E. L. Haag, Sr. Honor ol Granddaughter "Andrea" Mr. Mrs. Greeson In lieu of Christmas cards lo Abilene friends Cold Aims At Texas By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Wintry wealher headed toward Texas again today, promising a rude Interruption to the unsea- sonable warmth In some sec- tions. Official observers looked for light sr.nw or drizzle by Satur- day In parts of the Panhandle and a noticeable chilling over the northern portions of Ihe state. It was expected to slay mild In other areas. Strong south wind; kept on pushing wirm air ashore from the Gulf of Mexico. clouds covered the southeastern half of Tens, with fog stretching from the Houston area on the coast as tar Inland as Tyler and Long- view. There were high, thin clouds elsewhere. Mr. Mrs. Don Fomby 15.00 Mr. Mrs. Dean Hamilton 10.00 Lt. Mrs. Gregory P. Zem 10.00 Anonymous 1.00 In lieu of Christmas cards to friends in Abilene Mrs. Grace Barlow 5.00 Anonymous 2.00 Anonymous 20.00 CapL Mrs. Michael Sifferd 10.00 In memory of Mrs. Arthur Sears Artie Price 25.00 Cub Seoul Pack 25 Den 2 Dyess AFB 6.50 Dr. t Mrs. Zane Travis 25.00 Exchange Club of Abilene 200.00 Sgt. Mrs. Wm. A. Senna, Debbie Ken in lieu of Christmas cards to Abilene friends 10.00 Mr. 4 Mrs. Tommy L. Hallford 10.00 Capt. Henry A. Stevens, III 10.00 Mr. t Mrs. J. C. Roberts 50.00 Instant Sign Rentals 10.00 Mr. It Mrs. Robert L. James 5.00 LeU Fay King 15.00 Anonymous 100.00 Marshall Jackson -Ovalo 7.00 Brownie Scout Troop 171 2.00 Mr. Mrs. Larry D. Edwards Wingate, Tex. 10.00 Employees of Merchants General Office 50.00 Anonymous 25.00 Mrs. B. C. Robcrson 10.00 Gay i Richard Rogers 10.00 Mr. Si Mrs. A. C. Sides 25.00 Albert W. James 10.00 Fred 0. Wallace 5.00 In lieu of cards to my Abilene friends Jane Norris 5.00 In lieu of Christmas cards (n Abilene friends from the Milton Brown family 10.00 Mr. Mrs. Bob Bailey 20.00 Previously Acknowledged 10.7M.1I Total to Dale 11.9H.M Goal   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication