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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: December 8, 1970 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - December 8, 1970, Abilene, Texas                               f fy "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT Byron 90TH YEAR, NO. 178 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE. TEXAS, 79604, TUESDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 8, 1970-TWENTY-FOUR PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS IQc DAILY-25c SUNDAY Auocioted Prett (ff) Immediate Trial Demanded U.S. Soldier Shoots Student: S. Viets Riot By MICHAEL PUTZEL QUI rlHON. Vietnam (AP) Anti-American rioting raged Monday and today In this cen- tral coastal city following the fatal shooting of a Vietnamese high school student by an Amer- ican soldier. A 24-hour curfew was ordered tut demonstrations, window- smashing and the burning of U.S. military vehicles contin- ued. Some American troops have been Injured by flying rocks, informants said. Qui Nhon was placed off lim- its to all Americans. Informed U.S. sources said the demonstrators, estimated at between and today, were demanding that the Amer- ican soldier who killed the youth be turned over to South Viet- namese authorities for Immedi- ate trial. The soldier was not identified. He was in custody, and military officials were investigating'the shooting. "We're not about to turn him over" to the South Vietnamese, said one U.S. official. The Unit- ed States has no status of forces agreement with the Vietnamese giving them jurisdiction over American military personnel under some circumstances as it has with South Korea, for exam- pie. Informed sources said the stu- dent was killed Monday after- noon when a group of Viet- namese youths climbed aboard an American Army truck car- rying boxes of C-rations and tried to steal some of them. One of the two soldiers riding in the truck fired a shot in warning, the sources said. The shot killed a high school student standing nearby who was not in- volved in the looting attempt. The dead student was from a Buddhist high school which has a politically conscious student body made up largely of An Quang Buddhists, the militant antigovcrnment faction, the sources said. Several students paraded the dead boy's body through the streets, chanting "Yankee Go Home" and attracting followers as they marched. Then school children began hurling rocks at U.S. soldiers, smashing the win- dows of American Jeeps and burning vehicles. The demonstrations subsided Monday night but resumed this morning as students from other high schools In Qui Nhon, South Vietnam's fourth largest city, joined in. Some adult opponents of the South Vietnamese government also joined the demonstration. Police tried to disperse the dem- onstrators with riot gas, and some students were Injured by police clubs. The national police In the city were reinforced by militia and Vietnamese military police, but by this evening no regular army forces had been brought in. American officers met with the province chief and leaders of at least three student groups. The Americans assured them that the family of the dead youth would be compensated, but they made no promises con- cerning the soldier who shot him. No charges have been filed against the soldier, sources said. Several thousand Americans are stationed in and around Qui Nhon, which is 275 miles north- east of Saigon. There are no American combat units in the immediate vicinity. Endorsement Expected Council to Study Ford Agreement And Not a Cab in Sight Commuters' cars and trucks jam Second Avenue in New York City, Monday, as the taxicab strike went into its third day. The strike by members of the New York City taxicab drivers' union, apparently added only slightly to the strain on transit authority subway trains and buses that ordinarily are packed at rush hour. (AP Wirephoto) Husband-Less Mother of Asks for Goodfellow Aid "I would like clothes and toys for my an Abilene mother appeals to the Good- fellows. She YTrites that she hopes the Goodfellows can help make Christmas merrier for her seven children. She says she is not working because she has been sick and she has no hus- band. This Is typical of the many letters received requesting aid Irom the Goodfellows. TUESDAY MORNING'S mall brought In making a total of received towards the goal of Requests and contributions may be sent to Goodfellows, The Abilene Reporter-News, P. 0. Box 30, Abilene, Texas 79601. "I am asking you to help me for the first another Abi- lene mother writes. "Will you please give me some food and clothes for Christmas? Without your help my little boy and I won't have any Christmas. I am not able to work any more." "I WOULD LIKE to ask for help for me and my four requests another mother. "I am only asking you for food and clothing please. 1 am sick and can't work, so if you can, please help." A mother of three asks for food and clothes. "My husband Is sick, so I just can't afford any toys. I barely have food, so if you can only manage to give me food and clothes, I will be more than happy." LATEST CONTRIBUTORS: Mr. 4 Mrs. W. 0. Cope In memory of Ben Rlchcy Anonymous E. L. Abshlcr Mr. Mrs. Frank Williamson Officers' Club of Dycss Air Force Base Anonymous 10.00 Thursday Forum 23.00 Plasters Cement Masons Local No. 591 25.00 Anonymous 5.00 In Memory of Ben T. Christian 5.00 Mr. It Mrs. II. A. Pender 10.00 Mr. Mrs. R. H. Hii 10.00 Mrs. Ernest Harber 10.00 Mrs. Lois Tice 10.00 Mrs. L. M. Touchstone 10.00 Eula Sears 5.00 In memory of Dona Mae Hurley 5.00 Anonymous 5.00 50-50 Class First United Methodist Church 25.00 Mr. Mrs. John B. Clark 10.00 Mrs. E. J. Grisham Arthur Excel Bible Class St. Paul Methodist Church 50.00 Anonymous II.CO Mary Martha Sunday School Class Aldersgate Church Jack E. Martin Mrs. Eugene C. Pearce Mrs. Fay S. Owens Beula Wynne Love Mr. and Mrs. W. T. Walton Anonymous 25.00 5.00 10.00 10.00 5.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 2.00 Previously acknowledged Total to dale Live Nativity Seen for Zoo Christmas is probably one of the slowest times of the year for most zoo animals. This year, however, at least a few Iambs and baby deer are going to be occupied at the Abilene Zoo. Zoo Director Dan Watson explained Tuesday that a live Nativity scene will be at the zoo through Christmas. It will be sort of a turnabout from most manger scenes, which have live people and fake animals. At the zoo, the human characters arc statues and the animals are all alive. Watson said the scene will be presented on weekends and through the Christmas holidays but not on weekdays. The director also said he would like to tee some groups utilize the zoo for example, "for some at sunset." Scattered throughout the zoo are other See LIVE, Pg. 2A DETROIT (AP) Bargainers for the United Auto Workers have recommended to the un- ion's Ford Council a tentative contract agreement with the Ford Motor Co. The 200-member council was called to a session today to de- cide whether the pact should be submitted to the No. 2 automak- er's members for a ratification vote. The agreement was reached Monday afternoon following a 28-hour bargaining session. The council was expected to endorse the proposed contract, which then must be approved by majorities of skilled and un- skilled workers voting separate- ly in 99 Ford-UAW bargaining units. Details of the agreement were withheld pending the council meeting but it was understood that it followed closely the pact reached last month by the UAW and General Motors Corp. after a 67-day strike. The new GM contract immediately raised average hourly wages from to and by its third year is expected to raise wages to over The GM pact also provides for unlimited cost-of-living wage in- creases, retirement after 30 years service with a month- ly pension at age 58 and other Improved benefits. A major issue stalling Ford negotiations In their later hours sources said, was the retroaetiv- ily of wage increases. The old contract expired Sept 14. It was reported that Ford had agreed to make 26 cents of the average first-year wage In- crease under the new one retro- active to Sept. 15 and the other Markets Mixed At 4lh Hour End Industrials were down 2.05, transportation was up .12 and utilities were down .51, at the end of fourth hour trading Tues- day on the New York Stock Ex- change. The New York Com- posite was down .10. Volume was shares, reported the Abilene office of Schneider, Bcrnct and Hickman, Inc. 25 cents retroactive to Nov. 1. The total retroactive pay un- der the 26-25 cent split would av- erage per worker and it was reported this money would be made available before Christmas. Making 25 cents of the pay raise retroactive to Nov. 1 would cost Ford million, compared with million had the entire raise been made ret- roactive to Sept. 15. The UAW, which did not get its demand for a company-paid dental care program at GM, got its foot in the door on the Issue at Ford. The firm agreed to de- duct insurance premiums to pay for dental care from the work- ers paychecks and to pay the In- surer, should the worker decide to join the program. The company-paid hospital- medical-surgical insurance pro- grams now in effect at the Big Three started out in the same manner, as worker-paid, volun- tary programs. If the Ford settlement closely followed the GM agreement, it would cost the company roughly billion over three years. G.M officials estimated the cost of their settl ement, covering more than twice as many as billion. The President's Council of Economic Advisers has called the GM settlement inflationary. When asked Monday if the Ford settlement was Inflationary, Malcolm Denise, Ford vice president, said: "Well, we thought that part of the pattern had been established some time ago." County Eyes TV As Jail Security By ROY A. JONES II Reporter-News Staff Wrllcr Taylor County Commissioners Tuesday purchased two new cars lor the sheriffs department and discussed the possible pur- chase of dosed circuit television sets for the "new" Jail. Commissioners accepted the low bid of Arrow Ford Co. for the two new automobiles, which will replace a 1965 Ford and 1967 Chevrolet. ARROW'S LOW BID, less the trade-ins, was Other bidders were Jack Chevrolet with and Max Murrell SHOPPING DAY9 TIL CHRISTMAS Bus Rider Claims 'Plot' by Merchants 50.00 10.00 5.W 1M.OO By ELLJE RUCKKR Q. Why have the downtown merchants plotted against city bus riders, causing us to walk even farther to and from bos stops? Bus riders shop downtown too. Yesterday we were let off the bus just after we got under the Pine SI. nndrrpass by that parking lot and told Ihc bos wouldn't be stopping anymore on N. 2nd where the bus "shed" Is! Then we saw cars parked where the bos had been letting us off and picking us op. I, for one, Mill quit taking my trade downtown and I fctl sore other bos rid- ers will also. They pick us up on every corner, why not let ns off at our near- est comer? A. The stop at N. 2nd and Cypress was removed for several reasons. The main reason was the merchant1! needed Ihc space for customer parking and according to .1 survey l.ikcn by the City Traffic Dept. there weren't enough people riding the bus In warrant the stop there. Secondly, the bus "shed" was becoming a nuisance; It was filled with trnsh and debris. The City had quite a few complaints about It, Also, tho new bus terminal Is only two blocks from the old "shed." Bud Taylor, head of the City Bus Service said there are three authorized bus stops (N. 4tb Walnut, N. 2nd Cedar, Showcase but the bus drivers will pick up or dispatch riders at any corner where (he driver can conveniently pull over without holding up traffic behind him. Q. Could you please give me a recipe for cooking a venison roast? A. Here's one that's tried and true (and easy, Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Place large square of heavy aluminum (oil l.i roasting pan. Rub 4 Ib. venison roast with fait and pepper. Brown the roast In a fryinS pan, then place it In center of the foil. Sprinkle one envelope onion soup mix over meat, lop with oz. can condensed cream of mushroom soup and cup water. Seal meat In foil, folding up sides lo form a pack- age. Roast for 3 hours or until tender. If, after trying this recipe you don't like the results, then rc.id the next question. Q. I understand ll.e Roys Ranch ol Ahllrnc would like lo have fresh venison. Is this true and U what Is the procc- dare? A. It's true. If you have a freezer full of venison and you can't convince your family to cat it, take it to the Boys Ranch on McGec Drive between South Trcadaway Blvd. and Abilene State School. The cook says the boys love it and it helps her out loo, in varying the menu. If possible, call before delivering the venison (692-2500) and try to have it there before 5 p.m. so it can be transported to the frozen food locker used by Boys Ranch. Q. The Clyde High School band Is polnq to play at halfllme at the Sun Howl game In F.I Paso. We're wondering If this will be carried on any o( the local TV stations? A. KTXS will carry It on Dec. 19 from neon until the conclusion of the game. Q. When was I-te J. Cobb born? Where was he born and who are his parents? I had an uncle named Robert I.TC Cohli who Sfltlrd In New Orleans Mho had (HO tons and I-co J. could h? the child of one of those sons. A. He was Iwm In New York City on Dec. 9, 1911 and that's a fur plcco from New Orleans, Ills pircnta are Benjamin Jacob and Kate (Neilecht) Cobb. Q. All the girls In the office where I work have been wondering If you could Id! us what "white chocolate" really Is. None of us can find any Information about II, but arc guessing that It's sweetened cocoa butter. Could that be right? A. "White Chocolate'1 Is a mixture of sugar, vegetable fat, milk solids and flavoring. The vegetable fat used may or may not be cocoa butter, which is the natural fat found in chocolate. But no matter what type of vegetable fat Is used, according to FDA regulations, the resulting product cannot be called chocolate. A spokesman for Ilcrshcy Foods wrote us that Ihc term "white chocolate" Is a misnomer and may not legally be used on products produced within the U.S. The FDA has established a standard of Identity for products which use the word chocolate on Ihcir Isbel and so-called "white chocolate" doesn't comply with this regulation. Address questions lo Action IJnc. Box 30, Ahlltnc, Texas "JMI. Mill not be used but questions must be signed and addresses Riven. Please Include telephone U possible. Chevrolet Co. of, Merkcl with Commissioners made n o decision on the closed circuit cameras and sets, but Indicated an interest in the system, as did Sheriff George Maxwell. Maxwell had earlier asked commissioners for extra jail help when in jail renovation is completed, reason- ing that one jailer will no longer be able to adequately keep up with all the prisoners In the sprawling complex. A closed-circuit TV system would certainly help alleviate this problem, he said. RAY MURRAY, manager of the commercial sales division of Scars, Roebuck and Co., demon- strated a small camera and 14- square-inch screen for com- missioners at the meeting. A survey of the jail has shown that 22 cameras could "adequately" cover the areas See COUNTY, Pg. 2A WEATHER U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Weather Stnrict IWeatner Map Pg. A) ABILENE AND VICINITY ffl mill Partly clouJy In tni mornina; Tttvlay WMnaday, lair and warm in tnt afiemoont. Hqn today 71, low loniaM U. hiss en Wednnday rear M. Wines lOutntrly 10 to IS witi evjti 10 25 mo h. TEMPERATURES Hon. p.m. TutL am. M }M J4 41 U tl il ti i.n 51 6? 3.00 !4 J? 17 57 37 37 31 14 M 35 a 55 45 35 U High and low lor 74 hourl ending am: U and U. Hfcn and tow I3r lama data lait yrari 13 and JO. Sunitl Hit nlcnt: 3D p.m.. Sunrlit twar: a.m.. unul lonignl: p m. Blrorr.eler reading at noon: 71.14. Humidity al noon: 4] per cent. NEWS INDEX Amuumcnti........... BA Bridfle Busincu Newj.........10A Buiirxu Outlook........ 7B Clowilitd...........9-128 Comlci S3 Editoiioli..............6B Horcucpe I2A Hospital Potienti........9A Obiluatici 4A To Your Good Health 12A IV Leg MB. WonWi   

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