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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: November 30, 1970 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - November 30, 1970, Abilene, Texas                               "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT flOTH YEAR, NO. 170 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE. MONDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 30, 1970-TWENTY-EIGHT PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS IQc 'DAl.LY-.28c Auocioted Pnu Cff) 'KLINE Working Man's Dream, Union God 4-Day Week Arrives for Colorado Firm By BLUE RUCKER Fishing Places Are Hard to Find Q. I'd like lo know all I can about fisherman's rights on these rivers: Clear Fork ol (be Brazos, north and .south of these rivers, and any rivers In this particular area. Also on such roads marked private leading to these lakes or rivers. Hasn't a fisherman got a right to fish even though people own land on both sides of the water line? It seems lo be getting so hard to find a place to fish where there aren't any "No Fishing" signs. A. In that general area, the landowners own the property down to the water line, but if you can reach the river through public land, why fish away! Or if you slay on the river (in boats or bridge) you can fish all you like, but you can't trespass on privately owned property to get down to the river. Thai's discouraging, we know, so here's a suggestion from Game Warden Robert Wood: If you'll ask Ihe property owners for permission to fish, most all of them will lei you use their property to get to the river, they just like to know who's wandering around on their land. Q. I'm a seventh grade student at Madison Jr. High. I'm Interested In being an ocsanographer and 1 don't know what courses I should take In Junior High. Could you please tell me where I could obtain some Information? A. You'll be receiving an information sheet from the head of the Oceanography Dept. al Texas giving you prerequisites for studying Oceanography and other helpful information. You might be interested in knowing that Oceanography Is a graduale course so It doesn't mailer what courses you take in Junior and Senior High. Also there are four types of oceanography: chemical, biological, physical and geological so you'll have to decide which field you want to enter before anyone can advise you on college courses. Q. Conld you tell me why we haven't gotten new street markers on Westmoreland and on the northslde? When Ihe wind blows the marker on our corner turns completely around. A. Hang on, the Traffic Department just hasn'l gotlen to you yet. They've replaced signs on the heavily traveled major streets first and are just siarting to work the resi- dential areas. They're In southwest Abliene right now and haven't decided what section to work on next, but It mighl be the north- west. Anyway, lhey'11 be Ihere eventually. Q. On Ihe opening day of one of the stores here I purchased a Hem. Using a personalized bank check on an In-town bank, I produced my driver's license for Identification. The clerk asked for more Identification so I showed my Nurses License, Social Security Card and Health Insurance card. I have no credit cards as I don't believe In buying on credit. The clerk Insisted on credit cards to prove my Identity. I don't believe Ihe store has posted any Identification criteria and It would certainly help In the future to know exactly what Is acceptable. Perhaps the store could post a notice to save embarrassment lo the customer. A. There's now a notice posted on every check-out counter and the store manager said he wishes lo apologize to you personally for any Inconvicnience or embarrassment caused by the incident. There was a sign on Ihe service desk stating that two pieces of identification (preferably driver's license or credit card) are necessary to cash a check. The checker was apparently just trying to abide by the rules. The manager said if you don't have a credit card, the store will accept an armed service ID card or a utility bill as proper Identification. Q. A friend's pet boa constrictor recently died, and I would like very much to present a similar snake to my friend as a Christmas present Where may I purchase a boa, anaconda, python or similar constrictor snake? Also, bow much would a young boa constrictor cost? (From a reader In Lubbock.) A. A baby boa wilt cost you about says Zoo Director Dan Watson. He also says that boa constrictors don't make very good pels and for heaven's sakes whatever you do don't get a Cook's tree boa because that is one mean boa! lie suggests a Children's python If you must have a snake for a pet Check your Lubbock Pet Shops for a boa or write Ray Folsom, llcrmosa Reptile, 219 Pacific Coast Highway, Hermosa Beach, Calif., 90251. Address qutsllom lo Action Line. Box 20. Ahllrnc, Texas Namrs Mill not hr used but questions must be signed and addrcstw glvrn. Please Include telephone numbers U possible. By J. HUNTER. HOLLOWAY Associated Press Writer LITTLETON, Colo. (AP) Paul Patterson's Jeep is parked outside, ready for Ihree days of in i the high' Rockies overlooking this fash, lonable Denver suburb. Lori Coffelt is looking forward to three days with her children. Executive George Gregory has a golf date Friday, and plans to finish paneling his basement playroom the rest of the week- end. "Rest o.1 the Right. Come 4 p.m. every Thursday, Paul, Lori, George and 450 other employes of C. A. Norgren Co., walk out of their modern plant, drive through the .landscaped grounds and begin a three-day weekend. Norgren's employes put In 37 hours a week at work.' But it's spread over four work days, not five. A United Stcelworkers union survey shows Norgren is one of at least 27 ing a total of some people no'.v have a four day work week in one form or anoth- er. The four-day week, a dream of most every working man and goal ol many unions, is just one of many innovations adopt- ed by Norgrcn, a manufacturer of air processing systems which t'riJes itself as a long-time lead- er in industrial relations. Profit sharing came 25 years ago. Pleasant working condi- tions and music piped through the airy lunchroom are other in- novations. So's the landscaping around the sprawling two-story brick and stone building. The manicured lawns spreading sev- eral hundred yards across the front ol the plant and around its large, landscaped pond attract- ed a pair of Canada geese fix years ago. Now more than two dozen cavort on the grass. The S15-million a-year family (wned, company instituted Ihe four-day week on Aug. 31. It meant going from a traditional 40-hour week to 37 hours, and amounted lo an hourly salary increase of IVt per cent. The company says applica- tions for employment jumped 300 per cent the week after the announcement, and have held at that level since. "It's kind of early to tell juit what economic effect it's having on said George Gregory, head of Norgren's advertising and marketing. "We get the general feeling we will be able Census Puts Count At 204 Million WASHINGTON (AP) The Census Bureau, releasing final figures on the 1570 census, said today the total population of the United States as of April 1 was The figure includes U.S. serv- icemen stationed abroad and DR. R. LEE RODE succeeds Harvey Baker Rode Named Head of Fair Dr. R. Lee Rode, Abilene physician, was elected president of the West Texas Fair Assn. for 1971 Monday morning at a director's meeting at the Taylor County Coliseum. Other officers named were Jack Stricklin, first vice president; Joe Hodges, second vice president; Charles Langford, third vice president; John Wisll, treasurer; Joe Cooley, secretary and manager; and Harvey Baker, immediate past president. THE 1571 FAIR is scheduled for Sept. 13-18. Nib Shaw served as chairman ol the nominating committee. Commenting on his term as Baker said, "It- has been' a tremendous and rewarding experience. This is one of the greatest fairs in Texas." He expressed appreciation to all those who "worked so hard to make the Fair a success." "THERE IS NO way lo ex- press our appreciation of Joe Cooley and Mrs. Mildred he said. "Each year the Fair gels bigger and better and I don't think the 1971 Fair will be any exception." itrs. Smith has served the Fair Assn. for many years as office secretary. New officers will assume duties Jan. 1. WEATHER S. DEPAITMtNT OF COMMEtCC NltloMI WXItitr Stnrlci iniinur uip PI. it-l) ABILENE AND VICINITY (40 milt Ptrttr Uouffr wirm toSJr. lonignt tra TMUIIT. todir m high TJ-I low lonicni In tugn Jo i. H4'i Tundjy iboui M. WWi wutntriy 10 u Une.h. State by Stale, Pg. 3A federal employes overseas. Ten years ago, in 1960, the fig- ure was As -a result of the new census, California will gain five seats in the House of Representatives. Representation in the House is based on population. The bureau said the five-scat gain by California will move it into the lead among the states and in House representation, with 43 members. New York will lose two seals as a result of the census, drop- ping it to second place with 39 representatives. Also gaining scats are Flori- da, three; and Arizona, Colora- do, and Texas, one each. Pennsylvania will lose two seats and Alabama, Iowa, North Dakota, Ohio. Tennessee, West Virginia and'Wisconsin will lose one each. The new apportionment of House seats will be effective with the 93rd Congress which convenes in January 1973. The Census Bureau said Cali- fornia gained 4.2 million in pop- ulation in the last decade, the largest of any state. Florida gained 1.8 million, Texas 1.6 million and New York 1.4 mil- lion. The bureau said the 1970 resi- dent population, excluding U.S. servicemen abroad, was In 1960, the resident total was The bureau said more than three-fourths of the national growth between 1960 and 19TO occurred in metrpolitan areas, with suburban rings showing the fastest gains. It said suburban- ites outnumber those living in the central cities for the first time. But the population in many central cities declined sharply. Three slates, West Virginia, North Dakota and South Dakota i lost during the dec- ade, the bureau said. All Indicators Up At 4fh Hour End Industrials were up 7.60, trans- portation was up 2.34, and utili- ties were up .45, at the end of fourth hour trading Monday on the New York Slock Exchange. The New York Composite was up .57. Volume was shares, reported the Abilene of- fice of Schneider, Bernet and Hickman, Inc. Getting the Full Toot Jim Jones, freshman at Hardin-Simmons University, demonstrates how the trombone is played to James Hill, center, and Darla Jones, right, students at Bonham Elementary School, during a break at the Abilene Philharmonic Children's Concert Monday morning at the Civic Center. (Staff Photo by Don Blakley) Park Commissioner Won't Purchase Mustang Island AUSTIN (AP) The chair- man of the Parks and Wildlife Commission said today the state has better things to do with its money than buy land on Mus- lang Island for a state beach park near Corpus Chrisli. Pcarce Johnson explained lo Ihe Texas Conservalion Founda- lion why he had refused to sign an application which could pro- vide up to million in federal money to purchase the land. He read a 24-page statement to the foundation, which was asked by Gov. Preston Smith to look into the possible pur- chase of the land. Glenn Biggs, foundation chairman, formerly of Abilene said the group would make a recommendation to the governor after it had collected "information and facls." Johnson said he felt that "I and my integrity are on trial here and I must, in all fairness to myself and the many people who agree with me, do all that I can to defend my position." Johnson said the professional planning slaff of the Pa-ks and Wildlife Department did not think the Mustang Island pro- posal meets Ihe priorities of the statewide outdoor recrealional plan, and thus the federal funds Pleas for Help afr Christmas Exceed Goodfellow Donations p-m. 1.00 MM t.m. ti 71 1.00 II 71 4M II 71............. U a too.............ii u v> II ......._.... U li U a .............u.oo............. M 17 It M 11.00 ............71 High >ntf tor 11 noun maing t m. High loo lor utrit ditt bit JAM JJ lunwt uil J J4 n.m. lotir: Voim jm p.m. iHMTtttrr rtidinq il nmni Jl.OO. Hvn._..f U Ptr ctnt. Monday morning's mall brought only more to the which will ,be iised: to make Christmas brighter for needy Abilene fami- lies. Added to the received Sunday, this brings the overall total received to date to Goal this year is 1-iltst contributors: Duncan F. Frame 5.00 .Anonymous 10.00 Anonymous 100.00 Mr. and Mrs. Ira Harrison 5.00 Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Hcnson 5.00 W. J. Clinton 5.00 Mr and Mrs. W. K. Miller KM Total Previously .Acknowledged Totaitodatc Letters from families seeking help for Christmas keep pouring In. Contributions and requests for help should be addressed to fioodfollows, Abilene Reporter- News, Dox 30, Abilene, Texas 79601. One mother asks for. some shoes and coats for the kids and some groceries. She writes that nor husband Is not here and she is unable'to work. ANOTHER ABILENE mother requests toys, food and clothes for her five school age children. "My husband works In construction and doesn't work when It's too cold. Also I had surgery two times and I still have to sec the doctor twice a week." "I want you all to please help me have a Merry an elderly woman writes. "I am a poor old lady, age 70. and unable to work. I would like for you all to give me some food and clothes." One mother wriies: "Would you please help me to have a Merry Christmas; I have two kids, ages twn and four. My husband went lo jail three years ago and I haven't heard from him since. I am asking you to heln my with food, clothes, and toys. God will bless you all." being sought cannot be used for the purchase. The final proposal of the three-member commission was lo buy as much land as avail- able of the acres of Mus- tang Island being offered by Mrs. Sam Wilson. But money limitations would restrict the purchase to about acres, testimony from Johnson and ex- ecutive director J. R. Singleton indicated. "All data and facts that can be brought togelher al Ihis time show thai the .Mustang Island area is not a priority area by any stretch of the Johnson said. He said, for example, there are 2.5 million people within 100 miles of Galvcston compared to ttilhin 100 miles of Cor- pus Chrisli. And he said lo claim that the Stewart Ranch pur- chase "innk care of the needs of the 2.5 million people in the Houston planning region Is like saying you saved a starving man by giving him a cup of rice." "Il Is quite Johnson said, "that there is a greater need for park land on the upper coast than In the Corpus Christ! area even after the acquisition of the Stewart Ranch properly... If additional coastal land to be purchased in this region it Is clear that the first land to be acquired should be purchased near Brownsville and not Cor- pus Christl." Johnson added that the pro- ject proposal for federal money had Singleton's signature1, but "appears lo be an obvious forge- See PARK, 3A to maintain or increase our pro- duciion." He said a detailed study of Ihe economic impact had not been completed. The great majority of the em- ployes like it, he said, although "there were a few grumbles about the long hours." The plant runs two shifts, the day shift from 7 a.m. lo 5 p.m. Monday through Wednesday, and 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Thurs- day. Thai's 37 hours, with a half hour for lunch. The night shift comes on at 5 p.m. and works through 3 a.m. except on Thurs- day when the shift ends at 2 a.m. With a degree of pride, Grego- ry said unions had altempted to establish themselves at Norgren twice in Ihe past. "They weren't he said. One immediate asset from the innovation, he said, was Ihe problem of shipping. Gregory said, "we arc ready to ship Thursday aft- ernoon, instead of Friday." The crales of valves, fillers and oln- er products which Norgren maJies lo protect air operated equipment, are picked up from the loading dock Thursday and reach the express agency in downtown Denver that evening. "That means they leave town early Gregory said, "and frequently are delivered to our customers by Monday." Before the four-day week, he said, shipments did not leave the cily unlii Monday. Most of Norgren's domestic customers are on Ihe East Coast or in Call- Comia, he said, "and that two days makes a difference." Suppliers, on the other hand, have found that Ihey must make deliveries Monday through Thursday. Paul Patterson, a set-up man en the assembly line and a machinist, spends a !ot cf his extra free time exploring rugged mountains and says his wife "really likes the long week- tnd. There's no chasing around on Saturday... We take care of rental appolntmenls on Friday, eV Ihe chores and slill have Sat- and Sunday." Patterson and others agreed generally, however, lhal Ihe third day cff was expensive. "It cast me Gregory said, noting he had purchased two suits on a recent Friday. "We have more lime to spend mon- Patterson explained. "Mrs. Coffelt, a 29-year-old mother of two children, said that while she's at her secretary's desk, a babysitler is at home with the youngsters, "but I don't have to pay a siller on Friday." Inslcad, she said, she ar.d Ihe children do something together. "Go shopping, most- she admitted. Gregory said he used to be re- to.lant to take a Friday after- noon off for golf. "But now I've got plenty of time." Much of the rret of Ihe weekend Is spent working wilh wood, Ihe execu- tive said. "I've built a book case in my daughter's room and I'm finishing the basement, put in a bar and now I'm paneling." Envoy, Wife Kill Selves LISBON (AP) West Ger- many's ambassador to Portu- gal, Dr. Hans Schmidt-Hprix, and his wife committed suicide during the night, the embassy announced today. A brief statement said the couple killed ihemselves for "private reasons." There were reports lhat Ihe ambassador shol himself after he found his wife had taken a fatal dose of sleeping pills. "I can only say for the mo- ment their desperate act had Mining at all to do with Dr. Schmidt-Horix's said an embassy official. One acquaintance said Ihe ambassador's 56-year-old wife was "a vivacious, cultured but somewhat ncuroUc woman." He and Us wife, Barbara, had two children. 1WS INDEX Bridge................'" Clowilied.......... 13-I6B Comici...............I" Cd.lctioti............. 'OB Hmpilfll Pdticntt....... I6H ObituariM 2A.4A To Your Good TV Loa...............90 Ntwl.........JB   

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