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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: November 27, 1970 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - November 27, 1970, Abilene, Texas                               IMene "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT BOTH YEAR, NO. 167 PHONE 673-4271 PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, FRIDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 27, 1970 lOc DAILY-25c SUNDAY Auoeiated Prtu 5, Kids... And Dear Abby I- "If I could give today's parents tf some advice it would be to let child know that he con come to you with ANYTHING without j being made to feel guilty or ashamed." With this Abigail .Van Buren devotes today's en- j; tire column on Page 5B to a care- .fully researched and worm-heart- ed discussion of a subject that is uppermost on the minds of so many parents and youngsters. Don't miss it! By ELUE RUCKER Who Gets Pecans On Rental Property? Q. Who Is entitled lo the pecans from a pecan Irre on rental landlord or (he renter? We dldn'l sign a lease, have rented the house since July and recently received a letter from oar landlord saying he's coming lo town lo gel Us pecans. A. Then you'd better let him have them because, In this case, they belong to him. You're renting the right lo live in his house and if you should discover gold in the backyard, it would belong to the landlord. Same Is true of the pecans, unless the lease agreement slates to the contrary, says the city attorney. This isn't a hard and fast rule now. If you had leased the land for some time, watered, pruned and cared for the tree then you could conceivably have an In- terest In the pecans. Q. 1 asked my history teacher this question and she didn't know the answer. Can you'find out why It Is that an revenue (money) bills mast be started In the House of Representatives and all other bills may be started In either house? A. It's required by both Texas and Federal Constitutions, and goes back lo the English Parliamentary practice In the Century when Ihe feeling was thai money tills should start In the House of Commons because It was more representative of ihe people than the House of Lords. This reasoning carried over to our government because the lower house of the legislature was elected In colonial limes, where the upper house was appointed. The Senate wasn't elected directly by the voters until Ihe early 1900's. and it was felt that In money matters the people should have more direct control. Q. What Is Ihe general address In Austin ol our stale senators and representatives? A. Sen. David Hatliff, Capitol Station, Austin 78711. Write Representatives Grant Jones and Frank Calhoun at Ihe same ad- dress, but add House of Representatives. Q. Why Is Ihe speed limit greater on N. First than on S. First since S. First Is our main outlet? A. The City Traffic Engineer has been anticipating your question, he said he knew someone was going to ask that The reason Is simply that the speed limit on both streets was set years ago before the business built up on North First. As a safety factor, the speed limit was lower on a street with many business establishments. The Traffic Dcpt. Is running a speed check on all the major thoroughfares right now, raising a few, lowering a few and this particular situation will be looked Into, for sure. Q. Would yoa please specify Ihe dividing line between Abilene High and Cooper High? How was this divider decided npon and Is there still an area where a student may have a choice? A. No. There used to be areas where students; had a choice lo avoid splitting the Bonham Elementary District, but when the school board adopted Its Integration plan the free choice areas were eliminated, as requested by the U.S. Dcpt. of Education. The dividing line, starting at Ihe west side of the city along the north edge of Dyess Air Force Base on S. 7th cast lo Elm Creek, then south along Ihe creek to S. 8th, east to Willis, south to S. 9th, east to the alley between Rose Park and Ross St. to S. 8th, east lo the alley between Pecan and Cherry, north lo the Railroad, cast lo Firm-to- Market Road 12M, north to E.N. 10th, then cast to the school district boundary. A count was taken of high school age students, and the line was set so that there would be an equal distribution of students on cither side, half on the half on ihe south. Address qorsllMiJ lo Action I .Inc. 31, Abilene, Texas INfrl. Names will not be used hoi questions matt be ilpifd and jddrcswj (Ivfn. Plrau Include Ukphone numbers U possible. Liberty Bell Complaint 100 Years Too Late Ignorant Colonials' Blamed for Crack By PETER SIUCCIM LONDON (AP) A group of Americans turned up at least 100 years too late today lo com- plain to the makers of Philadel- phia's famed Liberty Bell that it was cracked. Bearing placards proclaiming "we got a lemon Instead of a bell" and "honor the warran- the Americans demonstrat- ed outside the Whitechapel Bell Foundry, where this revered symbol of America's Independ- ence struggle was cast In 1753. They were given a polite brush-off and "ignorant colo- nials" were blamed for the crack. The foundry was established In 1570 and 'has been making bells of all sizes and tones for the past four centuries. The gri- my brick buildinp. askew with age and bright with burnished brass fillings stands in the area where Jack the Ripper butch- ered prostitutes in the late 18005. Puzzled London bobbles eyed the chanting demonstrators as they marched on the sidewalk outside the works. Foundry director Douglas Hughes then Invited the 35 dem- onstrators into the tiny shop, reeking of history and hot met- al. Their spokesman, Les Waas, stepped forward and declared: "Mr. Hughes, we have a com- plaint to make." "Oh, said Mr. H., look- ing over his spectacles. "We want to state that the bell you sold us in 1732 was of Inferior Waas said. "We feel that your people did not do good enough and we want you to fix it." "We never guarantee our bells for 200 Hughes re- plied. "The bell left here in good order but America was then po- pulated by ignorart colonials who did not know how to handle it." Waas claimed the foundry had been negligent. "Why didn't you scotch-tape the handling instructions lo the bell when you dispatched he asked. Hughes then pointed out that three great Ben in London, the Tsar Bell In Mas- Autumn Leaves Fun for Children Parents may look at the falling of. leaves as just another chore but to the children they can provide hours of fun and entertainment Four-year- old Stacy Nail tries to show her little sister how to play leaves, but seven- month-old Leslie seems lo want to taste them. The girls are the daughters of Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Nail of 840 Highland. (Staff Photo by Don Undaunted by Stabbing Try, Pope Continues Program IJy PATRICK O'KEEFE Associated Press Writer MANILA (AP) Pope Paul VI, undaunted by a Bolivian painter's attempt lo stab him, carried out his program In Ma- nila today as If nothing had hap- pened. Civic authorities said a mil- lion Filipinos thronged the streets to watch the Pope drive to Manila Cathedral, where he held a mass. Later, the Pope received for- eign diplomats at the nunciary where he Is staying, and had dinner with President Ferdi- nand E. Marcos. Police said the painter. In priest's robes, carried a foot- long knife hidden under a gold- en crucifix when he approached the Pope. The pontiff had just arrived In Manila. His face showed sur- prise u police and dignitaries 'Practice' Painting Brings Million LONDON (AP) A portrail Velasquez painted In 1H9 just for practice was sold at suction (oday lo a New York dealer for the all-lime record price of million. The Wildcnsteln art firm In New York made (he purchase after spirited bidding at Chris- that got so high the galleries and museums, anxious lo keep the treasure In Britain, were simply unable to match the pice. The previous highest price for any painting was million for Rembrandt's "Aristotle Con- templating the Bust of Homer" at Ihe Parkc-Bcrnel galleries of New York nine years ago. The Spanish master's work Is a painting of his mulatto assist- ant, Juan dc Pareja. Velasquez whipped the paint- Ing out while walling lo carry out a mmmlssion for the Pope. The Karl of Radnor put the painting up for tale to pay off drain duties Incurred when he inherited the Ullt In IKS. subdued the painter on the red carpet spread out at the airport for the papal visit. He quickly "seemed calm and a Church official said. Police Identified the attacker as Benjamin Mendoza y Amor, 38, a surrealistic painter from La Paz, Bolivia. He told them he wanted "to save humanity from the religious propaganda of the Pope" and had been plan- ning the assassination for years. Marcos had just greeted the Pope on this first major stop on his eight-nation tour of Asia and the Pacilic. Marcos was walking beside the Pope on the red carpet when the man darted from the crowd of about at the airport and hurried loward the pontiff. NEWS INDEX ...........8B BridQt CloiJilifd.......... I2-I6B Comici I IB Ediionalt 10B 'A Hoipiiol Ohiiuo'iM J.3A SOOMI IM4A To Your Good Heohh------2B IV U0.............. HA Womtn'l Priests Led Bomb Plot, Says Hoover By JOHN CIIADHICK Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP) An East Coast anarchist group led by two imprisoned Roman Cath- olic priests plotted to blow up underground power lines of the nation's capital and to kidnap as hostage a high federal official, FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover disclosed today. The purpose, Hoover told a Senate appropriations subcom- mittee, is to "disrupt federal government operations" and to use the kidnapping as a lever to demand an end to U.S. bombing operations In Southeast Asia and the release of all political prisoners. The principal leaders of the plot. Hoover said, "are Philip and Daniel Berrigan, Catholic priests who currently are Incar- cerated in the Federal Correc- tional Institution at Danbury, Conn., for their participation In destruction of Selective Service records in Baltimore, Md., in 1968. Hoover said a White House staff member's name had been mentioned as possible victim of the kidnap plot. Hoover cited the alleged plot of the anarchist group as an ex- ample of the increased willing- ness among extremists groups employ any type of terrorist tactics." He said the group Is known as the "East Coast Conspiracy lo Save Lives'' and has described itself as being composed of Catholic priests and teachers and former students "who have manifested opposi- tion to the war In Vietnam by acts of violence against govern- ment agencies and private cor- "FEATHER U.I. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National wtamtr Sanrici iwaittir Mao Pi. U-M ABILENE AND VICINITY It) milt radiuil Clear to partly clouov Frriay and Frrtay riant, and warm, turfing a KtTIa coo'tr on Saturday. HlgH Friday 77, Friday nntit a. on Saturday rear iS. wind wl bf mnncrty 10 ta II m.D-h. No rain li forecait. TEMPERATURE! Thort. p-rn. Fn. 70 M 77 II U l.M II J 00 arm 1.00 porations engaged in work relat- ing to VS. participation In Lhi Vietnam conflict." Hoover also said Increasing ties between Arab terrorists: and See PLOT, Pg. (A All Indicators Up At 4th Hour End Industrials were up 4.32, transportation was up .03, and utilities were up .33, at the end oi iuurth hour trading Friday on the New York Stock Ex- change. The New York Com- posite was up .21. Volume was shares, reported the Abilene office of Schneider, Bcrnel and Hlckman, Inc. cow and the Liberty Bell In all cracked, and nobody thought any the worse of them. "And I don't think there was any scotch-tape around In 1751" Hughes said that his father had offered to recast the bell in IMS after the Allied victory in World War IL "We were thanked for the of- fer but were told that the Liber- ty Bell was held In such rever- ence by the people of America that it would have to remain as It was." The Americans were shown around the foundry and given a glass of sherry. One of the priza exhibits was an old jib-crana that lowered the Liberty Bell on to a horse-drawn wagon which It took to the docks In 1752. In 1570, the foundry made tha bells which are still ringing In London's Westminster Abbey, the cathedral where monarchy have been crowed for almost a thousand years. The foundry still makes bells, ranging from silvery linkling in- struments used in old-fashioned shop doorways to enormous one-ton clangers for cathedrals. A 17-hundredweight bell costs about The demonstrators, who call themselves "The Procrasuna- were tickled ping by tha place. Helen Lehmann of West Lane, Bloomfield. Conn., said: "I think ll's absolutely marvel- ous." Mrs. Lehmann said The Pro- craslinalors believed In tha virtues of lateness. "This year we nominated Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis as' the comedy team of the she said. "We have Christmas parties In July and picnics In December. We nomi- nated George Washington for president In the last elections. Our motto Is 'Not Goodfellows Drive Off to Good Start 71 If t> II It S4 It 15 i5 f 08 w'.ao ,VCO .14 60 High ind tow for U houn mdlna 9 .im-: 12 SI H'tgn and lew far diTi Uil U ind 41. Synjet Hit night: imvlM todiy: i.m. Wwl .wight: p.m. Barvntttr rtiding it noon: Jt.14. HumWify at roon: U cent. An anonymous donor sent Friday to the annual Goodfellow Christmas drive which began Thanksgiving Day, bringing the tola! received lo The Goodfellows drive got off to a good start Thursday with traditional first givers handing in which was boosted later by a contribution from, the auto dealers. Goal Is and will be used to bring Christmas spirit in Ihe form of food, clothes, leys and dolls to the less privileged in Abilene. Latest Contributors: Anonymous Anonymous 10.00 Hardln-Simmons Volleyball Benefit 17.00 Abilene Independent Auto Dealers Assn. 100.00 Total 627.00 Previously acknowledged Total The Goodfellow drive really began earlier in the fall when school children In Abilene donated old dolls and toys to the drive and the city's firemen repaired and painted Ihem "good as new." Dolls were dressed In linery by Ihe VFW Auxiliary, Dyess Officers Wives and NCO Wives, and a hosl of volunteers. The rows of dolls also Included hundrds of new dolls purchased by the Goodfellows. "Headed by Syd Niblo, president of the First Slata Bank, the Goodfellows use money contributed to provide clothing and food scrip for needy families and to buy new toys and dolls to accompany those donated. Contribulions and requests for help should be addressed to Goodfellows, Abilene Reporter- News, Box 30, Abilene, Texas, 79604. To avoid duplication, Niblo suggested that only heads of families write appeals for help or if a neighbor knows of a family lhal needs help but is unable to write, the neighbor may address an appeal. After the work of certifying those eligible to receive help from the Goodfellows Is done by various civic organizations, Parent-Teachers Assn. members and VFW Auxiliary and Red Cross volunteers will man the Goodfellow Store from Dec. 15- 18 when the parents will allowed to shop for clothes, toys and other items designed to enliven Christmas at their homes. Everyone Turned Out For The Foxhunt, Except Fox PEALACK, N.J. (AP) The Jersey gentry turned oul for Ihe traditional Thanksgiving Day foxhunt, but ihe fox did nol. "I don't think there's a fox left In the muttered the master of the Essex Fox Hounds, William "Buster" Chadwcll. This English spon has gener- ated enthusiasm for nearly a century In this area of sprawl- ing estates 40 miles west ol New York City. "The ihrill of ihe chase, that's what people hunt sayj 1-arry llcllnn, the stable maMcr. "Flying across country for sev- eral maybe. Well, Ihcrc'l Just nothing like It" Organized In the Orange Mountains of Essex County in 1872 the Essex Kox Hounds of- fers subscribers its own land on which lo hunt. It also ha: kennels, stables, a club house, an Ice rink and icnnls courts. Some of the participants In previous hunts were minerals millionaire Charles Engelhard, magazine publisher Malcolm Forbes, former Secretary of the Treasury C. Douglas Dillon, art colleclor Charles Mellon III, and Jacqueline Kennedy Ona.i- sis and her children Caroline and John Jr. Mrs. Onassls wasn't there Thursday, but 100 otheri were. Fortified with winn punch served In stirrup cups, they set out across ihe estate of Ihe Lor- lllard family, following the 60 yelping hounds. Jumping fences, galloping along roads, crossing from So- merset lo Hunterdon Counly, the horsemen pressed a relent- less pursuit. Dozens of onlookers took an easier route. Traveling In can along narrow ildt roads they pressed their pursuit of tha honemcn. When ihe hunt ended no foxes had been seen. The dogs were put away and T. Murray Mo Donnell, an Investment allst went home with t broken coUirbooe, wtftrcd ta i   

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