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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: October 23, 1970 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - October 23, 1970, Abilene, Texas                               ;---F "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT ii i ijiiiii !ii M i i h IIM i I M 11 il' i i'ii Ilii i! "i, i i1 u i I i I 11 'in mli. :i i I It I) I 1 M ii i mm i GOTH YEAR. NO. 132 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, FRIDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 23, PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS lOc DAlLY-25c SUNDAY Auoeiated Prea Of) Reds Holding U.S. Generals Milady's Hat A big straw1 hat protects this little Cambodian girl from the sun near the village of Banam, about 40 miles east- southeast of Phnom Penh. (AP Wirepholo) SANTA CRUZ, Calif. (AD A young aulo mechanic accused of slaying five persons in a hill- lop manson was arrested today about a half mile from the scene of the slaying, sheriff's deputies said. A spokesman said John Linley Frazier, 21, who was charged with five counts of murder Thursday, was seized in a mountain cabin. Officers said they had staked nut the cabin, where Frazier had lived since two days before Monday's shooting deaths. The 6-by-6 foot-shanty is on the same hilltop as the mansion. separated by a half a mile and a deep canyon. Dist. Atty. Peter Chang Jr. said a friend of Frazier told au- thorities that the young man once remarked that people who lived like the victims "were ma- terialistic and "should be snuffed.1' Chang said three long-haired persons who live in a wooded area came to investigators at 3 a.m. Thursday after reading a note left at ihe .Maying scene and released to news media by the sheriff Wednesday. Chang said Ihe three told in- vestigators the threatened death for those who "misuse the natural environ- ment" and referred to larot cards to them as though it might have been written by Frazier. The hippie community was re- vulsed by Ihe massacre, Chang said. Hitchhikers Sought Oh to Questioning MIDLAND, Tex. (AP) Stale police said they were hunting two long-haired and bearded hitchhikers today for questioning about five murders at Santa Cruz, Calif. Stale Patrolman Ralph Ward said the search stemmed from Ihe facts that Ihe two "hippie types" displayed nervousness o'vcr broadcast descriptions of a man charged in the slayings of Dr. Victor M. Ohla and four others in California. Officers also are interested, he said, because one of the pair was reported to bear fresh burns, apparently serious, on both his arms. The Ohta man- sion and a car laken from the victims were lefi burninc. Ward related these details: The pair being sought for questioning came from the west Stout Elbow Bender 'Drunk as Charged' and Ihumbed rides at El Paso with an castbound motorist, stating they were bound for San Anlonio. Their agitation over the radio descriptions, however, caused them lo alight from the car at a highway interseclion near Pecos, 105 miles west of here. Ward stopped the car near Midland because its driver dis- played uneasiness after passing him. He said Ihe driver, not immediately identified, told of stealing the car somewhere in Indiana. Two other hitchhikers still in the vehicle told questioners about the bushy-haired pair, de- scribed as so heavily bearded their age was indelerminale. "We don't know who these hippie types Ward said. "We're just trying to find them and talk lo them. Whether they have any connection with the California case is strictly specu- lation." Tippling Middles Under Restriction ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) The man brigade of Midshipmen at Ihe U.S. Naval Academy has had its coming weekend liberty cut in half because a handful of freshmen plebcs couldn't handle their beer. Unofficial reports from high academy sources say Ihe weekend restriction, which will last until after dinner Saturday, Oct. 24, was imposed because some plebes were observed in Iheir cups following post game parties in Washington and Annapolis after Ihe Navy-Air Force football game last Saturday. The academy's official position, however, was contained in this statement issued Thursday by Capt. Robert P. Coogan, commandant of midshipmen: "For disciplinary reasons, I have Imposed certain reductions in midshipmen privileges for the coming weekend. "Thi is an internal matter related solely to the discipline and training of the brigade and I do not wish to comment on it publicly." The restriction of the entire brigade is reportedly an academy first, although officials insist that they don't really know "because we don't keep records.'1 Making of a Radical t'nr Anppla Darin, the journey tn llif FBI's Mnit Wanted List IIP- pnn in Rirminphnm, Aln. En route she left liehind it brilliant nrn- ilfmir rrrnrd nnd the. ndmirnlinn nml prni.it> of srhnlnn. IT'lint turn- inpt did ihp lake that led In a jnil cell? Sre Pp. 2.4 nt liro hiph Ifnrn ahnut the construe- lion Irnde hy ilninp. Fp. By MICIIAKI. JOHNSON Associated Press Writer MOSCOW (AP) The U.S. Embassy pressed the Soviet government today to let it inter- view two U.S. generals whose plane strayed across the Soviet- Turkish border in bad weather Wednesday and landed 12 miles inside Soviet Armenia. Maj. Gen. Edward C. D. Scherrer, commander of the joint U.S. military mission to Turkey, and Brig. Gen. Claude M. McQuarrie Jr., head of the mission's Army section, were being held incommunicado somewhere inside the Soviet Un- ion. A U.S. Embassy official said it was "quite unlikely" that they would be released snon. Also in custody were the pilot, U.S. Army Maj. James P. Rus- sell, 42, o'f Piney Woods, Miss., and a Turkish escort officer identified as Col. Dcncli. The Soviet Foreign Ministry said all four were in good health and that Ihe incident was being investigated. It did not say whether the men were consid- ered under arrest or merely in custody pending the investiga- tion, but it said the case was being treated as a penetration into Soviet territory by a U.S. military plane. Tass, the Soviet news agency, said the plane had "violated So- viet air space." U.S. Embassy officials re- quested permission to meet with Ihe captives in accordance with the U.S.-Soviet consular agree- ment, which gives U.S. officials Ihe right of access to American citizens held in the Soviet Union wilhin three days ot their dctcn- lion. The plane landed at Ihe Arme- nian town of Leninakan, and the embassy's consular officer, Pe- ter B. Swiers, said he was ready to fly there or lo any other des- ignated place. Flying a six-passenger Semi- nole U8 plane, Maj. Russell ap- parently lost his way in bad weather over the mountains of eastern Turkey and crossed the heavily fortified Turkish-Soviet border. The two generals were inspecting Turkish military units equipped with American weapons, and Iheir destination was Kars, 40 miles from the So- viet frontier. Officers in Ankara said they assumed all four men were in uniform since they were making an inspection tour and w-ere to have been met by Turkish mili- tary officers at Kars._________ Market Lower NEW YORK (API The stock market, which drifted downward all day Thursday, opened slightly lower tnday. It was the first lime in years an American plane had strayed across the Turkish- Soviet border. American offi- cials would not comment on speculation that Ihe Soviets might try to exchange the cap- lured officers for Ihe Lithuanian father and son who hijacked a Soviet airliner last Thursday and diverted it to Turkey. The two killed a stewardess and wounded two other crew mem- bers, but so far Ihe Turkish gov- ernment has not acceded lo Ihe Soviet government's demand that Ihev be returned. The last American flier to stray into the Soviet Union was held a week, in July 1963, before cansular officials arranged his release. He was Lt. Col. George Patterson of Chamblee, da., who was flying a small plane with a West German companion in an air rally from Romania to Turkey. They crossed Ihe bor- der near Batumi, Georgia, on July 4, 1969, and were released on July 11. Winds Wretk 7 Trailers at Breck Winds that some called a tor- nado slrucfc Brcckcnridge in West Central Texas today, pick- ins up seven unoccupied trailer homes and smashing them to the ground. The Weather Eervicc was un- able to confirm that the phe- nomenon was a twister. The storm struck about a.m. as thunderstorms covered a vast area around Bracken- ridge and much of Texas under- went rains and high winds. The trailer homes were new and were at the Vintage Home Plant in Breckcnridgc. One wit- ness said the homes were twist- ed and demolished like "little playthings." Lightning, thunder, wind and hail ushered a Pacific cool front into the Big Country' early Friday morning, spilling up to 1.42 inches of rain in one area and knocking electricity out in another. Rising Star recorded the most WEATHER U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Wtirher Scrvkl (Wtjlhcr Mjp. Pq. t-.A) ABILENE AND VICINITY rad'Uil Dftrniina cooler becoming fair Sflturdar- Hiqh Friday In Ire ucper 75s, Friday. n.Q'-f near 50 fl-xj h-ch SVur. tH mid m. Windl Irom ntst 1523 m p h. TEMPERATURES Thursday p.m. ....Fndiy rm. 11 79 75 fl I'M 1 CO t no 5. no 7.00 1.00 9 00 ivto 11 00 17.00 VI tl Hjrr 1y at 9 a r WHERE IT RAINED ABILENE ............Friday Municipal Airport .......29 Total for Year Normal for Year 20.40 ALBANY ................55 AXSOX ..................15 BALLIXCER ............15 CISCO .....................40 CLYDE................75 COLKMAX ..............Ofi COLORADO CITY ........52 KASTLAXD .............B5 I1AMI.IN ................26 HASKELL KNOXCITY .............04 LAWN.................... .57 MEItKKL.............. .2i PUTNAM................SO RAXGER ...............OS RISING STAR 1.42 ISOBY...................51 ROTAX ....................20 SNYDKR.............. Tr. STAMFORD Tr. SWKKTWATEK Tr. TL'SCOLA ...............40 WINTERS ................VI rain in the area with 1.42, while Clyde received .75, Baird .74, Breckenndge .69, and Lawn .57. Colorado City received .52 along with a little hail, and lightning knocked out electricity in the northeast part of the twon for about an hour. Eastland gauged .65, but a mile cast o[ Carbon 1.03 was repotted. Clyde reported some hail as did Baird and Lawn. Abilene received .29 at National Weather Service at Abilene airport and pea-size hail, bringing the total to 17.60, still short of the 20.40 normal for the year. The forecast, however, does not mention any more rain but cooler temperatures as the high Friday should reach the upper 70s, Ihe low Friday night near 50, and the high Saturday In the mid 70s. The winds will be from the west 15-2.1 m.p.h. IRS Files Liens Against 4 Men ATLANTA, Ga. (AP) The Internal Revenue Service has filed million in tax Lens apain-t four Atlanta men arrest- ed after law enforcement offi- cers seized pounds of mar- ijuana. An IRS spokesman said the liens were filed under the 1937 Marijuana Tax Act which pro- vides for a tax of per ounce or every- fraction of an ounce of marijuana. ''Three thousand pounds is a hnck of a Int of said If.e spokesman. The marijuana was seized In rcichbonnc Henry County by Georgia Bureau "of Investiga- tions accnis Oct. 10 after ihey rrrcnod an annnymous lip. The bureau said Ihe haul was worth abiut f.vn.non and was stuffed into fi.i burlap bags. NEWS INDEX End-- Ed. 93 10A 103 SB H.-rrw.-c? 9A H-v-Mcl Pcticrls 6A Ctitusrirs 3A S.TTH 15-17A Tr Yrur Grcd Hcolih IDA TV 168 Wc-rcn's Nfwt 2-4B BRADENTON, Fla. (AP) The man on Ihe witness stand hoisted his glass, toasted Ihe judge and tossed off four ounces of booze. The judge ordered another round. The witness was G5-ycar-oId Alton J. Cnthern. With the judge's approval lie was at- tempting to prove his driving wasn't impaired by drink no matter what the highway patrol breath test said. Troopers who arrested the re- turd bricklayer said his breath weighed in ai an alcohol level of .15. Porida law says a driver is drunk if it reaches .10. With Ihe bailiff playing bar- tender, Cothcrn downed eight ounces of K proof whiskey in Ihe first round nf drnvn- ttrallon Thursday. The defend- ant puf.'rd Into Ihe hrrath Irstrr ind said, "Don't rxplodc bahy." It fhowrd a reading nf .13. "This is pretty good stuff." Cothem said when the experi- ment resumed. Another brcalh test left him at .14. "I sure hate to drink hy my- Cothern said, bending his elbow again. Two half pints after Ihe dem- onstration began. Ihe machine had jumped to .18. Judge Robert Schultz ordered a recess to give the count lime to subside to Ihe level at the time of Cothem's arrest. When court reconvened. Coth- rrn. down to .16, was Ilirough Ihe standard Icsts: walk a line, stand on one !rg. touch your nose with your eyes cloiiil. During Ihe noso touching lest, Col hern dciiion.slr.llcd that he could hit his mouth every time. Guilty, said the jury. The judge ordered an invrsli- pstinn of Cothrm's background before sentencing. Stubby Soccer Cleats Cause Fewer Injuries EI.I.II: RLTKKR Q. Why did Cooper High buy sorrrr shoes for Ih? Cougars (o practice In lor Ihr Wichita Falls hall gamr? I understand that Wichita Falls would (umlshrrf them. With only one nr possibly lun games lo he played on Astrnturf Ihi; It Mfms that mnnry could have been put (o better use. A. They didn't buy them just for the Wichita Falls game. They bought them for practice because they have shorter deals and the coaches (eel they reduce Injuries. They've used Ihrm In football practice this fall and spring will wear them for all Ihe spring training. Athletic Direclor Chuck Moser said about 50 nor cent of the high schools wxrcer shoes lor praclicr. One of Ihe sporting pood stores had a rlosp-oul sale on Ihe last spring so Moscr nkajcd Ihe purchase. You know how it is, when you shop the sales and (ind a real bargain if it's something you need, you buy it. Q. Is It true nr no! that all specialists began as what we refer lo as "General 1 say no, hut I may be wrong. A. Not all MDs po into General Practice oven though Ihey are qualified to do so aflrr successfully completing medical school and one year's internship. They can practice General Medicine If they choose, bin not all nf them do. Some decide to specialize In ,t particular area of medicine and take additional training in thai field, hut they're not required to practice general medicine before becoming a specialist. Q. My nlrre wanU lo know who wrnlo thk porm; rould yon posOhly find out? It'll (Axorllr of rnlnr and hm: "A promise marir It a drht unpaid and Ihe trail own stern rndr. In Ihr riajs lo come though my lips arc mum, ah my heart bow It loathes the load." A. If were guessing we'd say Edcar Guest wTole it; sounds like him. Rut the Citv Library1 says Ihe author is Mr. Unknown. Sorry. Q. What Is the percentage of alcohol- associated arrests, such as DIM. drunk In r.ir, drunk In public etc. made hy (he Ahllene police as romparrd lo arrests nf persons suspected nf major and minor crimes. I.e.. murder, rapo. burglary and possession nl dangerous drups, marie by the same law enforcement body? Please slate percentages since Sept. A. There were total arre-ts (including Iraffic tickets issued for moving Of those involved alcohiil. so 9.7 per cent of all arrests involved alcohol. Hut if you don'l lake traffic lickcls into cimsideralion percenlages are qiiile different. There were 7W1 arrests not related lo alcohol and I.H7 arrrsls Hint alcohol, jo M per rent of thn arrcsis (not Including traffic violations) involved r.icohol. 0. A few jears ago the Pat Booties had a write-up In a magazine which I belleic was Itedbonk at Christmastime on how lo make a Nativity scene from sUrnfo.im. I'd like tn know If I might be able to get the pattern and directions for making this .is I only have part of II. I'm nnt sure of the' magazine nr Ihe A. If you know Ihe subject mailer, the City Library staff can usually come up with ihe magazine and the article in its Readers Guide, but it hit a blank wall on this one. Are you Sl.'HF, there was such an article? They looked under P.il Ilnone, Christmas Decnratinns. Nativity, styrofoam, crecho .-.ml couldn't cnine up with anything. Pos- bly a reader will turn up something help- ful.' Address questions In Arllnn IJne. Ron ;n, Abilene, Texas 7SBOI. Names will nnt he used qucsllnni must he slcned and addresses Rhen. Please Include telephone numbers II possible.   

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