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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: October 20, 1970 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - October 20, 1970, Abilene, Texas                               90TH YEAR, NO. 129 PHONE 6734271 ABILENE. TEXAS, 79604, TUESDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 20, 1970 PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS lOc DAILY-25c SUNDAY Auociated Prtu (ff) us U Tofd: <3et New Loan or Get Out Bj ELL1E nUCKER Second Peach Crop Rated More Tasty Q. We have several poach trees In our backyard. One tree Is of the J. II. Hale variety, about six years old, and has borne several crops of fruit In (he normal manner. This year the Iree produced (wo distinct crops of peaches, the first one ripening th: latter part of August and the second crop now ripen- ing. The second crop Is somewhat dwarf- ed and the seeds are small hut well- formed. They're coated with more than the average amount of fuzz. Possibly someone can explain what happened. A. County Agent II. C. Stanley said he's seen this before. It's a freak occurrence, but occasionally happens with certain varieties of peaches. Weather conditions cause it. He says the second crop is always dwarfed, but usually has a better flavor than the first crop. He's lasted some, said they were delicious and hopes his trees will do what yours did. Q. Is Ihere a public rifle range or a place In or around Abilene where we can go for largct pracllcc? _. 1 A. No public range, but the Abilene Gun Club offers family memberships for a year. They have a Ekeet, trap, pistol and rimfire rifle range on the south end of Lake Kirby, also a high-powered rifle range on the East Ft. Phantom Lake Road. Call Marshall Clark at 692-2176 for membership Information or drop by Gibson's, Mackey's or Longacre's for a membership application. Q. Please Icll me the name of the company or the organization In Dallas or somewhere that you can write lo and give an Idea for an Invention and they'll perfect It and give yon a certain per cent of the earnings or profits U the Invention turns out good. A. Jim llines. Abilene inventor, suggests you contact companies that have a need for your product. For example, if you have invented a special tractor, contact International Han-ester, Ford Motor Co., etc. When you find a company that's Interested, sell it the patent rights, but reserve a royalty so you receive a royalty on every tractor, or whatever, that is sold. He suggests you set a minimum amount that you receive per year to motivate them to sell your product rather than "shelve" it. He said contacting the companies directly is much more effective than going through an "invention" company. He should know, he did it. Q. I'm 11 years old, go to Bonham school and I don't see why we don't have air conditioners In every room. Since we have to start so early why don't we? I'll (ell you WB burn np! In Ihe afternoon our teacher (ells us to read because It's so hot he can't even teach! And another thing, why can't boys and girls wear shorts the first month of school? It's pretty disgusting Ihe way we get treated at schools as far as heat goes. Down with heat! Up with shorts and air con- ditioning? I. A. At least weatherman C. E. Silchler's on your side he's been helping you out wilh some cool weather lately. The School Board's on your side, too, because Bonham is one of the schools that's being considered for air conditioning. Now for the shorts: The Superintendent of Schools isn't real sure that shorts would help you stay cooler and doesn't think they'll change the rules on that one. Action Line thinks mini-skirts are about as cool as shorts anyway. Q. I heard recently that a well-known show-biz personality had lost all her hair due lo over-bleaching. After seeing Peggy Lee on TV recently I'm convinced she's the one. Rlghl? V.- A. Well, can't say for sure. .we contemplated a letter to Peggy Lee that started out, "Is it true that....." but decided against that course of action. Instead we called our trusted beautician who said It sounds like one of those wild rumors to her. She said with Improper bleaching or Improper care you could have breakage, but she's never heard of it causing baldness. .ever. Hope you'll settle for that a.iswcr rather than a poll of all show business people (who would probably never admit lo such a thing Address questions lo Line, Box it, Abilene, Texas 7J60I. Names will not be used, but questions must be signed inJ addresses glvrc. Please Include telephone U possible. Baptist Officials Give Choice at H-SU Meeting By BBENDA GREENE HeporterNews Slalf Writer The Baptist General Con- vention of Texas', Christian Education Commission gave the University of Corpus Christi a choice here Tuesday: Either repay a federal loan and borrw it elsewhere, or pull out of the convention. The loan was obtained to reconstruct UCC buildings after 1 Hurricane Cclia hit the Texas Gulf Coast during the summer. BAPTIST. ACTION came during a commission meeting at Hardin-Simmons University. The resolution, adopted by the group, will be presented to the executive board at the annual BGCT convention next week in Austin as the course the convention should lake In regard to the Corpus Christi school's action. Following damages of the hurricane which struck the south Texas city last summer, (he school obtained a loan from the federal government to reconstruct buildings so that the Drive Begins For Boys Club Abilene Boys Club members will be knocking on doors Tuesday night In an effort to raise money. However, they will have something to give hi return for a II a bag of Halloween candy containing 100 individually wrapped pieces of candy. This is an annual money- making project for the Boys Club, according to Bill Vlck, director. Each Loy will be wearing a while T-shirt to identify him and the bags of candy will have Boys Club lags on them. Vick requests that porch lights be left on for the boys. school could open Its doors to students already enrolled for the fall semester. However, the school obtained the loan without the approval of the BGCT, Dr. J. D. Moore, chairman of the commission, said. THE RESOLUTION stipulated (1) that the University of Corpus Christi borrow money from some agency other than the government and be prepared to repay the loan of which "she received from the Small Business Administration by Aug. 6, 1971." At that time UCC will receive title to the land on which the school is located. If the school does not accept alternative (2) That through UCC's trustees, "the University of Corpus Christi be prepared to recommend for herself an independent status...In the event the University of Corpus Christi chooses an independent status, the matter will have to be passed upon during the 1971 meeting of the Baptist General Convention of Texas." (3) That the chairman of the Christian Education Commission appoint an advisory committee of 3-5 members from Texas Baptists of financial expertise to aid UCC in finding authorized by the executive FOLLOWING THE hurricane damage, the executive board committed to UCC of which was for indebtedness and operational expenses and was for damage repair. However, the SBA loan preempted the 000, earmarked for repairs, Dr. Woodson Armes, executive secretary of the commission, said Tuesday morning. "We are See BAPTIST, Pg. 2A 5 Shot, Dumped In Swimming Pool By DOUG WILLIS Associated Press Writer SANTA CRUZ, Calif. (AP) The bodies of an eye surgeon, his wife, two sons and a secre- tary were found Monday night bound, shot and dumped In the swimming pool of their hill top home, which was de- stroyed by fire. Each of the five victims had been shot once in the back of Ihe head, and Ihe physician had a second wound in the upper back, Sheriff Douglas James said. Their wrists were bound In front wilh brightly colored scarves, James said, and scarves covered Ihe faces of three victims. "It was like an said Sheriff's U. Kenneth Pit- tenger. No motive was estab- lished. Patches of blood slained the ccmenl apron around the pool. The secretary's body was float- ing, the others were on the pool bottom. The victims were Dr. Vidor M. Ohta, 45; his wife, Virginia, 43; their sons, Dcrik, 12, and NEED Look around the house and garage for those items that you no longer use. Sell them in the Family Week-Ender v FRI.-SAT.-SUN. 3 Lines 3 Days Hi CllMIlM V II nil Rl't Aoproximaltlir 12 Avtraat Wordi No Phoni Ordm Picon .i Only 00 fOc Each Additional Una CASH IN ADVANCE YOU SAVE ABILENE REPORTER-NEWS DEADUNE THURS. 3 P.M. Taggart, 11, and Ohla's secre- tary, Dorothy Cadwallader, 33. The killers left no notes James said. He said no sign of struggle was found in the house, located atop a hill overlooking Monterey Bay between Sanla Cruz and Sequel, 100 miles south of San Francisco. Al aboul p.m., two sher- iff's deputies noticed smoke and went to Ihe home. One driveway was blocked by Ohla's Itolls-Hoyce, the other by Mrs. Cadwallader's Lincoln Continental. Both automobiles were locked and the officers had lo push them aside when fire- men arrived. Live Oak Fire Chief Ted Pound, searching for a water supply to extinguish the blaze, found the bodies in the pool. The sheriff said he believed the death bullets came from .30-calibcr weapons. James add- ed it appeared more than one person was involved in the kill- ings. The Ohlas had two daughters away at 18, at a college in New York, and Lark See POOL, Pg. 2A MY LAI DEFENDANT AND WIFE AT FORT HOOD S.Sgt, David Mitchell after bearing ex-soldiers (AP Wlrtphili) Mitchell Trial Testimony My Lai By ROBERT HEARD v Associated Press Writer FT. HOOD, Tex. (AP) A third former soldier pointed his finger at S. Sgt. David Mitchell and identified him today as the man he saw pour automatic ri- fle fire into a ditch crowded with South Vietnamese civilians in 1968. v Gregory Olsen, a student and part-lime grocery employe from Portland, Ore., testified as have Iwo others that he saw Mitchell shoot into the ditch at My Lai, where there vrere up to 24 South Vietnamese, only a few of them still alive. Olsen, a machinegunner on the day of the alleged assault, said he crossed the ditch and observed "12 to two dozen" Viet- namese there. "They appeared to be mostly women and children. Most ap- peared lo be shot. Mosl ap- peared lo be dead. But some were alive. They looked at me and followed me with their eyes." Olsen said he saw Sgt. Milch- ell "walk over to the ditch He raised his M16 rifle in a fir- ing position, against his shoul- der, and at Ihat time I heard M16 shots." Oiscn said the muzzle of WEATHER U S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Nilioul Wtithtr Scrvict (Wfiirier Mjp, Pg- 4-A) ABILENE AND VICINITY (43-mile to partly clcuOy ind wirrrifr fed ay, tcnight ind Wrtnesfiiy. twHy ittout 71 low tnrigrii iSo-ji 57. Wrcrcsday U. SouTnwMlfrnly windj 3-10 m.p.n. Tueitiiy. TEMPERATURES Mondir P.ni.....Tuesdjy a.m. Said Shot in Ditch 41 il t! JJ 52 47 5.CO 1 00 ion tie I 00 ic.ca 11.00 a a tt si 31 il (7 H'gl ir.l lOV. fir II fCU'l K-C l.m.: 61 ind II. Mich ird Icr urr.e dite ytir: 10 ind tl Sunin Mil nioni: p.m. iunifl p.m. Biromitfr riifling nren: 11.31. Humiairy it neon: 66 per cfrt. Mitchell's rifle was pointed into the ditch and that he heard 10 to 12 shots fired semi-automati- cally. Two other solders testified Monday they saw Mitchell fire into the ditch from two sides. "I seen a woman get side of her head blown off. After that I walked Dennis Conli, 21, a Providence, R.I., truck driver, teslified Monday. Conli and Charles Sledge, 23, of Sardis, Miss., luggage plant employe, said they saw Mitchell and Mitchell's platoon leader, Calley, fire short bursts of auto- matic fire from their M16 rifles into the ditch. Calley has been ordered court-martialed on charges of murdering 102 unarmed civil- ians at My Lai. His trial is scheduled to begin at Ft. Ben- ring, Ga., on Nov. 16. Mitchell, 30, of St. Francis- ville, La., is charged with as- sault with intent to commit murder. He could be sentenced to 20 years at hard labor if con- victed. Conli said he was a mine sweeper and was armed wilh an M79 grenade launcher on March 16, 1968 when his company swept through My Lai. At one point, he said, he heard gunfire ajid went to see what it was. "I saw Calley and Mitchell. Industrials Gain At 4fh Hour End Industrials were up 1.71, Iransuiiiiation was off .07, and utilities were up .06 at the end of fourlh hour trading Tuesday on the New York Slock Ex- change. The New York Composilc was lip 20 cents. Volume was 000 shares, reported the Abilene office of Schneider, Bcmct and Hickman, Inc. They were sending off lo the side. I noticed they were firing down. I noticed there were peo- ple there. A few of them were yelling and he said. Then he saw part of the woman's head blown off, he said. Conti estimated Uicre were "about 30, maybe more" civil- ians in the ditch. Sledge, a radio-telephone op- erator that day, estimated "M to 30" were In the ditch. Both men testified they re- ceived no hostile fire that day.''" Both said they had not seen any weapons taken from the ci- vilians. Sledge said Calley talked briefly with Mitchell after the Sec TRIAL, Pg. 2A Has 'Guest Rule' Cut Private Clubs? By JIM CONXEY Slalf Wriler Private clubs in Abilene aulhorized to serve liquor claim about 640 fewer members this year than last, according to figures from Loyd Chi district supervisor of Ihe Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission (ABC) in Abilene. When club licenses were renewed Sept. 1, 23 duhs were operating, compared wilh 27 in 1969. The number of members claimed by the clubs last year was about 3.265 while arc claimed for the 1970-71 year. OWENS WOULD not theorize on why these clubs closed but it would not be too hazardous to speculate Ihat the ABC's controversial "guest card rule" still under litigation could be responsible. Owens noted that Ihe rule has requirements such as fiat a club must have at least 25 members, a permanent membership committee and regular food sen-ice adequate for its members and In addition, Ihe rule says that guests' bills must be sent lo the members who sponsor them. A PARTICULAR acgravation to the ABC, according lo Abilene Murderer Dies in Courthouse Gunfighf CHICAGO (AP) A convict- ed murder who boasted Ihat he would never die in the electric chair was shot and killed by po- lice as he held pistols lo Ihe heads of two hostages. Using a gun authorities said was smuggled to him In a book which had its pages cut out, Gene R. Ixiwis, 27, tried lo cs- cape from the CrimlnM Courts Hullding Monday shortly after a routine hearing. Lewis was sentenced In Fcb- niary to die for the 1S63 murder of a guard for a mobile check- cashing service. As he was led from Ihe court- room Monday, I.cwis pulled a gun and forced Waller Makows- kl, a special agent guarding him, into an elevator using the unarmed guard's body as a shield. He fired one shot from the elevator at a guard. They got off the elevator one floor Lewis pushed M a k o w s k I through the door of a courtroom and fired several more shots. Inside the com (room he took an- other gun from a guard and look Michael Stevenson, an as- sistant state's attorney, hostage. Alarms sounded throughout the building. .v l-cwis emerged from the courtroom wilh the two host- ages and shot Karlin, 55, a lawyer, in Ihe hip. As Lewis advanced down a hallway, an officer hiding in a closet, Lee Hamilton, jumped out, put his gun to Lewis' head and ordered him lo drop his weapons. "lewis turned. I .'hot three Hamilton said laler. Other officers ihcn opened lire. Stevenson was wounded in the arm. Makowski suffered a liowdcr burn. Lewis was arrested Feb. Ifi, 1M9, a-d escaped from Cook County Jail 10 days later afier he swilched identities wilh a burglary suspect, posied bond and walked out. He was arrest- ed several days later In Atlanta. atlorney Tom Gordon who Is chairman of Ihe commission, has been clubs which attempt lo skirt Ihe law by making persons "guesls'' of the bartender or a waitress. Cordon has said that some clubs have "mistakenly interpreted" the court's decision as a go ahead and are not complying with the Texas Liquor Control Act. The art "does not authorize the sale of alcoholic beverages by private clubs and the pretext of making Ihe customer a guest is he said. Cordon said Tuesday that Rule 56, the one under lit'igation, was appealed to ihe U.S. Supreme Court by two Dallas clubs afler the Texas Supreme Court upheld the controversial rule July 8. "WHAT THIS Gordon said, "is Ihat we are sort of stymied at the moment on enforcement of alleged violations where the rule is involved. We would be In contempt of the court if we altempted to enforce it." Gordon said the Dallas clubs arc mainly in contention with the portion of Ihe rule which requires food service in the clubs. He said the rule Is now simply In a '-slate of abeyance." pending the court's consideration. 1WS INDEX Amusements 9B Bridge................7A Business I2A Classified............ 6-9B i Cr-m.ci SB Edilonoli 4B Hcrcsccpe 7A Hoipiicl Pclierttt........4A Obituoriei 3A Sports I0.11A To Ycur Gxd Health____7A SB Womtn's I   

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