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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: October 10, 1970 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - October 10, 1970, Abilene, Texas                               Permian 34 Abilene 15 Cooper 24 Odessa 7 Winters Ballinger Easfland 51 Comanche 0 Rofan Wylie 34Sweelwater7 Snyder 0 Clyde 39 Cisco 7 Big Spring 34 Midland 21 Albany 22 Anson 0 KnoxCily 20 Munday 6 B'wood 37 Hirschi 0 Reporter "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH 90TH YEAR, NO. 119 PHONE 6734271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, SATURDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 10, Israel Claims Proof Soviets Man Missiles By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Israel said Friday it has "pho- tographic and oilier evidence proving lhat Russians arc man- ning Sam 3 missiles" deployed by Egypt along the Suez Ca'nul in violation of the Middle East cease-fire. A military spokesman in Tel Aviv did not say what the "oili- er evidence" was, but observers believe it may include intercept- ed radio communications be- tween Russians and Egyptians at the siles inside the tease-fire zone on (he Egyptian-held west side of the canal. In Washington, Secretary of Stale William P. Rogers backed up the Israeli assertion. He said America has conclusive evi- dence of Egyptian violations in the canal truce and added: "I think beyond doubt Soviet personnel have been there to as- sist in construction of those siles" for missiles. Both Rogers ami the Tel Aviv spokesman were responding to a brusque Moscow denial that Rogers Comments, Pg. 8-A Soviet personnel were involved. Moscow charged that Israel was violating Hie U.S.-sponsored cease-fire by constant flights over Egyptian territory and with the construction of fortifi- cations along the Israeli side of the canal. Israel's Premier Golda Meir in a radio broadcast to the peo- ple on the eve of Yom Kippur, Israel's most solemn religions holiday, said the "war js not V E To Solve 3 By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS "President Nixon ordered F1U Director J. Edgar Hoover Fri- day to find the persons responsi- ble for three West Coast terror- ist bombings for which under- ground groups have claimed credit. Nixon said Thursday's bomb- ings, which came on the third 'anniversary of the death of Che Guevara, demonstrated the need for tough federal anli- bombing legislation. There were no injuries in the bombings, which damaged a military armory, a campus HOTC building and a court- house. There have been no arrests in SALUTE WOUNDS 5 New Republic Off TO Shaky Start PHNOM PENH, Cambodia (AP) J- The new Cambodian re- public proclaimed Friday morn- ing came into being so hurriedly that things went wrong at the ceremony. So swiftly was the decision taken to end more than years of monarchy thai the gov- ernment had less than a week to prepare for the celebrations. A concrete monument to the republic in a park, renamed Re- public Square, was completed only hours before it was inaugu- rated by Premier Lon Nol. The top of (he monument now has developed a distinct list. The new Cambodian flag that IVEATHER" U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE fcSSA WEATHER BUREAU (WcalhCr Map, Pg. 1-D] ABILENE AND VICINITY (40-mile radius) Clear to partly cloudy and warmor Ihroucjli Sunday, High Saturday 75. Low Saturday niqhi 50.' Hlah on Sunday near 60. Southerly 5 to 10 TEMPERATURES Frf. p.m. 4t> 59 45 60 45 63 61 Jl............. 65 43 64 43 61 A3 St A7 ________... 53 51 55............. 58 Hfgh and Inw lor 2-1.hours ending 9 p.m.: 65 arid 43. High and tow same dale last year: 33 and 60. Sunsel last night: sunrise lodflv; suniOl tonlglir: 7-12. Ortromctcr reading at p.m.: 78.17. Humidity al 9 45 per cent. Nol hoisted in front of the royal palace differed from oth- ers flown around the city. A design for (he flag was Ihe subject of a rambling debate in Hie National Assembly only Wednesday. It was agreed to place three while star.s on a blue ensign, with a white profile of Ihe fabled temples of Angkor on a red field in. the upper left- hand corner. The positioning of the stars was left somewhat vague. The flag raised by Lon Nol had the stars localed on the bottom. Otiier flags in Phnom Penh had the stars al the top. Tticre were elements of im- provisation in the timetable of Ihe ceremonies. They originally were scheduled to last more lhan two hours. They were te- lescoped to less than half that time when it was found Ihe orig- inal timetable would have left officials with a long period dur- ing which they had nothing to do. A navy gun used to fire the traditional 101-gun salute ex- ploded after firing less than a dozen rounds, wounding five sai- lors. Tiie ammunition was American and was flown in especially for the celebration. Only n few hours before Presi- dent Ini Tarn of the National As- sembly rose lo proclaim the re- public, Cambodian soldiers were attacked by enemy troops 5'A miles from the capital. (he bombings. But poliM, noting they had several leads, were in- vestigating the theory that Ihe incidents were part of a radical conspiracy. The President's reaction cama shortly after a group iden- tifying itself as "The Weather- man Underground" claimed re- sponsibility for the bombing lhat wrecked a courtroom and a rest room at the Marin County Civic Center in San Hafael, Cal- if. Earlier, a Seattle group known as The Quarter Moon Tribe said it planted Ihe bomb thai caused an estimated damage to Navy and Air Force facilities at Ihe Uni- versily of Washington. Another organization, ''Per- fect Park Home Grown Garden took credit for the bombing of a National Guard armory in Santa Barbara, Cal- if., dedicating the act "to all re- volutionary people throughout (he world wherever they fight for love and freedom and life it- over yet" but predicted peace lay ahead. "We she said "that the peace will come because it is vital lo our neighbors not less lhan lo ourselves. And when it comes, enormous reserves will be released for Ihe advance- ment of our region and ihe pros- perity of its inhabitants." Cairo radio charged tne Unit- ed States withdrew from peace lalks at Ihe Unilcd Nations as part of a campaign of hostility to Egypt "with Ihe aim of con- fusing the revolutionary leader- ship." The United Slates pulled out of Big Four deputy representa- tives lalks in an attempt to press the Russians and Egyp- tians inlo removing Soviet mis- siles from the Suez Canal. Cairo radio declared that if the missiles are moved any- where, "they will be moved for- ward, where they can be more effective." The Popular Front of the Lib- eration of Palestine issued a statement in Beirut, the Le- banese capital, accusing Israel of going back on a deal by which the guerrillas released hi- jacked airliner hostages. "We shall deal a strong relal- ialory blow to America's and Is- rael's failure lo honor ilieir side of the Ihe slatcment said. EXACTLY AS IT GES IN FOUR SECTIONS lOc SUNDAY Sweetwater queen Bridget Feagan, 17, was named Homecoming Queen Sweetwater High School Friday night at the Sweetvvater-Snyder game. The SHS senior was escorted by Ric Rhodes. (Staff Photo by Billy Adams) to Probe Air Firms WASHINGTON (AP) Secre- tary of Transportation John A. Volpe ordered Friday a sweep- ing investigation of the air char- ter industry and the way the Federal Aviation Administra- tion regulates it. Volpe said the probe was prompted by the 30-dealh disas- ter in the crash of a rented Wichita Slate University foot- ball plane in the Rockies a week ago. The FAA has said it warned both Wichita State and another school two months ago against using the small firm flying the look no aclion to stop the firm itself. Volpe bypassed the FAA in or- dering the probe and put it di- rectly under control of Iris of- fice. He named a newly appointed aide, Adm. Willard ,1. Smith, to conduct tlie investigation. Smith, former head of the Coast Guard, was confirmed by Ihe WHY EAST TEXAS WATER SHOULD STAY GOI1 gubernatorial candidate Paul ERgcrs Staff photo by Larry Thomas IN EAST TFA'AS explains in Abilene Senale this week as assistant secretary of transportation for safely. The FAA cracked down a day earlier on two Oklahoma City firms that leased the plane and crew to Wichita State for its itl- fated football trip to Utah Slate Oct. 2. The agency lifted the license of Golden Eagle Aviation Inc. after ruling it did not have a certificate to fly a passenger plane as large as the one that crashed. It handed a fine lo the plane's owner, Jack Ri- chards Aircraft Co. Inc., and grounded all his other planes for emergency inspections. However, the FAA conceded it did nol know until the crash that Golden Eagle bad been flying Wichita. State's basketball and football teams for nearly a year. And despite Iwo warnings in August to Wichita State and Tulsa about Golden Eagle's lack of a sufficient passenger li- cense, the FAA took no action to caution the firm itself. Volpe announced Smith "will examine FAA regulations gov- erning charter operations with a view toward correcting any de- ficiency which may be discov- ered." He added the invosligalion will "spare no effort, lime or re- sources in determining the true condition of every chartered op- eration in (he Unilcd Stales." In a new development Friday, Ihe FAA in Washington said il had indeed warned Golden Ea- gle in the inspeclor it named in Oklahoma City con- tradicted this. The inspector, Mel Hanson, to the FAA an- no one ever told his office that Golden Eagle was trying to fly for Tulsa and Wichita State. "I didn't have any knowledge of he said. Hanson said his only contact with Golden Eagle was nearly a year go when he culioned the firm in general that it shouldn't have any connection with flying larger aircraft, Cellmate Teslifies Susan Admitted Killing Sharon Tale LOS ANGELES (AP) A woman who shared a jail cell with Susan Atkins testified at the Sharon Tale trial Friday that M-iss Alkins told her she killed the actress. The witness, Virginia Gra- ham, said Miss Atkins told her of the killings of five Tate vic- tims and said "she wanted to take their eyes out and squash them against the wall and cut off their fingers, but she didn't have time." Mrs. Graham said Miss At- kins, in describing the killing of Miss Tate, "said lhat when the knife went in it felt soft and it was quite a thrill." After it was over, "she said See TATE, Pg. 2-A Eggers Favors iecycling Water LOWKR 'POT' POSSESSION TO MISDEMEANOR but lie tough on pushers Paul Eggers By JIM CONI.EY .Reporter-News staff Writer I! c p u b 1 i c an gubernatorial candidalc Paul Eggers explained Friday in Abilene why he believes East Texas water sl.ould remain in East Texas. "I live in West (lie Nov. 3 opponent of Gov. Presion Srr.ith said, "and I favor a high priority for a workable water plan for West Texas, with its strong dependence on agriculture. "Bui we've gol to work for a program lhat is ecologically as well as economically Jie said during an interview before shaking al Taylor Counly GOP Headquarters. KGGF.RS SAID thai alternatives to bringing the water from oulsido the area include "recycling of which he said some cities in California have done, and removing the from walcr. "Also, we have water lhat stands and evaporates in West he said, "and we need lo look more closely to sec what can bo done about this waste." The candidate said lhat people who have studied the proposal lo bring water to West Texas have questioned the type of water it would be once it gels here. Also in Abilene Friday, Eggers called on Gov. Smith "to reconsider his refusal to accept (he public spirited offer made by the Texas League of Women Voters and 16 television stations for a joint appearance lo discuss issues in the governor's race. "SINCE SO many political leaders, including myself and presumably the governor, are concerned about voter apathy this is an excellent opportunity lo stimulate interest in the he said. Egjjcrs concluded that "our state fa'jos many problems and challenges. This is no time for political leaders (o sweep them under the rug. have a full and open discussion of the issues TODAY'S MEWS INDEX Inability to get enough names on a petition for a unit-road project for Taylor County is blamed on opathy, complexity of the issue and other work projects. See story Pg. 1-C. Amusements 8A Bridge 7 A Church Ncwi 4, 5, 9, IOC Closiifkd 3-8D Comlci ................6, 7C Erfilorlall 10 Form ]D Markets............. 8, ?C Obituaries 3. 9A. Oil 6A. Sporfs 1-88 Log 7A TV Scout................7A Women's Nowi 2, 3B so we can have an informed electorate and a large voter participation." Eggcrs made the following comments on the drug issue: "I wanl a law thai will really be longh on pushers, and then, go afler them. Second, I want a law that if a person has a cer- tain amount of drugs in his possession he would be classified as a pusher. The slale of Washington, for example, says 40 ounces is a pusher." he said. ALSO, EGGERS favors misdemeanor penalty for first offense marijuana possession, lowering it from a felony because "nine oul of 10 users of Piarijuana are experimenters. With a misdemeanor, the person could be arrested and reeducated." EgRers also advocates more education on drugs, saying lhat the present public school drug e d u c a 11 o n program is Inadequately funded. "if I were governor, I would put the priority for (Iiug education far above, for example, the millions of dollars spent (in Austin) for a parking lot for slate employes. "The lot is he added, "but not before drug education." Asked about ihe argument that lowering penalties for crimes (drug possession, for does not help reduce crime, he said that since the "first offense driving while intoxicated" penalty had been lowered Jo a misdemeanor, "second offenses have been less. The driver knows that second lime jusl must not happen." Eggers is for a powerful governorship, "The Texas governor ranks 49th In power (among governors) in the United he said. HIS STRONG position U reflected in his criticism of Gov. Smilh walking out at the Untver- Sec ECiGERS, Pg. 3-A J   

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