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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: October 5, 1970 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - October 5, 1970, Abilene, Texas                               OR WITH OFFENSE TO FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT 90TH YEAR. NO. 113 PHONE AD1LENE. TEXAS, 79604, MONDAY EVENING. OCTOBER 5. 1970-TH1RTY PAGES IN SECTIONS IQc DAILY-25c SUNDAY Auociattd tfP) r-t i.., He's Not Dead A U.S. medevac chopper kicks up dust scout lying in foreground, suffering from an as it comes in for landing at Mai Loc, apparent heat stroke, medics said. (AP Wire- Vietnam, to take aboard a Montagnard Hawley Gets .95; German Police More Rain Expected Take Gl Trio Thunderclouds in Ihe Big Counlry didn't waste any lime Monday morning in dumping up lo 35 inch of rain at Hawley during a Hi hour period. Sir 1 p ABILENE Mon. Municipal Airport .33 Total for year 16.91 Normal for Year 18 E3 ANSON Tr-BAIHD Tr. BRECKENRIDGE Tr. COLEMAN Tr. COLORADO CITY -27 HAMLIN Tr. HAWLEY LAWN -38 MERKEL -M PAINT ROCK Tr. ROTAN Tr. SNYDER Tr. STAMFORD Tr. SWEETWATER Tr. WINTERS received .38 inch, beginning shortly before dawn, and weathermen forecast more rain throughout Monday, ending rainfall for the year is 16.91 inches, still below the 18.66 normal for this date. Elsewhere in the area, Merkcl received .60, Lawn .38, Winters .30, and Colorado City .27. The forecast calls for a 50 per rent chance of rain Monday, decreasing to 20 per cent Monday night. The high both Monday and Tuesday will be 85-90 and the low Monday night should be near 70. NEWS INDEX 10-I3B Ccmics 9B Editorials SB Ycur Gccd Healih 78 TV Log 13B Ncwi 4 53 PUTTGARDEN, Germany (AP) Three American soldiers who escaped from military police in Crailsheim with the help of 15 to 20 fellow blacks were apprehended police in this north- German city. A U.S. Army spokesman in Heidelberg, Mho confirmed the arrests, said the three were seized on an express train lhal cross by ferry into Denmark. The three were being taken to a military stockade when the three military' policemen escorting them were disarmed, pwlke reported, and their vehicle taken. 1 The prisoners armed-lhemselvcs wild (wo automatic weapons and forced one of the military policemen to drive Ihem lo Erlangen, near Nuernberg, where they fled on foot, the report added. Before leaving Crailsheim, police said, the trio failed in an attempt lo rob a taxicab driver. Township in New Jersey Too High UPPER FREEHOLD TOWN- SHIP, N.J. (AP) Mayor Wai- ter L. Polhemus, whose ances- tors settled here in 1632, says he's leaving town because the taxes arc too high. Republican Mayor Polhemus, 60, a retired farmer, said over the weekend he is moving to a farm near Shenandoah, Va. "Taxes are the whole said Ihe mpyor. "Taxes are get- ting entirely loo high. School taxes, county taxes and state taxes are all too high, that's why I'm moving." Polhemus served 15 years on the township's governing com- of them as mayor he will be selling a home and farm not far from Polhe- mustown, a part of the township named after his forebears. Polhemus said he worked hard to keep local taxes down, but that all around him, the county, stale and school board were raising theirs. "You try to keep them down, but the schools and the state keep raising he said. "We haven't put any street lights in for three just can't afford it.1' He said the township had no control over the school budget, but that he had made sugges- tions from time to time and kept a list of all the "extras" in the local schools he thought unnec- essary. are just too many he said. "They have a track thai cosl to build and then they had to go out and pay somebody to teach the kids how lo run on Polhemus said. The mayor said he now pays 1 about a year in property taxes. On his new home in Vir- ginia he will pay about one- tenth that, he said. As soon as he finds a buyer for his house he will leave, but there's a snag. "The firsl thing a buyer asks he said, "is Ihe tax rale." L Cambodia Votes To End Monarchy By JOHN T. WHEELER Associated Press Writer PHNOM PENH (AP) _ Cam- bodia's national assembly and senate voted unanimously today to end their country's ancient monarchy and replace il with a republic. The legislators al a jcinl ses- sion said (he republic would be proclaimed OcL 9 and would go into effect Nov. 1. Chief of State Chen Heng leaves Oct. 9 to speak lo the U.N. General As- sembly in New York. I The switch to a republic is de- signed chiefly as a blow against Prince Norodom Sihanouk, the deposed chief of slate and head of Ihe royal house, who has sel up a in Pe- king. Western political observ- ers said that while the constitu- tional changes that would result were not yet clear, they doubted that Ihere would be any immediate change in Premier Lon Nol's governmenl or ils op- crations. Chen Heng is expected to re- main as chief of state. He was elected by Ihe parliamenl when il deposed Sihanouk in mid- March. By proclaiming a republic, Ihe govemmenl undoubtedly hopes to undermine Sihanouk's claims that he is still the right- ful chief of state. The govern- ment also hopes that abolition of the monarchy will help wipe oul Ihe loyalty to the prince and his family thai lingers among the peasants in the countryside. Lon Nol, who headed the gov- ernmenl under Sihanouk, began LEATHER U. t. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ESSA WEATHER BUREAV (WilTTlf r MIB; Pf-1 ABILENE AND VICINITY lo partly cleuCy t'LnefnMmfri Htnen, wocrg Atoroiy riaht. High Mcnday and Tytsday IJ-M. the w.crcay nifit 70. vvinii Irwn sovlh 10 :o m p h. Prcbability cf rain 50 per cerl Merely and 73 per ceit Wcnfiiy nqM. TEMPERUURES Sunday p.m. Monday a.m. II 71 Hi 71 II ._.......... 71 II IM a i] jco ir II 71 II 7.M 7J 7) 70 73 9.fO 70 74 M 71 70 71 .......ll.CO .....74 and low fcf U houri tndirj f am.: 13 and M. and lew for UTie ea'e latt year: II and it. Sunwl last a.m. Sunrist IMay: a.m. Suriet p.m. Barorr.eter reading at 71 II. HLmitfJy ar noon: tr ptr cent. promising to proclaim a repub- lic soon after he deposed the prince lasl March 18. For Ihe past month the government press agency has been publish- ing constitutions of Asian and western democracies and re- publics to stir up public interest. Sihanouk in a recent broad- cast from Peking noted Lon Nol's plans and said Cambodia has been a de facto republic since I960, when he refused to take Ihe throne of his dead fath- er and had himself named chief of stale instead. Sihanouk said the present constitution could serve for a republic if it was amended. In voting for a republic today, Ihe legislators cited the parlia- ment's election of Sihanouk in 1960 as precedent for their ac- tion. In Ihe war, Cambodian troops beat back a heavy 11-hour at- tack on a base on Phnom Penh's highway to the sea, but enemy forces cut the highway to Bat- lambang and Ihe Thai border. Brownwood Shooting Scrape Leaves Two Victims Dead BROWNWOOD Two Brownwood men died of gunshot wounds Sunday as a result of a shootout in a Depot Street night- spot. Dead at the scene about 4 a.m. iras Joe Robert Guinn, 26. James H. Ramos, also in his twenties, died at p.m. Sunday in West Texas Medical Center at Abilene. Services for Guinn are pending al Wright's Funeral Home in Brownwood, while Davis-Mom's Funeral is handl- ing services for Ttamos. The Ramos funeral will be at 4 p.m. Tuesday al St. Mary's Calholic Church In Brownv.-ood with burial in Greenleal Cemetery. A THIRD MAN, Frank Ramirez, 23, of Sydney, was in satisfactory condition in Broira- wood Community Hospital Monday morning with lacera- tions believed to have been received in the fight, a hospital spokesman said. Brownwood Police Lt. Vic Fowler said Monday that charges probably would be filed against three men in connection with the shootings and thai "Iwo others may be charged." Deputy No-Billed In Doctor's Death SIXTOX, Tex. (AP) The granrl jury refused to indict Dep- uty Sheriff Eric Baugh today in the shooting death of hippie Dr. Fred E. Logan Jr. in a case that shook this South Texas area. Logan, a Malhis osteopath, worked particularly among Ihe .Mexican-American poor at Main- is and his shooting death brought an outcry from Chicano leaders. Dr. Logan, 31, was killed July 11 on the parking lot of a res- taurant on the edge of Mathis where he had been drinking beer. Witnesses said the doctor was tipsy and had (rouble riding his motorcycle. A friend took the keys away. Angered, Ihe doctor produced a pistol and fired il several times into the air. Of- ficers were called. Deputy Baugh answered the call and talked Logan into giv- ing up the pistol, then put the doctor into the back scat of the patrol car. En route, said the deputy, Lo- gan, an ex-paratrooper, unlocked the door, got out, and began beating the deputy, recently out nf a hospital. (laugh said he fired a warning shot, and hnl- stercd his pistol. He said the doctor renewed the fight, and then, said the deputy, he fired point-blank. The Mathis City Council grew incensed and passed a resolu- tion saying in part lhal the death "suggests the possibility of a political murder." It de- manded the resignation of Baugh, who was suspended by the sheriff's department. It re- named the main streei "Dr. Logan Avenue." Mexican-Americans held pro- Icsl meetings. About at- tended the doctor's funeral. ".FOWLER SAID the light apparently was a flareup and did not last long. He said one subject was taken into custody at the scene when police arrived shortly after the shootings. Ramos is survived by his wile, two daughters, Sophia and Priscilla, all of Ihe home; his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ilamiro Ramos of Brownwood; four brothers, Jesse of Dallas, Joe of Waco, Richard and Felix of Brownwood; six sisters, Mrs. Geneva Santos of Houston, Mrs. Mary Hen-era of Waco; Mrs. Jne Medina of Los Angeles, Mrs. Richard Marquez of Dallas and Mrs. Sammy Hernandez and Miss Mary "Ramos of Brown- wood. Guinn was born June In Del Rio. He is survived by his wife, Yolanda, of the home; three daughters, Salina Ann, Vickie Sue and Sandra Kathleen; his stepfather and mother. Mr. and .Mrs. Oscar Cochran of Brown- wood; one sister, Mary Parez of Brownwood, two brothers, Cisto Dominguez of Brownwood and Daniel Esparza of Del Rio. All Issues Gain Al 4lh Hour End Industrials were up 7.39, transportation was up 1.54, and utilities were up .10 at the end of fourth hour trading Monday on the New York "Stock Ex- change. The New York Com- posite was up .50. Volume was shares, reported the Abilene office of Schneider, Bernet and Hickman, Inc. Moon Temperatures Varied 400 Degrees Burglar at Merke! Makes Haul i i MERKEL.- Crawford's De- partment Store here was burg- larized early Monday and worth of men's clothing was taken, according to store owner Onls Crawford. Crawford's is In the wmc building as Bragg's Department Store and one door enters Inlo both stores, but apparently nothing was taken from Bracg's. was made by breaking out a glass in the front door and 1 unlocking the door from the inside, according lo Merkcl Police Chief- Mike Drilcy. Taken in the burglary were 44 men's suits, 20 men's sports coats and 21 pair of men's slat's, valued at Drilcy said. Abilene police and the Taylor County sheriff's office were notified of the burglary. By ELL1ERUCKER Q. What were the coolest temperatures recorded on the way to Ibe moon and at the moon's surface? A. Extremes in temperature run from 250 degrees zero to 250 above, in space as well as on the moon, says Milton Rein, information officer for Ihe Manned Spacecraft Center. Temperature varies depending on the angle which the sun hits the lunar surface and Ihe space module. When the Apollo H astronauts were walking on the moon, Ihe front of (heir suits which directly faced the sun registered 230 degrees above 7cn> while it was ISO degrees below 7cro on the backs of Ihcir suits which were In the shade. Because of these tcmjKiraturc extremes, the tpacecralt rolls constantly on lls trip lo Ihe moon, in an attempt lo keep temperature (airly even.., Q. After years of attempting an avocado seed, I've finally succeeded. It's grow Ing beautifully on (he nortb side cf the house, and has reached a height of 14 Inches. I'm In a quandary as to whether It should be left outside this winter or polled and brought Inside. U Ihe latter, what type of polling soil should be used, what should I feed It and how moch sunlight will It need? Please nole lhal I live la OUahnma City. A. Bring it Inside whether you iivc In Abilene or Oklahoma City, says plant ex- pert Paula Carter. It's a tropical plant and likely to freeze. The easy way is to Just leave it in a large pot, then pull the entire pot uut of the ground when you want lo bring il inside, or Just leave it Indoors year round. Mrs. Carter says It makes an Ideal houseplant and that you won't have any avocndocs anyway, unless you have another i plant for cross-pollination. i It needs some light, not necessarily direct sunlight, KO an cast vlndow Is Ideal. For soil, use a combination of land, leaf mold and a little peat moss or any good prepared sterile potting soil. For food, 3 planting tablet or v.ater-soluble food Is suitable. Q. Where can I lake Yoga? I'm very Interested lo It. Also bow much does It cost? A. We'd tell you how much It costs i! we could find someone who was teaching it, but we hit a blank wall. Some Yoga exercises arc taught in the Slimnastics Class at the YWCA, if thai helps. Bala Krishna. Yogi, crosses Ihe country periodically and usually stops In Abilene to teach a class, but he hasn't notified anyons that he's on his way. His book, "Essence of Yoga for Everlasting Youth" can be purchased at the it's a version wilh drawings and Instructions. The "Y" will organize a Yoga class If enough are Interested. Call them al 677-5321. Q. Recently I was wmmoncd to appear In City Court at City Hall In Judge Joanne Stranss'i court. Isn't there some way (bat a public address system conld be Installed In this court- room? Sometimes her voice doesn't carry well and at times she bas to repeal what she says. P.S. I have not re- celved payment lor appearing even though I wasn't chosen (o sit on the jury. Should I cipect payment? A. No, In Municipal Court you're paid only if you sit on the jury. Asst. City Manager John Hatchcl hadn't heard thai anyone was having difficulty hearing in the courtroom; he appreciates its being brought to his atten- tion and will certainly look into IL Judge Strauss was, also unaware that her voice wasn't carrying and said she's glad to Know this, she'll try to spjak more slowly and distinctly. She doesn't want to recom- mend a P.A. system because of the expense, but will speak louder now lint she's aware of Ihe problem. Address questions lo Action Line, Box i Ablltoc, Tuas 79WI. Names will not be used bat questions must be signed and addresses given. Please Include telephone numbers II possible.   

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