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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: September 24, 1970 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - September 24, 1970, Abilene, Texas                                "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT BOTH YEAR, NO. jQl PHONE 673-4271 ABILENK, TEXAS, 79604, THURSDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 24, PAGES IN FOUR SECTIONS IQc SUNDAY Associated Press (ff) of the Victor Former State Sen. Jimmy Carter breaks into a broad--smile as early returns in Qeorgia gave him a lead of almost-2-1 in Wednesday's Democratic runoff against former Gov. Carl Sanders. With Hie state's precincts re- porting, Carter had voles, 59.1. per cent of the total. Sanders had or 40.9 per cent. The defeat was a crushing one for Sanders, who entered the primary as the .favorite. Carter will meet Republican nominee Hal Suit in the Nov. 3 general election. (AP Wirephoto) otist Mother 'Shocked' Daughter's Drug-Selling SALT LAKE CITY (AP) Edye Smith claims she can cure drug addiction and a host of oili- er emotional problems with hyp- nosis. This week, her 12-year-old daughter was arrested on a warrant charging that she sold drugs to an undercover police- man several montTis ago. "I was said Mrs. Smith. "Why did they wait all these months? If a 12-year-old girl was selling drugs, why should Ihey wait four months lo do something about Mrs. Smith's daughter, Daphne, said the incident, oc- curred white she was al a city park distributing literature es- pousing her mother's method lor curing drug addiction. "I sold four Red se- to our friendly neighbor- hood narc (undercover narcot- ics she said in a tele- vised interview. Daphne said that was the only time she sold drugs. Her source? "A few people who came to the home (for treatment) were using drugs and were straightening she aid. Daphne conceded that it is somewhat unusual for a 12- year-old lo peddle drugs. "Bui ilien I'm not a usual 12-year-old. I've gol a brain." _ U S DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ESSA WEATHER BUREAU IWtalher Map, PS. VT-A) ABILENE AND VICINITY and warmer Thursday and Thursday nlghl. Parllv cloudy >i'H FrWaV-wMIl a high Thursday ol H a low Tnurfcy nighl near 43 a.id a Friday near 10. winds Irom soulti 10- "rlii'h 'and low lor It Picurs ending 9 lor same period lasl Deputy Joe Gee said the delay between drug purchases by un- dercover agents and arrests are commonplace. Undercover agents work in the field for several months, he explained, signing warrants against alleged drug violalors. They arc held by authorities un- til they are ready lo "blow the cover" of the agent, Gee said. Mrs. Smith said she. had worked with hundreds of young with drug 'prob- lems, some with other emotion- al problems. She said slip "explains the damage drugs can do" but uses hypnotic treatment only with Ihe permission of parents. "I don't say she (Daphne) could not have done said Mre. Smith. But she defended her daugh- ter in Juvenile Court Wednes- day as a "humanitarian." Luna 16 Returns With Moon Soil iodsv: p.m. a'm- Sunset MOSCOW (AP) The Soviet Union's Luna 16 moon-probe re- turned to earth today carrying the first samples ol moon soil ever gathered by an unmanned spacecraft, the Soviet news agency Tass reported. Helicopter-borne search learns recovered Hie capsule and its cargo on windswept steppe brushfields in Soviet Ka- zakhstan about miles soulheast of Moscow and 50 miles southeast of the Kazakh town of Tass said the craft parachut- ed to earth at a.m. EOT, six minutes later than expected. The moon material will be turned over lo Ih'c Soviel Acade- my of Sciences for analysis. The soil was gathered Sunday from Ihe Sea of Fertility, a heretofore unexplored area ol (he moon's surface. Luna 16 was launched II days ago with little fanfare and no word from the Sovicl inform- ants on the purpose of the mis- sion. Its controlled soft landing on (he moon was announced Sun- day as if it were no more signif- icant than previous Soviet soft landings that were not intended to return lo carlh. Only on Monday did Tass an- nounce that the craft would El- tempt to relurn lo carlh with a load of moon soil. Semiofficial sources say the previous Soviet moon shot, Luna 15, was an unsuccessful altempl lo bring back soil samples. NEWS INDEX Amusemcnls 8C Business Notes Bridge 2C Classified 4-7D Comics 3D Editorials 2D Horoscope............. 6C Hospital Patients...... 1 1A Obituaries 2A Spans..............9-12C To Your Good Health 6A TV Log................ 7D Women's News 2-7B Burglar Locks Himself In, Gets Caught An Abilene burglar, "working" around Thursday morning, acci- dentally locked himself in the store- room of he Key City Pawn Shop, 1157 N. 2nd, and was apprehended by police after tripping a burglar alarm. Police reports said the man had broken a skylight, dropped lo the floor and walked to an interior barred window, which he reached through and unlocked the adjoining door, response to 1he alarm, they found the building and opened a door leading into the storeroom, which contained guns and other merchandise. When officers arrived at the shop, in to the alarm, they found (he 'foiled burglar fiddling with the door, and arrested him. Capt. George Button of I e Criminal Investigation Division said charges were expected lo be filed Thursday. Scars By IlAKflY DUNPIIY Associated 1'rcss IVrllcr BEIHUT, Lebanon (AP) New fighting broke oul loclay near Amman and in northern Jordan despite another tease- fire proclamation and a Jorda- nian claim (hat a Syrian inva- sion had been repulsed. Israeli sources in Tiberias said attacks during the night by Jordanian forces in and around Irbid, Jordan's second largest city, had broken Palestinian re- sistance in Ihe northern part ol the desert kingdom. They said thai after the shell- ing ended, Jordanian troops pursued the guerrillas. One source described Hie activity as a and said Hie guer- rillas were afraid -and were giv- ing up. The main Syrian force with- drew across the border, llic in- formants said, and was cen- tered near Dcraa in southern Syria. It left behind 25 damaged or destroyed tanks and a num- ber of armored personnel ear- ners, they reported. In Iibid, 50 miles north of Am- man, the guerrillas said the fith Iloyal Artillery Battalion was firing indiscriminately at the town, "but our fighters are hold- ing fast and their morale is high." The guerrillas also said one of the unit.s raided a Jordanian post in Salt, 20 miles northwest of Amman, knocking out three machine guns. Irio Hits Bank At Rising Star RISING STAR Three Iian- dlls held up (he First Stale Rank in Rising Star about a.m. Thursday and were reported last seen heading Inward Abi- lene on Stale Hy. 36. The were .described as hping white males and two nf them hail moustaches. A bank official declined (o jiive the amount of money taken hut cnnmii'iilcd it was "not very much." No details of the rob- bery were available al press- time. Pistols were reported usrd in the, holdup. No one was reported injured. Jordanian troops claim they drove Syrian forces from the Ir- bid area Wednesday with a two pronged assault and indicted heavy casualties. (inorrilla broadcasts from Da- mascus, Die Syrian capital, said the commandos had pulled back some forces from Irbid as a tac- tical move. The guerrillas said they still dominated the city of Ramlhn, 10 miles east of Irbid. In Amman, the government radio announced that a dawn- to-dusk curfew would be lifted in different parts of Die city for fuur-hour stretches so that the International Red Cross could step up its efforts la care for the wounded. een SAN ANTONIO (AP) This city's diphlhcria epidemic is the nation's worst in 14 years and the end is not in sight, health officials say. Confirmed diphtheria cases stood at 102, with 29 more pa- licnt.s listed as "clinically con- firmed" liul unproved in labora- tory lesls. There also were six suspected cases. Tlie National Center for Dis- eases Control in Atlanta said it is the worst diphtheria epidemic in the United Stales since a De- troit outbreak in 1056, when 141 cases were recorded. Dr Marthalyn Green, head of communicable disease control here, says she sees no signs of the epidemic ending in the near future. Other local authorities have said the outbreak may last a year. emic The disease, which can dam- age the heart and'nervous sys- tem, has killed two children here this year. The mother of one of the victims said Wednesday that an autopsy showed her son's heart was so heavily damaged "it looked like a pulp." She said the boy, C, who died Aug. i, had received two shots in the diphtheria immunization series, but a cold prevented him from receiving the third inocu- lation required for full protec- tion. Children need three diphtheria shots. Anyone over .age 6 needs two. Boosters should be obtained every 10 years, or every live in epidemic situations. Despite repeated warnings, public response to a mass im- munization campaign has lagged bo' :n-i rlfirc'-s1 hopes. Burglar Can Collect By JIM Associated Press Writer DES MOINKS, Iowa (AP) The Iowa -Supremo Court hears arguments today on whether a criminal injured by a burglar trap is entitled lo collect dam- ages from the victim of his crime. Marvin Katko, 30, has admit- ted breaking into an empty farmhouse near Eddyvillc July 6, 1569. A boobytrap shotgun set by the owner, Kdward Brinoy, 53, went off and wounded Kalko in the right ankle. Katko later pleaded guilty to a charge of larceny in the night Heart-Felt Letter For Houston Police HOUSTON learned Wednesday that someone likes them. The department received a letter from Sue Dwyer and Carrie Itiddle, both 13. Addressed to "Hear It said: "Carrie and I were riding home on the school bus when a police car drove by. Iwy on our bus said, 'Here comes Ihe fuzz.' So we decided, since you have been criticized so much, it was high time you were praised. "We appreciate what you have done for us. We know you are underpaid. And if we had Ihe money we would pay each of you a million dollars a year. "But since we don'l, would yon settle for .all our love and LONDON (AP) An explo- sion ripped a hole in (he fuse- lage of an Irish airliner bound for London today. The Hoeing 707 jet carrying 122 persons made a safe emergency landing at Heathrow Airport. First reports said some of those on iKtard were injured. Airport authorities said they did not'believe Ihe blast was caused by a bomb. Crash trucks stood by as the Aer Lingits aircraft, coming in from New York via Shannon in Ireland, made ils landing. There was n hole about 3 feel by 2 feet in i he forward first-class section of Ihe fuselage. Passengers were quickly evacuated lo a terminal build- ing. "We heard a loud a passenger said. "1 was very scared. I think we were all very scared." The aircraft carried 112 pas- sengers anrl 10 crew. It was air- borne about 25 minutes from Shannon when Ihe explosion oc- curred. Police immediately surround- ed the plane after il louc-hed down shortly before noon and cordoned it off from airport workers. The copilol said: "We don'l know what caused the incident. All we heard was a loud bang. Then we suddenly had loss of pressure in Ihe aircraft." A spokesman for Acr Ijngus said: "We arc pretty sure il was not caused by explosives." An airport official said il was believed the blasl hart been caused by rapid decompression of the pressurized fuselage. Laler reports sard about 10 passengers were treated for shnck. One woman was carried from the plane on a slrolcher. anrl was fined and placed on six monlhs probation. He sued Drincy and his wife, Hcrlha, for dam- ages. An all-female Maliaska Coun- ty District Court jury awarded him half that sum lasl January. To help satisfy the judgment, 80 acres of the Briney farm wrrc auclionetl off. Sympathetic friends and neighbors bought Die land for and put it in (nisi pending the appeal by the Brincys. Tho Rrinevs contended that tl'C judgment was exces- sive and put property rights "in limbo." The Urincys1 mailbox soon be- came stuffed with letters of sympathy and money for a de- fense fund. A Gary, Ind., fireman sent S7CO he had collected to help pay for Ihe appeal. A group of Tnwa State Peni- ten'iary inmates chipped in SKO. IS'ot everyone agreed with Bri- ncy's action in rigging the boon- ylrap, and the question was of- ten asked, "What if it had been a chilil who stumbled on the old hciiFc and decided to investi- lirincy's reply has been that It-e house was boarded up so lishtly there was nn chance o[ a child gaining entrance. Only once in history has the Iowa Supreme Court ruled in a similar case. In the lB70s the ji'stirts upheld a damage award (o a firapc Ihief who had been wounded by a victim's Irapgun. Market Higher NEW YORK (AP) The stock market opened higher in moderately active trading to- day. Americans to Remove Bombers on Okinawa lidance TOKYO (AP) The Uniled States nolified the Japanese government today that il will remove B52.bombers from Oki- nawa shorlly, the Foreign Min- istry reported. Officials said the U.S. Embas- sy informed the Foreign Minis- try of Ihe decision. An embassy spokesman said U.S. officials discussed Ihe Issue at the ministry, but declined to comment on fului'e operations of the big B52 bombers in Asia. The embassy also declined (o elaborate on when the with- drawal would be completed.. Japan's Kyodo News Ssrvice reported Ihe U.S. Air Force would continue lo be permitted lo fly B52s lo Okinawa's Kadena Air Base "when such action is regarded necessary." But, nei- ther the Foreign Ministry nor the American Embassy would confirm the report fr By ELLIE HUCKER Q. I'm Interested in 'becoming a veterinarian. Could you send me some Information on the courses I have to lake, the tuition and a reliable school? I have fnur more years In high school. A. Texas A M has the only veterinary school in Texas and it's difficult to get in; about one in five are accepted. A local-veterinarian suggests you lake chemistry, zoology, botany, physics, trigonometry and Latin while you're still in high school. Now, what you'll need lo do is write Ihe School of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A M, College Station, (or 'entrance requirements and tuition. The next closest veterinary school is Oklahoma Stale University, but it accepts very few out of slate students. Let us know if you make il. Q. About a year or so ago (he R-N .Women's Section carried recipes for "Sour Dough" and hnw lo keep It In (he refrigerator. I've lost my copy of Ihe very valuable Information. Could you send me a copy? A. Thai was a scries of five articles published two years ago. II crealcd a lot .if interest al Ihe time and because of the demand for extra copies, the Il-N is completely out of some of the editions. begging and borrowing, we found the complete series and Ihe Business Manager is having the set copied for you. Your copy's in the mail. Kor others who may be interested, send .15 cents and we'll mail you a set. Your letlcr initiated the Idea, so your scl is free. Q. You've told us hnw lo run armadillos from under the house and howlo kill hull nellies, now can yon please tell me how lo kill trumpet vines? They're all over my back yard and climbing over the wood fence and buildings. A. Cut Ihe vines back to Ihe ground. Spray Ihe slump with that good olc brush killor County Agent II. C. Stanley says to really paint it on thick and you won't be seeing those Irumpcl vines anymore. Q. Abilene Is having an improvement campaign for (he business community. U'lll the Clly enter by painting (he Pcmpscy Dnnipstcrs? Maybe rrd, while and blue like posl office boxes. Also cllmlnnlc all the lettering and simply use brass plates, A. City Refuse Disposal Supt. Charles Nolcn says Ihe city is nol planning to paint the dumpslers anytime soon, but when il docs, he guarantees they won't be red, white and blue. They're painted grey because it doesn't show dirt. The lettering has to stay lo identify the dumpslers as City properly and they'll retain the "Flatten AH Boxes" sign for obvious reasons. Brass plalcs would be allraclive, but they're very expensive and if used, (rash collection rates would have to be raised which would cause a lot of you know what to lie raised by the citizens. (Roof-raising, o[ Please address questions (o Action Line, Box 30, Abilene, Texas 7560-1. Names will he not used but questions must bo signed and addresses given. Please Include telephone numbers If possible.   

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