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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - September 22, 1970, Abilene, Texas                                "WITHOUT OR WltH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT 90TH YEAR, NO. 99 PHONE 6734271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, TUESDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 22, 1970-TWENTY PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS lOc SUNDAY Auociated Pna Reported Dead In Jordanian Fighting By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Jordanian and Palestine guer- rilla forces battled in Amman and in northern Jordan today in the sixth day of a conflict that Cairo radio declared had cost lives. Syrian and Jordanian tanks slugged it out on the rocky stretches of northern Jordan in the area where Jordan has Damascus denied Syria had intervened. Syria says the tanks arc manned by Palestinian guerril- las. Arab leaders assembled in Cairo to consider methods to slop the conflict in Jordan, with some advocating military inter- vention. Middle East Map locates with bbxes U.S.'forces alerted or en route towards the eastern Mediter- because of the situation in Jordan. -Inset, at right, is map locating Jordanian villages of Irbid and -Ramtha, sites of ma- jor clashes involving Jordanians, Syrians, or Palestinian guerrilla forces. (AP Wire- photo) Tito Announces He'll Step Down BELGRADE Presi- dent Tito has announced that he will step down after ruling Yu- goslavia for 25 years and turn the country's government over to a collective leadership. Tito, 78, did not indicate Mon- day what his position-would be, but it was believed in Belgrade, the nation's capital, that he would remain head of Ihe Com- munist parly and would run Ihe new presidium, at least in its in- itial phase. Further details will be an- nounced later, Tito said. "I am quite long in this post ami I would like lo have more possibilities to work on some other he said in a speech Monday in Zagreb, the country's second largest cily. Tito, who broke from Moscow In 1048 and was named presi- dent for lite in 1963, said reorg- anization of the country's Com- munist government was neces- sary to preserve Yuguslavia's unity. He gave no timetable for the changeover. But he said speculation on who might suc- ceed him could provoke a crisis, and that to avoid it, governmen- tal restructuring was necessary. He explained that he initialed the change because "if someone else did, it would look as if they wanted to remove me." Tito said he would be replaced Market Lower NEW YOHK (AP) SlocK prices opened lower in moder- ate trading today. NEED CASH? look around Ihe house and garage for those items lhat you no longer use. Sell them In Ihe Family Week-Ender FRI.-SAT.-SUN. 3 Lines 3 Days Ho or Rafur.i 1! This Rill AooroKimaUly 15 Averoqe Wordi No Phone Orders Flcaio Only SQc Each Additional line CASH IN ADVANCE YOU SAVE ABILINE REPORTER-NEWS DEADLINE THURS. 3 P.M. by a presidium lhat would be "a form of collective president of Yugoslavia." The body would consist of representatives from the country's six republics and its main social and political or- ganizations, including the Com- munist parly. Tlio was a partisan leader against the Nazis in World War II and maintained close ties wilh the Soviet Union immedi- ately following the war. But in 1948 country became the first Soviet satellite to break away. The United Slates was pleased by the break and provided Tito's government with more than fl billion in assistance of various kinds. In later years Yugoslavia's relations wilh Moscow and Washington alter- nately warmed and cooled. Showers Dot Big Country Scattered showers doited parts of the Big Counlry Monday, and if the weatherman is right, more moisture is in store for the area Tuesday and Wednesday. Stephenville received .25 inch of rain Monday, while Dublin reported .23 De Leon had .10 and Comanche and Knox City reported a trace. The ESSA Weather Bureau at Abilene Muncipal Airport forecasts 40 per cent chance for rain Tuesday and Wednesday, with a 60 per cent chance Tuesday night. Temperatures should drop a little, too, wilh a 90 degree high Tuesday, decreasing to 65 Tuesday night and an 80 degree high Wednesday. WEATHER (Wulticr Pg. 11-A) ABILENE AND VICINITY Considerable cloudiness Balloonist Trio Believed in Sea NEW YORK U.S. Coast Guard and Canadian air force joined today in a search for three balloonisls believed down in rough Atlantic seas some 500 miles southeast of St. John's Nfld. The three, two men and a woman, Were last heard from at p.m. Monday when they radioed: "Six hundred feet and descending. Signing oil. Will try contact after landing." No further massages were received, leaving in doubt the fate of the crew which was attempting the first transatlantic crossing in a balloon. Three Coast Guard cutlers were ordered to the scene. The cutter Dallas arrived in the area at a.m. EDT and began a search. Expected later were the Duane and the Ingham. In Halifax, N.S., Canadian Air-Sea Rescue Service officials reported that a long-range patrol aircraft was being dispatched from Greenwood. The huge orange balloon, christened "the free lifted off from a Long Island cow paslure Sunday afternoon. Aboard were Rod Anderson, 32, a New York commodities broker; his wife, Pamela Brown, 28, a television actress, and Malcolm Brighton, 32, pf Farnharn, England, an aeronautical engineer. While the summit conference opening was ostensibly set for Noon EDT, it more or less be- gan at 4 a.m., EDT, with a scr- ies of private informal discus- sions among the leaders of Egypt, Sudan, Libya aiid Ku- wait, followed by a joint meet- ing with Syrian President Ncuroddin Atassi. Nasser met with the Su- danese, Libyan and Kuwaiti leaders in Suburban Kubbah Pa- lace. Later these leaders went to Obuda Palace in another part of Cairo where Alassi is slaying. Prime Minister Mohamad Daoud of Jordan attended none of the sessions, underlining Jor- dan's isolation from other Arab states in the crisis. Egypt warned against any American inteiTcntion in Jor- dan as a "hostile action against the whole Arab people." Information Minister Mo- hammed Hassanein Heikal told a news conference in Cairo that U.S. action in the midst of (he Jordanian strife would have re- percussions far beyond the Mid- dle East. "It would be a hostile act against the whole Arab people and against woild he said without elaboration. "Whatever pretext the Ameri- cans bring up for intervention in Jordan is condemned in ad- vance." Warning against any Ameri- can action in Jordan, Heikal said this could not rescue Ihe 54 of [hem U.S. citi- by Palestinian guer- rillas since multiple plane, hi- jackiiifjs Sept. 6 and Sept. 9. "Insttad.V'h'e said; ''it would only threaten their lives. It wouldj-pjisri those holding these into desperate action and nobody will be able to pro- tect Union formally ad- it opposes foreign intervention in the Jordanian conflict, informed diplomats re- ported in London. The Russians have given no clue so far thai they will press the Syrian government to obtain the withdrawal of lank and oth- er forces that have Invaded Jor- dan from Syrian territory. The informants said the So- viet attitude now is being close- ly assessed by Britain in consul- tation with Ihe United States and France. Cairo radio quoted Heikal as saying at least persona were dead in Jordan, including in refugee-crowded Wah- dat camp southeast of Amman. NEWS INDEX Amusemenls 4A Bridge................ 8B Business News 6A Classified........... 5-8B Comics 4B Editorials 8B Horoscope 2B Hospital Patj'enls 11A Obiluarres 2A Sports 10-11A To Your rkollh BB TV Log 2B Women's News.........3B Sophia and Son Italian screen star Sophia Loren proudly shows off her son, Carlo Ponti Jr., Monday as she arrives at New York's Kennedy International Airport, in her first visit to the United States since 1966. The actress came to the U.S. to at- .____tend the. premier York City of her first film made since'she. became ________a'mother. (AP Humphrey Attorney Claims He Was Stalled by Police By nOV A. JONES II Reporter-News Staff Writer Seeking to block any confession that may have been made to police, an attorney for B. C. Humphrey charged Tuesday that police refused to let him see Humphrey (or 35 minutes on the night Humphrey allegedly killed Mrs. Sandra Jean Watson. Humphrey, 45, of 1710 Chest- nut is on trial for murder with malice in the Dec. 30, 1960 shoot, ing death of Mrs. Watson at her home, 2980 S. 4th. 0. HENRY YOUNG JR. of Abilene, one of Humphrey's attorneys, the presence of Ihe six-man, six- woman Humphrey was "berserk. blabbling incoherently" when he first saw the suspect at Ihe City Jail about a.m. Dec. 31. "I couldn't get any sense out of him. He continually interrupt- ed Young said. After conferring with Hum- phrey for nearly an hour, Young said he left and returned at a.m. with a doctor to ex- amine Humphrey. "I was afraid he would hurt Young said. Young then charged that police "stalled" and refused to let him and Dr. James Casey see Humphrey until a.m. DR. CASEY TESTIFIED that Humphrey was in a "slate of marked anxiety" when he saw him. The jury had been retired afler police Capt. John Bostick began to testify of what Humphrey told him when he SEC TRIAL, Pg. 2A Cemetery Searched For Nixon's Kin By RODNEY FINDER Associated Press Wrllcr TIMAHOE, Ireland (AP) Workers today began clearing a Quaker cemclcry in Timahoe, 40 miles southwest of Dublin, where local residents say President Nixon's great- greal-grandfalher, Thomas Mil- house, is buried. The President and his wife Pat, whose maiden name was Ryan and whose relatives are believed lo live in County Tip- perary, arrive In Ireland Oct. 3 for a three-day visit. Timahoe Is on the ilinorai'y- On Monday, Irish newspaper reporters were unable to lira anybody in the (wo areas con- nected with either the Presi- dent's family or his wife's. Nonetheless, at the request of America's ambassador to Ire- land, John Moore, surveyors and landscape gardeners moved inlo the Timahoe cemetery to restore broken walls and tomb- stones and pull weeds. Parents Request AHS Air Conditioning Tuesday and Wednesday wilh scattered both days. TKe high near 90, the tow Tuesday night eS and Iht tugh Wednesday In the low Cooltr Tuesday nighr and Wednesday with a per cent ctiance ef rain both days, Increasing to per cenl Tuesday nlchl. Winds from BIB south 1S-IS m.p.h.. mitring to Iht north Tuesday night. High and lew for 24 hoyri endu-d 9 a.m.: II and 73. High and low rw uma period list yenr: 13 and 49. Sunisl last nlBhl: p.m. Sunrise- Today: a.m. Sunset Twitflhl: pm By EIXIE KUCKER Q. I'm one parent In a group of many wanting to know If there's some way we can get some action on securing full air conditioning for Abilene High? I understand It was to be completed a year ago and It Isn't yd. The students and teachers have complained with no results. What can be done? A. This is under study right row by a citizens committee. If the committee recom- mends air conditioning (and It's VERY likely that they will) then it will be submitted to the school board and it will take a bond issue to raise Ihe money for it. Several other schools will be included in Ihe recommendation junior highs (except Lincoln which is loo old, the windows would have to be changed) and some ol the elementary schools such as Fannin, Crockett and Bowie. Q. I'm cophomore at Cooper. I'm taklttg geometry ami we've teamed that (he above symbol Indicates an empty set. We were also told that the symbol Is taken from the Dailsli-Nttfreglan alphabet. The problem Is that as far as my leacher knows there Isn't a name for (his symbol. Could you please (ell mn If this symbol has a name and If so what Isll? A. There's such a letter In Ihe Danish- Norwegian alphabet. It's pronounced "uh" (gutteral But Dr. Charles Robinson head of H-SU Math Dept. doubls Ihe algebraic symbol came from there. It's printed wilh a diagonal slash to distinguish the number zero from the zero set (or emply We've polled the college math teachers and none have an official name for Ihe symbol, bul it's occasionally been called a modified zero. This symbol Is also used by the military and others to distinguish between the letter o and the number zero. Now for you who are wondering, "What Is an empty if you wrote to Action Line and asked for Ihe set of all official names for the above symbol, you would have an emply set, 'cause we didn't come up with any. Q. In regard to a question concerning o n e s h e e t air mall letters (aerogramtnes) which can be sent to anyplace In the world. Your expert was mistaken when he said you can purchase them here and mall Ihem In another country. Any aerogramme o) any country must he purchased In or Irom the country where such aerogramme Is lo be mailed. A. Our expert bows lo your superior knowledge. We had a friendly message from D.-Gainos Short, Supt. of Window Service at Ihe Post office and several others who set us straight.-Says Short, "You must use the postage of Ihe counlry from which ll's mailed, unless you mall from an APO." Mr. Short also sent us a most comforting poem to be read by people who make mistakes. Wish we could share it; unfortunately, It's unprintable! Q. Could you tell me If the "Sons of the Pioneers" still record? We've tried to gel Uiclr records anil can't find (hem. We've tried Adlcta Co. In Dallas and they senl us a list of their records, but Ignored us when we asked where to get them. II you can tell us where lo get them, I would sorely be grateful. A. The Adlcta Co. is a wholesale record distributor and not allowed to sell retail, lhal's probably why they wouldn't send you information on where lo buy them. Lloyd I'erryman, one of the "Sons of the said they've recorded one or two numbers each year; their last album, "Tumbling Tumbleweeds1.1 was recorded eight months ago. In it are three new tunes and several re-releases. If a record store doesn't have the records in slock, just ask It lo order Ihem for you. We've sent you Ihe name of a record store that will do this, Address questions to Acttea UM, Box 30, Abilene, Texas 7X14, Names will >ot be used bat questions mast be ilgned addresses given. Please kielvde telephone uunbcrs II possible.   

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