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Abilene Reporter News: Tuesday, September 15, 1970 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - September 15, 1970, Abilene, Texas                                iv EI IK "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT NO. 92 .PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, TUESDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 15, PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS lOc SUNDAY Associated Prcw Man, It's a Long Way Down! Teresa Kantian, 5, and Douglas Fels, iVz, enjoy one of the iriany rides on opening day of the West Texas Fair Monday. Teresa is the daughter of Capt. and Mrs. William R. Harman of Dyess AFB. Douglas is Ihe son of Capt. and Mrs. George Fels, also of Dyess. (Staff Photo by Don Blakley) Throng to Fair's First Day Fain officials couldn't help but .be elated by the mass of children, teen- adults and senior thronged to the opening day of (he 1970 West Texas Fair. Unofficially, 'Nib Shaw, ticket Bales chairman, estimated that persons were al the fairgrounds for. th'e first (lay of This: included pain admissions at the fairgrounds and coliseum and students. At the Coliseum, Charley Pride and others -performed to good crowds at bnth Ihe 6. p.m. and 9 p.m. shows. PRIDE WILL AGAIN perform Tuesday night at 6 p.m. and 9 p.m! In an interview Monday, Pride said that the last lime he performed in Abilene Was two years ago "and the crowd wasn't so good." He said lie was looking forward to playing at the fair. Pride is the first black to become a major figure in Ihe world of country and Western music. The North Door Singers, Alex Houston, Johnny Duncan and the Pridesmen joined Pride in Ihe excellent show. Apparently there were no calamities on the midway since Ihe .worst report were a few mosquito bites, blisters and splinters. EVEN THOUGH some items to eal had gone up, many of the prices for food were the same as the years before. All in all it was a great day for the fair and all concerned. Taylor County school chiWren had a ball on their day and there's probably many sleepy- eyed sludcnls in classes today. Cooley said Uiat Hie advance ticket office would be open each day from 9 a.m. unlil 4 p.m. Tickets may be purchased lo all shows this week at that lime. The main box office will open at p.m., according to Cooley. Arab Guerrillas Demand Israel Free 13 Hostages By THE; ASSOCIATED PRESS Arab guerrillas demanded to- day thai Israel free 13 specific prisoners and an unspecified number of Palestinians in ex- change for Americans and Is- raelis among 54 remaining air- line hijack hostages. Laying down its detailed terms for the first time, the Popular Front of the Liberation of Palestine declared; "Toslarl wilh, we wanl the Israeli gov- ernment to announce accept- ance of the principle of an ex- change." Then, a spokesman ticked off WEATHER U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ESSA WEATHER BUREAU (Weather Map, Py. >A) ABILENE AND VICINITY (M-mlle radius) Parlly clrxitfY warm Tteiday and Wednesday wilh a slight criarcc of Wednesday afternoon. The high both dayi ihotrfd be near W and Ihe Tuesday nlcM rear 75. Winds from tte swj.'fi m.p.h. Probability of rain is 20 per cenl Wednej- day- High and Tor 74 hours erding 9 d-m.: 72. and 71. and Icr period bit B5 ar.d 49. Sense I las I nigh I: p.m. SurvJst lotfay: a.m. Sunset lonfchl: p.m. Schedule TUESDAY Admitted Ly special lickcl will he students from Coleman, Santa Anna, Talpa-Conlincnlal, No- rice, Ballingcr, Miles, 'Olden, Rowcna, Holjcrl Lee, .Bronte, Swcclwnlcr, Itoscoc, Winters, Black- veil, Stamford, Lucdrn's, Highland, Ifawlcy, Jl.imlin, Winfialc, Avoca, Ari.-on, Noodle, Horn, Jinlan, Rohy, McCanllcy, Moran, Ailiany, Throck- jnorton, Sidney, Guotinc, DC Leon, Comanclic, Des- dcmona, Rising Star, Gorman, Kaslland, Cisco, Carbon, Brownv.-ood, Bangs, Brookesmilli, Zephyr. May, Blank- et, Early, Baird, Clyde, Cross Plains, Eula, Putnam and Norton. p.m. Charley Pride Johnny Duncan North Door Sinners, Alex Houston Show in Coliseum p.m. Concert liy Iliiskell Iligli School Band p.m. of Junior Polled Hereford Classes (Show Arena) p.m. Charley PrirJe Johnny Duncan North Door Singers, Alex Houston Elmer Show in Coliseum 11'00 p.m. Bill Names Carnival "Free Act" WEDNESDAY Students from Ihe following schools will be admitt- ed by special ticket: Rule, Seymour, Bocliester, Eden, I'aint Rock, .Millesvicw, Eoln, Slcrling City. I.oraine, Wcstbrook, Old Glory, Aspcnnont, Snydcr, Ira, Spur, Flnvanna, Pnllon ITcnnlciph, McAdoo, Gir.ird, Giilliric, HafkcII, Malison, Paint Creek, O'Brien, Miinday. Benjamin, Hhiurl.ind, Gorcc, Knox City, Mclvin, Brady, Hoclicllc and I.olm. a.m. Judging of Poultry Classes (Poultry Build- Judging of Junior Hereford Horned Class- es (Show Arena) a.m. Judging of Open Hereford Horned Class- es (Show Arena) p.m. Concert by Cisco High School Bnnd p.m. Blnckwood Drolhcrs Stamps Quartet Show in Coliseum p.m. Bill Ilamcs Carnival "Free Acl" a fpur.-parl demand calling for release of a Swiss man charged iri Haifa with spying (he Popular Front, two Algerians taken oil a British jetliner in Is- rael last month, 10 Lebanese soldiers taken prisoner last Jan. I and .an unspecified number of Palestinians. The spokesman, Ghassan Kanafani, said names of the Palestinians whose freedom the Popular Front seeks would be released only after Israel Bank Opens Belter Structure SANTA BARBARA, Calif. (AP) A new Bank of America branch is open in the campus community of Isla Visla lo re- place one burned by young riot- ers. In place of a prefabricated building that replaced the build- ing destroyed last spring slantls a windowlcss, concrete and steel building in Spanish ba- roque style. The red .tile roof, which cost is'slanted so that [ire- bombs would roll back on Ihe thrower's, officials say. And Ihey Say Ihe glass in Ihe front door will repel anything thrown at it- Imbedded in concrete al Ihe entrance is a plaque reading; "For social change, fair pl.iy and peace, Kevin P. Moran, April 18, 1970." Moran, a student from the University of California al San- la Barbara, was killed last April while trying to stop dissidents from burning Ihe bank. agrees lo exchange prisoners. At least 23 Americans were among the remaining hostages, but the guerrillas also hold eight Britons, eight Swiss and two West Germans. The Popular Front freed Mon- day night a Dutch crew member of a Trans Airlines Boeing 707, one of three jetli- ners blown up-in the desert Sat- urday. The guerrillas -already were demanding that Britain free Miss Leila Khaled, a commando captured in an abortive hijack attempt Sept. 6, and that Wesl (Scrmany and .Switzerland re- lease three Arab terrorists each. For. Ihe return of the Brilish hostages, the Popular Front added a second demand loday return of the body of Miss Kbaled's companion, Patrick Joseph Anguello, slain by Israe- li security agents in the altcmpl to hijack an El Al airliner on a flight from Amsterdam lo Lon- don. Kanafani reilerated that Americans were "being treated on the same basis as the Israe- lis because the U.S. government -is an enemy" and they woiild be released only when Israel ac- cepted the Popular Front's terms. NWS INDEX Arr.usemcnls ?B Bridge........... II A Business News 5H defied 7-103 Comics 66 Editorials 43 Horoscope 1 OB Hospjlal Pnlient; 3A Obituaries 2A Sports To Your Health------ I OB TV Log 1 OB Women's News......... 3B Strike Chokes Output at Both Parties Say They're Far Apart By L01VEU, McKIHGAN Associated Press Writer DETROIT (AP) The United Auto Workers went on strike against General Motors Corp. today, choking off car produc- tion by the world's Jargcsl man- ufacturing firm and idling hun- dreds of thousands of workers in the United Stales and Canada. Pickets were posted around GM facilities in 31 states and two Canadian provinces after last-minute negotiations failed to produce a new, pattern-set- ting contract for the auto indus- try. Both GM and the union said they were far apart on reaching a new contract, but pledged talks to malte the strike as short as possible. They said they would try for another meeting Wednesday, However, some union and in- dustry sources predicted the strike would be lengthy, and might exhaust the UAW's million strike fund. Union offi- cials said tlic slrike funds would last seven to eight weeks, with the workers on slrike drawing up to weekly each. The strike is the first national shutdown of GM since 1964, when failure to agree on a new -contract closed Ihc firm lor 10 da'ys- The only other major slrike against GM lasted 113 days in 1945-46. That was the longest na- tional work stoppage ever in the industry. The slrike comes just as GM is introducing its 197L models, including the subcompact Vega 2300, designed to help fight off the challenge of imported small GM's inventory of new cars is cxpecled lo last eight weeks. UAW President Leonard Woodcock severely criticized the GM contract offer and said the automaker "held out no oth- er choice" but to strike. Earl firamblett, GM vice president in charge of personnel and the firm's chief negotiator, said the UAW's action was a "slrike against reason." He de- scribed the GM contract offer as an "economic proposal that is unprecedented in our history in the size and scope of its bene- fits." Woodcock asserted that "Chrysler was lirrned away from a settlement" by "pres- sure exerted by GM." Fischer Quints Reach Age of 7 ABEflDERN, S.D. (AP) Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Fischer's quintuplets have reached the age of 7. The four girls and their broth- er atlendod school as usual Monday. If there was a celebra- tion it was held privately at home. Mr. and Mrs. Fischer try to keep the children out of the public eye. The children, born at St. lake's Hospital in 1953, are Mary Magdalene, Mary Cathe- rine, Mary Margaret, Mary Ann and James. But the UAW said Sunday Chrysler would not be an immcdiale strike largcl. Ford Motor Co. was told two ago it would nol be struck. Contracts covering v.orkers al Hie Big Three aulo- rrakcrs expired at midnight Monday. The American Motors contract expires October 16. 3 Railroads Shut Down By Pickets By NEIL GILBHIDE AP Labor Writer WASHINGTON (AP) .De- spile a federal court restraining order, union pickets shut down a mnjor portion of three railroads today while awaiting instruc- tions from their leaders. U.S. District Court Judge Howard F. Corcoran had issued the last-minulc temporary res- training order in an effort to halt the a.m. strike by four APL-C10. unions against three railroads. The chief railroad negotiator, John P. Hilz, said lhal any .strike against the Baltimore Ohio Railroad, the Chesapeake Ohio Railway and the South- ern Pacific could1 lead to an in- duslry-widc shutdown in a retal- iatory lockout. Union spokesmen said Ihey had not yet hecn officially noti- fied of the court order. A spokesman at Balti- more said all service had been stopped, including commuter lines between Baltimore and Washington. Picket lines were reported at Southern Pacific facilities at Houston, El Paso, and San Anto- nio, Tex. Pickets caiTying "on strike" signs appeared at midnight al Southern Pacific's San Francis- co headquarters and al rail yards in Los Angeles, Santa Barbara, Sacramento, Rose- vjlle, and Yuma, Ariz. Several long-distance South- ern Pacific passenger trains were reported slopped along Iheir routes and 22 trains serv- ing more than commuters on the San Francisco Peninsula were idle. Pickets also appeared at facilities in Pennsylvania, New York, Ohio, Maryland and Indi- ana, and operations al Huntinglon, W. Va. T. W: Keating, United Trans- portation Union international vice president, said he had re- ceived no official word of the court order. "As far as I'm con- cerned it's just he said. Judge Corcoran set a hearing Sept. 22 on the wage dispute in- volving some workers. Market Lower NEW YORK (AP) Slock market prices opened lower to- day in moderate trading. Trisco Contests Anti-Busing Plan SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) Gov. Ronald lieagan has signed into law a bill forbidding Ihe busing of school children, widely used (o achieve racial balance in classrooms, except wilh consent of parcnls or guardians. Approving Ihe bill Monday, Reagan said lhat "forcing chil- dren lo be herded onto buses and carled 'across town each from Iheir familiar home a vast and dehumanizing man- ipulation of school populations." Officials of three California districts with racial busing immediately said they fell the law would nol affect Iheir pro- grams because their busing was rot could get lo school by any means of travel they chose. The San Francisco school board asked the stale Supreme Court (o hold that the new law will not affect Us integrated busing plan for the Richmond and Park South districts. The American Civil Liberties Union filed a brief supporting the board's position. An ACLU attorney, Paul Halvonik, said the law Is "confusing and re- quires clarification." But he added that if ils intent is to in- terfere with desegregation, "it is obviously unconstllulional." A srfil Is before the U.S. Su- preme Courl testing Ihe consti- tutionality of a 1969 North Caro- lina law prohibiting Ihe use of stale funds to finance busing of students oulsidc (heir own dis- tricts In achieve integration. The busing issue in California came tn a head last spring when a Superior Court judge ordered the massive Los Angeles district to integrate its schools by Sept. 1, 1971. Los Angeles school officials contend they can comply wilh Judge Alfred Gitelson's order only with a busing program. San Francisco school officials claim lhat the new law, which will go Into effccl.lale In No- Gotham Gaucho Having exchanged her newly acquired crown for some southwestern headgear, Pliyl- lis George, Miss America 1971, starts off her national reign wilh a trip to New York City. !5ero, she answers questions during press conference Mon- day. The tall, former Miss Texas was chosen Miss Amer- ica Saturday night in Atlantic City, N.J. (AP Wirephoto) vember, only prohibits trans- porting students without written consent of thnir parents. The board's position is thai a sludcnl assigned lo a school nocd not use buses to get there This also is Ihe position of of- ficials in Inglewood and Pasade- na, where no problems were re- ported Monday in the firsl day o( school under a courl-ordcrcd integration program. Pasadena Supt. lUlph Horn- beck said Integration in his schools wenl "very, very smoothly." At Inglewood, public Information officer Peter Mccrs said, "We're delighted with the was things wenl." jt V..... Dy ELLIE ItUCKER Sesame Street Plea Made for Children Q. What can people do to conduct a campaign (or one of the local TV stations to carry Sesame Sticcl? Sesame Street Is exposing millions of children In beneficial learning experiences. The dlsadvantagcd clilhl Is (he major (argct and requires more help; yet (hcsc people are the ones who cannol afford Ihe TV cable service. II should be offered lo ALL children. What can we do? A. The local TV stations are well aware lhal Sesame Strcel is a very popular and beneficial program and would love lo be able to carry il; unfortunately it's available only lo educational TV channels and hasn't been released for sale lo commercial stations. Occasionally National Educational TV will release a program and it's possible that Sesame Street will be available in the future. A letter like yours to Bob Davidson, NET, 3000 Harry Hines Illvd., Dallas, Texas 7S201 just might advance the date that they release it for sale. When they do, one of the local station managers is very interested in purchasing the program. Q. I can gel six differenl answers by ashing six different window clerks al our local post ofllcc (not Abilene) questions on the cosl ol certified letter rales. What Is Ihc cheapest cosl of a certified Idler? A. It's 30 cents plus whatever the regular postage on Ihe Idler is, says Abilene Postmaster Clyde Grant. There are so many additional services lhat go along with a certified Idler, that's probably why you're getting so many different answers. Q. I read sometime ago of a doll hns- pltal In Abilene. Could you possibly print (hat Information again? I have a bisque- doll lhal needs re-slrlnging, she's (ailing apart. A. We've had lols of requests for doll repairmen, so we'll print il again. Lee Ola Schulzc at the American Heritage Museum in Old Abilene Town repairs antique dolls. Also, Fannie Mae Barnes al 1642 Grape will re-string your doll or put a new wig on it, hsit thal's (he extent of her doll repairing; she prefers dressing dolls. Both will need lo look at your doll and can give you an idea of the repair cost. Address qursllnns (o Action Line, Box 30, Abilene, Texas 79604. Names will not be used but questions must be signed and.addresses given. Please .Include. Ulcphooe numbers II   

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