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Abilene Reporter News: Monday, September 14, 1970 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - September 14, 1970, Abilene, Texas                                WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIEND5 OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, MONDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 14, PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS lOc SUNDAY Associated Preu UP) Come on, Sunshine West Texas Fair President Harvey Baker cast Iris eyes to the moisture-laden heavens Monday morning in hopes that they might begin clearing for the opening day of the huge fair. And things were looking somewhat brighter as Weather Bureau officials predicted that Monday morning's 70 per cent chance for rain would fall to 20 per cent Monday afternoon and night. (Staff photo by Don- Blakley) NE Fair Officials Act As If It Didn't Rain ill Congress, Nixon Favor 18 Voting Age Q. recently In government class, -we discussed Ihe voter age bill. Since Congress .'rejected this bill, a question came to iis, If Congress wouldn't lower the voter age, why don't llicy raise Hie draft age? A. Check back witli your government teacher. There's a misunderstanding here because Congress did pass the bill lo lower the vole rage lo 18 and the President has signed it. It's now a public law. There's some question, however, whether or not Ihe voting age can be changed without a constitutional amendment and this is being decided now by Die Supreme Court. It the court decides it's unconstitutional, the law will be declared invalid and an amendment to the Constitution will then probably be proposed. One way or another Ihe voting age seems likely to be lowered lo 18. Q. I have quite a few Hummel figurines lhat I've collected over (he years and was wondering If Ihcy arc considered anliqucs by now? A. The Hummel figurines, (which are usually small children and animals) aren't particularly rare or antiques as they're still available for sale. They were originated by Sister H. Innoccntia (born Berta Hummel) who was a Franciscan nun in Germany. She sold them to raise money for her sisterhood. Genuine Huinmels, by Sister Innocenlia, bear the signature of H. I. llnmmel. There are many imitations on Ihe market. Q. If you put a five pound fish In 10 pounds ol water, what would be the total weight? A. Fifteen pounds, The weight of. the-fish doesn't change when it's in water. Dr. Virgil Bollom, McMurry physics professor, says this problem comes up often in physics classes. He says we often confuse the lerm weight wilh the force required to lift something. Weight is the attraction, of the earth for an object. But the force required to lift an object is the difference between its weight and other buoyant forces: This principle was discovered by Archimedes about 250 B. C. Q Will you plfase explain why some of the Cily Iralllc lighls use (he yellow signal between the green and red, and others lum from green lo red without using (ho yellow. One In particular Is at S. llth and Saylcs a very busy corner and one wlierc there have been several accidents. A. Maybe we need lo have our eyes checked, but in driving by Uiat intersection we saw a light Hash on between red and green that definitely looked like amber. In an altempl lo solve the puzzle, we contacted Bud Taylor, Traffic Engineer. He said all the City traffic lights have amber following green and explained that occasionally a bulb burns out and has to be replaced. Maybe you've happened upon some inlerseclions where Ihe bulbs had burned and not been replaced yet. Address questions lo Action Line, Box 30, Abilene, Texas 7960-1. Names will not he usrrt bul questions must bo signed and addresses given. Please Include telephone If. possible By MERLE WATSON Reporter-News Staff Writer It's gone and done it on the first day of the 1070 West Texas Fair. However, wilh a hope for clearing skies, fair officials were carrying on like the rains never came. MANY ABILENE school chil- dren were making plans early this morning to attend Monday's festivities since Monday has been designated as Taylor County Day. All Abilene students will be dismissed at p.m. so they may attend Ihe Fair. Bul despite the rain which nil Sunday afternoon, midway workers and concessionaires conlinued lo set up shop for the influx of visitors expecled Monday afternoon and night. Buster Brown, midway man- ager, said "everything should be ready to go by noon Monday. Brown, who has been man- aging the midway at Abilene fairs since "back when the fair was at the old predicted that "this year's fair should be better lhan ever." NIB SHAW, veteran ticket sales chairman, said early Monday morning "just tell everybody lo come on going to be fine." Officially, the gates swung onen for Die public at 10 a.m. wilh no formal ceremony to mark the occasion. Tickets for all the shows in the Coliseum are still available, said Joe Cooley, general manager. "Our ticket box will continue lo open al 9 a.m: lo 4 p.m. for advance lickels on the west side of the coliseum each day all he said. "TICKETS FOR the per- formances will be sold at the booths from p.m. he added. Charley Pride is scheduled for two shows Monday and Tuesday night. On tap for Wednesday are the Blackwood Brolhers, Stamps Quartet and others while on Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights and Saturday afternoon will be an RCA rodeo featuring Boy Rogers and Dale Evans. 'Yes, it's fair time and all the action this week, rain or shine, will be at the 1970 West Texas Fair. Fair Schedule MONDAY p.m. Charley Pride Johnny Duncan North Dnor Singers, Alex Houston Elmer Show in Coliseum p.m. Concert by Winters High School Band p.m. Charley Pride Johnny Duncan North Door Singers, Alex Houston Elmer Show in Coliseum p.m. Bill Hames Carnival "Free Act" TUESDAY Admitted hy special ticket will be students from Coleman, Santa Anna, Jlozclle, No- vice, Ballingcr, Miles, Olden, Rowena, Hoborl Lee, Bronte, Swectwalcr, Ifoscoe, Winters, Nolan, Black- well, Stamford, Lucders, Highland, Ilawloy, Ilamlin, Wingatc, Avoca, Anson, Noodle Horn, liolan, Ttoliy, McCanlley, Hobbs, Moran, Albany, Wooclson, Throck- niorton, Gusline, De Leon, Comanche, DCS- demona, Rising Star, Gorman, Easllanil, Cisco, Carbon, BrownwoocI, Bangs, Brookcsmith, Zephyr, Slay, Blank- el, Early, Baird, Clyde, Cross Plains, Eula, Putnam and Norton. a.m. Judging ol Open Sheep Claries (Show Arena) (Wool Breeds) Judging of Junior Sheep Classes (Show Arena) (Wool Breeds) a.m. Judging of Junior Angus Classes (Show Arena) Judging of Open Angus Classes (Show Arena) p.m. Judging of Open Angora Goat Classes (Show Arena) Judging of Junior Angora Goat Classes (Show Arcnn) p.m. Charley Priile Johnny Door Alex Houston Elmer Show in Coliseum p.m. Concert hy Tlish School Banrl p.m. Judging of Junior Polled Hereford Classes (Show.Arcna) p.m. Charley Pride Johnny Duncan North Door Sinters, Alex Houston Elmer Show in Coliseum p.m. Bill Hames Carnival "Free Act" Gloomy Weather f Shades W. Texas Abilene welcomed Ihe West Texas Fair with an official 1.87 rainfall Sunday and early Monday, but up to 4.20 inches fell in Ihe Key Cily at 2101 Sylvan. Other reports around Die cily were higher than Ihe gauge at ESSA Weather Bureau at Abilene Municipal Airport, with 3.50 at 484S Stale and 2.33 al 102G Cedar. Tlie tolal rainfall [or the year is 15.88, below Ihe normal of 16.72 through Sept. 14, but there is a chance for more showers Monday and Tuesday, ac- cording to the per cent Monday and 30 per cent, Tuesday. No Classes Set During Lecture MANHATTAN, KAN. (AP) Classes al Kansas Slate Univer- sity will be dismissed from a.m. lo p.m. Wednes- day so students can hear Presi- dent Nixon deliver Ihe term's first M. Landon leclure. Doors of A lire an Field House will be opened to students, fac- ulty members and Ihcir families at 10 a.m. 90 minutes before Ihe program begins. There are more than students, and Ihe field house will seat between and 12.0DO persons, a spokesman said. Five Arrested In Huge LSD Dragnet GRAND PRAIRIE, Tex. (AP) narcotics agents said they bought LSD lab- lets for early Sunday and immediately arrested five per- sons including a 22-year-old wo- man. Tile state officers said made the buy at a home here, paying for the drugs with cash. Officers said Ihey also seized a small quantity of marijuana and barbiturates. OTHER RAINY AREAS ill the Big Country included 3.29 at Albany and 3.60 al Wylie, which fell before 10 p.m. Sunday. Receiving 2 or more inches ot rain were Hawlcy with 2.BO, Tusciila 2.25 and Mcrkol 2.10. Additional reports include Anson with 1.75, Blackwcll 1.00 wilh 1.25 recorded east of (here and Oak Creek Lake near Black- well received .83. DC gauged 1.20 and three miles soutli of Eula 1.60 was reported. HAM LIN HAD 1.46, Roby 1.55 and Sweetwaler, I'olosi and Winters had 1.00. Market Lower NEW YORK (AP) Stock market prices opened lower to- day in moderate trading. HlllilT ABILENE Municipal Airport Tolal for Year Normal lor Year 1026 Cedar 2101 Sylvan 4845 State ALBANY ANSON BAIRD BALLINGER BIG SPRI1SG BLACKWELL East of Blackwell BRECKENIUDGE CISCO CLYDE COLEMAN COLORADO CITY COMANCHE DE LEON EASTLAND EULA GOREE GORMAN HAMLIN HASKELL HAWLEY HERMLEIGH KN'OX CITY LAWN MERKEL MONDAY NOODLE PAINT HOCK POTOSI PUTNAM RANGER ROBY ROTA.N' RULE SAN ANGKLO STAMFORD STKPHKNV1LLE SWEETWATER SYLVESTER TUSCOLA WEINERT WINTERS WYLlfi The deluge which saturated Abilene Sunday afternoon, beginning about 3 p.m., stalled cars and was responsible for at least seven minor accidents. Several houses in Ihe norlli section of the cily losl power for a shorl time. A. D. Green at West Texas Utilities Co. said Ihc power failure "only lasted 11 minutes." Reports of stranded cars, often with people in them, were reported to police but no injuries occurred. A woman reported water waist-deep in the 3200 block of S. Illh about an hour during the heaviest portion of Ihe storm, SEVERAL CARS were stalled in h i g h water in' under- passes on Pine, Butternut, Cedar and Mockingbird. Water levels in Calclaw and Elm Creeks were reported lo be near flooding late Sunday night, but Monday morning Cily' Water Supl. Bill Wccms said the creeks liart subsided and would not threaten again unless there Is a. big rain Monday. According lo Ihe weather bureau, the rain lias been attrib- ulcd lo the cold front and remains of Hurricane Ella, al- though there is probably good argument thai the Wcsl Texas Fair was responsible. Israelis Warn Guerrillas Against Harming Hostages By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Israel has warned Palestinian guerrillas it will impose the death penally on 450 sympathiz- ers rounded up in occupied Arab territories if Ihe remaining hi- jack hostages in Jordan arc harmed, an Arab emissary dis- closed today. Dr. Qanihawi of Nablus in Israeli-held Jordan said he carried the warning lo Amman over Hie weekend at the behest of Ihe Jerusalem government. He said the Israelis also threat- ened lo blow 'up houses of guer- rillas convicted by Israeli courts and to confiscate their property. A known sympathizer ol the Popular Front for (he Libera- tion of Palestine, which is hold- ing the hostages, the Nablus doctor was one of three Arab emissaries dispatched lo Jordan by Ihe Israelis. Afler the three arrived in Am- man, the Israelis disclosed they had rounded up 4aO Arabs in Jordan's occupied west bank and in Ihe Gaza Strip. The Popular front said Sun- day it would retaliate for the mass arrcsls "with complete ruthlessness." The guerrilla leadership re- vised ils figure today on the number of remaining hostages lo "about 50" afler airline offi- cials rcporlcd 55 persons still unaccounted lor. The Popular Front had claimed Saturday it retained only 40 captives. The last of the other 257 hosl- ages, held for as long as a week, reached Nicosia Sunday. Many then left lor Zurich anil London, while olhers spent their first night of freedom in Cyprus. They were passengers in .1 Swissair DCB and a Trans World Airlines Boeing 707 Hint Ihe Popular Front hijacked Sepl. 6 and a BOAC VCin com- mandeered last Wednesday. The commandos had demanded the release of seven Arab prisoners of Britain. Wcsl Germany and Switzerland as Ihe price of their hostages' freedom. However, Ihe, seven remained imprisoned and a Popular Front statement Sunday night did not spell out Icrms for the release of (he remaining hostages. H said Hie demands have been com- municated to the governments involved. The statement telephoned lo news agencies in Beirul said, "The PFLP has made these as ils final demands and will settle for nothing short of the uncon- dilional surrender to them by all governments concerned." Negotiations between the Palestinians and a committee of the International lied Cross were suspended Sunday and the Red Cross negotiators flew back to Geneva. Officials of Ihe Red Cross and the Swiss government met for more than three hours today with the four-nation hijack crisis committee. The Swiss Foreign Ministry then announced lhal Monday 1.87 15.68 16.72 2.33 4.20 3.50 3.29 1.75 .50 .45 .39 1.00 1.25 .31 .60 .60 .40 .74 .55 1.20 .65 1.60 .80 .50 1.46 -74 2.00 .50 .83 .54 2.11 .36 .50 .60 1.00 .50 .70 1.55 .95 .90 1.12 .83 .54 1.00 .72 2.25 .70 1.00 3.60 Abilene Lakes Gain 495 Million Gallons Abilene's three lakes gained 495 million gallons by B a.m. Monday, approximately what Ihe city uses in 35 days, Water Supt. Bill Weems said. Wecms said thai Lake Abilene was up .1 foot Monday at 8 a.m., WEATHER U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ESSA WEATHER BUREAU (Wtlller Map, Pg. <-A) ABILENE AMD VICINITY (0-rrlle wilh showers Monday mcrring with partly cloudy and MM-.day and n'flhl. Scattered High Monday ahoutd be 90. the Monday nlQM rear 70 and the hioh Tuesday In Ih; mid 6-ls. Wtndi from the south 10-15 m.p h. Probability c( rain 73 cent Ifjytw morning, 20 per cent MwxJa-y alterrcon aril n'gr.1 and cent Tueiday. High and lor 74 hoyrs end ng f a.rn.i Ar.d 71. High and fzr period lail Yter: S3 and frl. Suniet last nighr: 7H3 p.m. S'.r.riis A.m. Sursei IwigM: P.m. a gain of some :iO million gallons of water. Lake Fort Phantom Hill was up 3 fool for a 450 million gal- lon Rain, Wecms said. Lake Kirby was up .1 fool, for a 30 million gallon gain. Wecms said he did nol expect creeks lo rise, unless of course more rain falls, because "Ihe biggcsl rain fell in town. Not as much fell al the heads of our creeks." Spillway levels at 8 a.m. were: Phantom, Ihree fctl below; Abilene, feel below; Kirby, 2.4 feet bclow. Weems said, "This puls our lakes in good shape." Weems added that Ihe Lakes have a total of 22.8 billion of gallons of water now, with 10.2 billion in Phantom, and 1.8 billion each in Kirby and Abilene. the organization had a mandate to work for release of all Ihe hostages. With the absence from Am- man of the Red Cross team, Valican emissary Msgr. Jean llhodain, met lor 30 minutes wilh lop Popular Front leaders and said the talks were "very encouraging." Procaccino Backs Rocky NEW YORK (AP) Mario Procaccino, a lifelong Democrat who was defeated when he ran for mayor last year, en- dorsed Republican Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller for re-elccllon to- day. Procaccino said he was organ- izing an Independent committee to back Rockefeller and "pre- serve Ihe political position of the moderate oriented voter.'1 He referred lo the Democratic candidate, Arthur J. Goldberg, as "an import from Chicago" and "the great liberal from Chi- cago." Procaccino's unsuccessful run was marked by a number of de- fect ions by Democrats lo the banner ot Mayor John V. Lind- say, who was re-elected on the Liberal parly and independent lines. Goldberg supported Lind- say. Al a news conference, Procac- cino also voiced support of Lt. Gov. Malcolm Wilson and Re- publican Ally Gen. Louis J. Ufkowitz, but endorsed the Democratic slale comptroller, Arthur Levitt. Rockefeller, Procaccino laid, is "a real pro wilh a record of solid achievement. He has per- formed well and has provided real substance in Ihe form of en- lighlcncd and efficient govern- ment." He called on voters to "reject I hose who stabbed the Demo- cratic party in the back.'' NEWS INDEX Amusements I2B Bridge ................43 Classified.......... 9-12B Ccmics.............. 8B Horoscope............ 1OA HosDiiol Potienis........6A Obituaries.............2A Siwrts 12-14A To Ycur Good Health___6B TV 76. 38 How Does the Criminal Pick His Pri-a crime specialist Rernnnl Gauzer reveals secrets of pro- Jcssionnl in giving no-non- sense guidelines on how to avoid be- ing a statistic in the spiraling inci-' nVnce of crime. I7i.< ten'piirt series tilled "On Guard, Protect Yourself Afiiinit The Criminal" starts on Pg. 211 in this newspaper today. A 64 pngc illustrated booklet, ivitli added ma- terial is alto available. Order it today through, this newspaper. Only J   

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