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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: September 11, 1970 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - September 11, 1970, Abilene, Texas                                gtottene potter "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT 90TH YEAR, NO. 87 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, FRIDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 11, PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS lOc SUNDAY Auociqted Prcu Hurricane Ella Aims at S. Texas BY GARY GARRISON Associated 1'rcss Writer BROWNSVILLE, Tex. (AP) Hurricane Blla, Us winds a severe 85 miles per hour, raced toward [he Texas-Mexico coast today and residents quickly took action lo counter the probable damage and danger. The Weather Bureau forecast that Klla would hit near or a lillle south of Brownsville, a city of cm the Mexican border i8 miles from the Gulf of Mex- ico. The hurricane speeded up during the night, moving at 20 m.p.h. about 200 miles east southeast ol Brownsville. Thurs- day it was moving at 10 m.p.h.. after crossing the lip of Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. Predicted rains of six inches probably would cause flooding. Tides of S to 8 feet were ex- pected in the Brownsville area and at Port Isabel, a Inwn of on the shore northeast of. Brownsville. Evacuation of low areas began by dawn and a Cameron County (Brownsville) sheriff's spokes- man said .South Padre Island and Port Isabel were due lo be empty of people by noon. The need (or protection was Hijackers Shun Bid To Transfers Hostages By THE ASSOCIATED PRKSS Moderate Palestinian leaders and the Jordanian government tried (oday to move more than 280 hostages from hijacked planes in, the Jordanian desert where a dust storm blew up. But hijackers holding the pas- sengers; crewmen and three air- liners balked. Told of the effort to move the passengers, one guerrilla said: "Then why the hell have we been waiting here all these days. I tell you nobody is going to move from here until our demands are met." The development came after four Western governments and Israel rejected a guerrilla at- tempt to trade Israeli passen- gers for Arabs held by Israel. They demanded that all host- ages be freed. The leftist Arab government of Iraqi and Syria further isolat- ed the Peking-oriented guerril- Robbery Suspects Held in Monahans Three' men, armed with sawed-off sholgun, suspects in an armed robbery here Thurs- day night, were apprehended Friday morning two miles west "of Pecos by Pecos-based High- way Patrolmen Warren Nult and David Burns. Johnny Jones, 30, of Tampa, Fla Calvin Thomas, 25, of MiniaV, Fla., and Robert Wright, 21, of Tampa were charged with armed robbery by Monahans Justice of the Peace Bill Reagan in connection with the armed robbery of the Colonial Inn Motel at Monahans of Bond was set at each. Tne three suspects are cx- necled to be charged wilh the Wednesday night robbery cf The American Motor Inn in Abilene where was taken at gunpoint in that robbery. Monahans Police Chief Bob Patterson said Ihe three men were driving a stolen, 1971 4- door sedan. He expects Georgia authorities will file charges of grand theft-auto, and federal authorities will file charges for interslale transportation of a stolen vehicle. Patterson said they would also probably- be charged for possession of an illegal firearm, the sawed off sholgun. The three men will be held In Monahans pending bond or indictment. Hell Loses In Population HELL, Mich. (AP) Because of Hell's Bells, the population of Hell declined in the 1970 census. The census showed that the southeastern Michigan commu- nity's population dipped from 52 to 43. The Hell Chamber of Commerce said it was due largely to the drafting of broth- ers George and Charles Bell into military service. The chamber said Hie two were not counted in Ihe census, and added the village "is proud of its contribution to Ihe armed forces, but like most everyone, we will be happy when Hell's Bells are back in Hell, Mich." iWSlNDEX K G. Kelly, on duly at the inn, said one of the men told him "Ihis is a holdup. Gel behind the counter." The man found Kelly's hands and feet wilh tape and also taped up Mrs. Huth Anderson, another clerk. After the men left in a late- model car, Kelly freed himself and called H. L. Carmack, man- ager of the inn. Kelly then notified police. He said no shots were fired. las by coming out-in favor of Ihe release of all planes and passen- gers. It was unclear whether the at- titude of guerrillas at the .icene reflected the views of the lead- ership of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine, which claim credit for five hi- jacking plols this week. The Palestine Liberation Or- ganization's Cenlral Committee, the over'all command of Ihe Arab guerrilla movement, had announced the hostages would be moved lo Amman for human- itarian reasons and would re- main there until their fate was decided. Andre Rochal, Ihe Interna- tional Hed Cross representative who has been negotiating for Ihe hostages' release, said all of them would be brought to the Jordanian capital. In Geneva, Marcel Naville, president of the International Red Cross Committee, said he understood an agreement for the release of the passengers and crewmen had been reached with the Palestinians. At the desert airstrip whore Ihe hostages were held, Ihe commando guards appeared as lired as Iheir captives after five days and nights in the open. given emphasis by Hurricane Celia which struck the Corpus Chrisli area. 150 miles lo Ihe north Aug. 3 wilh at least 13 persons killed in Texas. Also of painful memory was Hurricane Beulah of 1967 in which the death loll was also 13. Boulah struck in about the same area at which Klla pointed. The Fury of- Ihe hurricane was predicted lo reach as far north as Port Aransas, 150 miles north of Brownsville where tides were expected to be 2 to 5 feet above normal. Port Aransas was al- most destroyed by Hurricane Celia. Residents of the Lower Rio Grande Valley from Brownsville north were profiling by Ihe ex- periences of Celia. They were buying extra gasoline, boarding UP some windows and taping others. Food stores opened early 2nd residents began stocking up. The Red Cross established a refugee center by 9 a.m. Govern- ment disaster centers began operation. National were lold lo keep in touch wilh their headquarters. Spanish language radio sta- tions warned residents across the Rio Grande in Mexico of Ihe storm danger. All the rest of Ihe Texas coast- line remained under a hurricane watch, ordered hours earlier while Ella was still about 500 miles offshore. Highest winds near the center of.Ella, the season's fifth such tropical storm; were estimated at 85 miles per hour. The Weather Bureau predicled a gradual increase in size and wind force of the new and com- paratively small hurricane as it churned toward the west-north- west at about 20 miles per hour. Ella formed only Thursday off Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula and thrashed steadily toward land. Its indicated course posed a threat to a part of the Lower liio Grande Valley devastated as Hurricane Beulah roared inland Sept. 20, 1967, likewise claiming 13 lives in Texas and setting off floods which lasted for days. Agents to Ride Shotgun On U.S. Overseas Flights By VERN HAUGLAM) AP Aviation Writer WASHINGTON (AP) Armed federal agents will ride shotgun on overseas flights of. two U.S. airlines in'an'attempt to foil hijacking attempts, an in- formed source disclosed today. Treasury agents and Federal Aviation Administration mar- shals will be assigned to trans- atlantic and European flights of Trans World Airlines and Pan American World Airways, the source said. The sky marshals currently arc undergoing training and will board flights Saturday, the source added. Pan Am and TWA are Ihe only scheduled American carriers flying across the Atlantic and throughout Eu- rope. The airlines and government agencies declined to confirm or deny the report. All reportedly have agreed to remain silent un- til Ihe While House announces measures designed lo thwart hi- jackings and aircraft sabotage. "The situation is very delicate and everyone is anxious not to upset any arrangements that are one official said. A Pentagon spokesman said Thursday the Defense Depart- ment is prepared lo provide mil- itary guards or train personnel for sky marshal duty if request- ed by the airlines. Pilols in the past have op- posed sky marshals. Picketers in Melee A marl struggles with police as Mexican- American. pickcters and police clashed Thursday in a disturbance arising from the picketing of. San, Antonio Mayor W. W. McAllister's businessJ office. This scene was at a bank near the mayor's firm, where tne clashes occurred after pickelers1 chased a man following an incident in the picket line. (AP Wirepholo) "We haven't much desire lo see armed guards on our a spokesman for the pi- lots declared. "We don't like siioot-ouls at feel." Another aviation veteran said there would be litlie danger from rapid decompression of a jetliner if a bullet pierced the fuselage or shattered a window. "Most pilots would not worry about rapid the source said. If the aircraft was cruising at .Ti.OOO feel, he explained, it would Lake less than four min- utes lo drop to feel, an ?l- titude at which everyone could breathe normally without the use of emergency oxygen masks carried aboard all commercial jets. Shouting Convict Foils Hearing SAN QUKNTIN, Calif. (AP) Rnchcll Magee, a supervisor of the Aug. 7 escape atlempt [hat ended with the death of four persons outside a San .Rafael courthouse, was dragged into a makeshift courtroom in San Qucnlin Prison Thursday in an unsuc- cessful attempt lo arraign him on murder charges. Handcuffed and shackled, the 31-year-old convict shouted "Power lo the people; death lo the as guards deposited him, feel dragging, before Superior Court Judge E. Warren McRuire. "Power lo Ihe people, death to the responded an audience of some 50 young people, mostly while, who had passed metal detectors at the gale in order lo attend Ihe session. Magcc is charged with the murder of Superior Court Judge Harold Haley, who was taken hostage and died with two con- victs, and a sympathizer who tried to free them in Ihe shoot-out at the. Marin County Courthouse in San Rafael. Since Ihcn, hearings involving San Quentin inmates charged wilh in-prison crimes have bcon held in a staff training building here at the prison, lo Ihe protests of the inmates and their sympathizers. Magee was in Ihe San liafael courtroom as a wilness during Ihe hearing thai was disrupled by the breakout attempt. He was wounded in the atlempt. Magee is serving a life scnlence for k'dnaping and robbery and now is charged both with Ihe murder of Haley and with assault on Ihe judge. Both charges carry the death penalty on conviction for a person already serving life. As Hie atlempl to arraign him proceeded, Magee repeatedly internipled. Jury to Investigate San Antonio Clash SAN ANTONIO (AP) The Bexar County Grand Jury was lo convene today lo investigate a disturbance in which Mexican- American pickelers and police clashed in a second day of dem- onstrations against Mayor W.W. McAllister. Ten persons were arrested Thursday after pickelers and police exchanged blows in Ihe downtown area. Twenty-nine, pickelers were arrested. Wednesday in the first, day of sleppcd-up activities lo protest the 81-year-old mayor's televised remarks aboul Mexi- can-Americans. There was no violence Wednesday. Two persons were booked for aggravated assault on a police officer Thursday. The others were booked on such complaints as disorderly conduct. Several policemen said they were atlackcd by Ihe crowd, while al leasl two immcn charged police officers either slapped or pushed them. leaders of the demonstration said they would continue to pick- et a savings firm where Mayor McAllister is board chairman. One leader said Ihey will picket until he "resigns and leaves lown." The mayor has been under at- tack since July, when he said in an interview on NBC tele- vision that Mexican-Americans are perhaps not quite as "am- NE Fish Off Kirby, Dam, But Watch Parking Amuseme nts H, 1 5B Classified 8-HB Comics Editorials Horoscope 8A Hospital Potienis........3D Obituaries 2A CpcflS 10-1 2A To Your Good Health------SA Log Women's News By ELLIE HUCKEfl Q. Why are there "No Trespassing" signs all Dp and down the dam at Lake Klrby, meaning one cannot fish off the dam? My partner and 1 fished off (hat dam for over 20 years and It's about the only place (a fish since Ihe bushes and trees have been allowed to flourish on the east hanks. Is Ihis a ruling by Ifie commission or one made by IKe lake keeper? Since we have lo pay (o fish In that lake, seems one should be allowed to llsn wherever he wishes. A. Fish to your heart's content off the Kirby dam, just don't park your car there. Action Line couldn't find any "No Trespassing" signs inside the lake 'area. There's a sign on Ihe dam lhal says, "No Parking on Ihe it was put there by Bill Wecms, City Water and Sewer director, purely for safety reasons. A few people were parking their cars In such fyway that other cars couldn't pass, so in order to prevent someone driving off Ihe dam, the "No Parking on Dam" sign was erected. Park your car al either end of the dam. Q. I will be a freshman at Angelo Stale In [lie fall and have always been Inlerested In going abroad to slurly, perhaps lo Scotland. Could you tell me some persons or organizations who would be interested hi sponsoring such an exchange program? A. First write the St. Andrews Society of the Slate of New York, 281 Park Ave., N.Y., N. Y., 10010. It's a society of Scottish descendants' who offer scholarships tn promote Scotland. They offer graduate scholarships, but may know of under- graduate scholarships also, Then write Ihe Institute of International Education, 809 United Nations Plaza, N. Y., N. Y. 10017. This is a government agency lhat handles government and private scholarships; it coordinates International education programs. Don't want lo discourage you, bill because o( the tight money situation, many scholar- ships have been cut sliffcr lhan usual. and competition is Q. I've noticed lately lhal some city po- lice do not obey "normal" traffic laws such, as speed zones, slop signs, and somedmes even traffic lights. Are police cars exempt from thess laws al all times or are they supposed (o obey them If they don't have their lights or sirens turned on? I recently saw a police car almost ran a car off the road and (hen run a red light. i A. The police cars have numbers and license plates. II you could give. more detailed information on the incident you witnessed, such as when, where and the car number, Police Chfef Dodson will check it out. Under normal circumstances, the policemen are supposed to abide by all the laws. Q, Our City wafer bills were Increased la Octtber 1964. Mr. Clifton said this lacrusc would amount (o abort per year which would be used lo finance a new million treatment plant about miles northeast of Abilene. Ilnw much money has (his Increase brought Into the City? Has (he new treatment plant been started or built? If not, what has been done with Ihe money? A. The treatment plant is under construc- tion now and is scheduled for completion in November. A pumping station was built on Ihe Clear Fork of the Brazos with this same money. Enact figures arc not available as lo how much Ihe increase has brought in. City Auditor Marshall Bromley estimates it to be per year, but cautions this is not accurate and exact figures won't be available until the audit in February. Bill Weems, City Water and Sewer director, says for us not to worry, they've done wilh the money cxaclly what they said they'd do. Address to Action Line, Box 30, Ahllene. Texas 75604. Names will not be used but questions must he signed and addresses gives. Pleace Include telephone numbers K possible. biliously motivated as the anglos are lo gel ahead financially." No serious injuries were re- ported Thursday. Among those arrested was county commissioner Albert Pena Jr., founder or co-founder of several Mexican-American organizations. Pena also was ar- resled Wednesday. Police said Ihey-arrested him Thursday tor refusing to leave a restricted area in the jail. Pena said he went there to make sure Jhc police "didJi'l push these pcripie around any more.'-' The skirmishes with police erupted afler more than 80 per- sons, some of them businessmen, picketed the mayor's savings firm for more lhan an hour. A woman picketer said a man jostled her antl threw her against a wall. The man was identified by police as Randy Nugent, fromer county district attorney chief in- vesligalnr. Officers said he de- nied the claims. Nugent tolrl police he was chased to a bank near the sav- ings firm. Police said Ihey found him in. an elevalor surrounded by several pickelers. The melee, broke out when Capl. L-G. Dunaway ordered Nugenl taken Ip the police sta- tion. Dunaway said the crowd apparently thought Ihe police were going lo let Nugent go, and "Ihey got excited." Earlier Thursday, al Ihe regu- lar cily council session, Mayor McAllister came under fire from several quarters. He has maintained NBC took his remarks out of context, but Mexican-American Councilman Pete Torres read him a letter from NBC Thursday, categori- cally denying Ihe mayor's claims. McAllister stuck to his posi- tion. "I make no retractions for my remarks, he said. Market Lower NEW YORK (AP) Stock market prices opened lower to- day in moderate irading. WEATHER U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ESSn WEATHER BUREAU (Weamir Map, H. ABILENE AND VICINITY Fair and cuol Friday with Increajlno cloodlneil and a poiiiblllty ef Mattered showeri. The high Friday ihould be about 13, the low Friday mar U, tnl lti> hklh Saturday near wiMi from the S-15 m.p.h, o( rabi li 10 per unf Friday nioht arp 30 ptr cent Saturday. High tnd taw (or hours ending a.m.: and HlqK and bn for lami period lait year: a trA U. Suniil Hil c.m. SUIVIM loday: a.m. p m. A   

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