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Abilene Reporter News: Monday, August 31, 1970 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - August 31, 1970, Abilene, Texas                                ..'Co .-.CO "WITHOUT OR'WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT V) to V-1 CD llmlmllfi LiilUJ I UUlllullUUlolUiUUlUluuBBUwlBlUulQUualllUJlllUflUUUIUJU OQTH YEAR; PHONE ABILENE, EVENING, AUGUST 31, PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS lOc SUNDAY Associated Prea (ff) c By ELLIE.RUCKER Does Daylight Savings Change Date of Birth? Q. If a baby Is barn between 12 and 1 .p.m. daylight time, Isn'l Its birthday actually (he day before? .A. It's an Interesting'thought and it you to believe that, unofficially, I guess it's okay, but legally a "child's birthday is determined according to the standard time in.effect at the time .the birth occurs. The Unjfbniy Time Act of 1966-.'provides that daylight tinie Shalt be the standard lime during the period it's in effect and determines the hour and day of birth to be entered on birth certificates. ,Q. If Charley Pride was unable to he at the West Texas Fnlr, would our money be refunded'.' What tloesMt tost for a two-year-old to see his show at the .coliseum? A. The tickets are marked "No Refund or and the only reason Charley Pride would nol appear would be in case of illness. If this happened, anolher'star of his equal or as near his equal as possible would be' brought in. Also, Charley Pride is only n part of the show; other well-known stars will appear with him, says Harvey Baker, Fair President. There's no charge for a 2-year-old child if he doesn't occupy a coliseum seat, but if you want a scat for your child, then you'll be charged the regular price. Q. I am Interested In locating a person In (his area who Is giltcd with the ability fo "water wllth" (or the location of .underground water sources. I hnvc a .friend who lias a small farm in this area who wanls to drill a water well but Is 'reluctant to spend the time and money doing this unless good water couid be located. Can you.help? AY! Can we help! As a result of researching your question. Action Line now has what must be the most complete list of water witches in existence. Red Prince, Reporter- Ngjys .pressman, has to help your frionrt find.water and he won'l even charge for his services, lie said the secret is that you'-must-believe it will work. Also, you must have the right limb and it so happens that he has a tree with the right limb it's a green limb from a peach tree. He's found wafer for several others, he says. We've sent you his home phone number. Q. I haven't seen anything In the paper ahoul Rap Brown for quite some time. What has happened (o him and do the authorities know where he Is? A. If they do, they're not telling. He's still one of the top 10 fugitives wanted by the FBI, has the distinction of being the only, person ever to be made the llth most wanted man on the FBI's list of 10 most wanled. Since Edmund Devlin was caught, Brown has moved up to 10th spot.' The Negro militant was last reported seen by his wife in New York March when he Jcfl for a Bel Air, Mainland, court appearance. He's wanted for interstate flight, arson, inciting to riot and failure to app.ear. .Q. What is the name for people, born .bptween two signs of the zodiac? For Instance, sometimes the ISIh of January It completely left out of the readings. I can't remember the name of these .people. A. The division line between signs is called the cusp; this may be what you're referring to. Louise Green, astrologer, explains that everyone is born under some sign; no one is born between signs. Some people born on Jan. 19 are under Capricorn, others are under Aquarius. It depends on what year, what hour and in what part of the country you were born.The only way to determine exactly what sign you fall under is to have an astrologer set up your own personal chart. Address questions (o Action IJne, Box no, Abilene, Texas 79604. Names will not be used but questions must be signed ami addresses given. Please Include telephone numbers If possible. FLAME-THROWER AT WORK A tank-mounted name-thrower, nicknamed "Zippo" by .soldiers, fires a stream of napalm at foliage during patrol along southern edge of the DMZ in South Vietnam. Soldiers are members of the U.S. 5lji Mechanized Division. The flame-thrower is used-to possible enemy hiding places. (AP Wirepholo) Million Damage Seen In Los Angeles Rioting By BILLKOSMAN Associated Tress Writer LOS ANGELES (AP) The first full-scale riot in this city since the Walts holocaust of 1965 has left one person dead, more lhan 60 injured, 185 jailed and -178 businesses vandalized or looted. Property damage estimates range up to million. Authorities and spokesmen for the peaceful Mexican-American antiwar parade and rally thai preceded the violence Saturday disagreed on how and why the trouble started. Chanting "Chicano power" and "Viva la Ilaza" (long live the a cheerful crowd variously estimated at lo had marched three miles Market Higher NEW YORK (AP) The stock market opened higher to- day in moderately active trad- ing. on a hot afternoon through East Angelca, a rundown com- munity where one million Mexi- can-Americans live. Mexican-Americans had come .from many states to protest the 'war and make public Iheir that proportionately more Chicanes die in Vietnam than members of other groups, spokesmen said. Trouble erupted Sunday night in the Wilmington section, 20 miles soulh of downtown Los Angeles. Police said about 500 Mexican American neighbor- several fires in a 12-block pitched rocks and hurled bol- llcs. Some arersts were made. At Riverside, 65 miles soulh- east of Los Angeles, four police- men were shot Sunday night in an ambush during a search of a hood for persons suspected for throwing firebombs earlier in the day. None of the officers was seriously injured, authori- ties said. Police said Ihey did not know why a group of Mexican-Ameri- can youths began throwing fire- bombs and rocks in a city park. Four persons were arrested but none-was charged in the shoot- ings, officers added. The violence Saturday in East Los Angeles began suddenly. Sheriff's deputies said youlhs threw rocks and bottles at them when they arrived at a crowded liquor store to check a report of looting. Soon police used tear gas.________________________ WEATHER U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ESSA WEATHER BUREAU IWeJlhErMaj, Pg. IS-A) ABILENE AND VICINITY radius} Partly cloudy Morday and Tuesday a chance of thovten. The boJh days near 90 and a low Monday right netr 70. Protoabilily of ra'ui 35 per cent VwKJav, 20 per cent nighT. High and for ?J hours ending 9 am.: G9 and (A. High and (x same period last year; 63 and 71. Sun let I all r.'ghl: p.m. Sunrise today: a.m. Sunscl pm. Troops End Viet Doctors Siege By RICHARD Associated Press Writer NHA TRANG, Vietnam (AP) A armed siege of a ...Vietnamese military hospital by an army doctor accused of kill- ing a hospital administrator was "ended today by four armored .vehicles and troops that blasted holes in the hospital compound. .South Violnamcsc military -headquarters said Capt. Ha Thuc Nhan, 35, the hospital's eye, ear, nose and throat spcci- -nlist, mortally wounded himself '-'with a shot in the head. But wit- .'riesses who saw the surgeon .said it wrs more likely Ihe falal bullet was fired from outside Ihe .compound, C At least three other persons- including an American Army bus driver caught by accident in a volley of fire dead as a result of the bizarre siege; Unconfirmed reports said that as many as 10 Vietnamese, mostly civilians, had been killed or wounded since the doctor barricaded himself in the hospi- tal last Wednesday. South Victnamisc headquar- ters in Saigon confirmed only that two Vietnamese civilians were killed in the Shootout. Informants here said Nhan's action apparently was toucher! off by his anger at being ac- cused of having shot and killed Maj. Tran Van Hicn, director of (he Nguyen Hue military hospi- tal here. The major's botiy was washed up on a Nha Trang beach last Wednesday. Nhan's alleged motive for kill- ing Hien was that the major was Ihe informants .said, asserting that Hicn had sold rice rations intended for Ihe hospital's 700 patients lor personal profit. Nhan, who was popular among other staff doctors and patients, resisted military police who sought to arrest him on Wednes- day, the informants said. Mian disarmed two policemen and took their gims, then rallied a number of wounded hospital patients lo begin the siege, Uro sources added. From Wednes- day night, until this morning, Nhan and his haps 25 in all, many of them armed with carbines and other all at- tempts by authorities to dis- lodge them from the hospital compound near downtown Nha Trang. Passers-by were fired on, Vietnamese officers said, as they drove past the hospital gate. Some of the armed pa- licr.ts fired from behind trees and cement walls along a road leading to a major street. Most of the hospilal's patients See DOCTOR, Pg. 2A Firm on Claim Against Egypt TEL' AVIV (AP) Prime Minister: Golda Melr said today Israel'Is engaged in uous-dispute" with the'. United 'Stale's over Israeli charges of Egyptian violations of Ihe Mid- dle East cease-fire along the Suez Canal. "As initiator of the proposal, the United Stales promised that neither side would be allowed to improve Its position through the she told a meeting of the HisUdrul, Israel's labor federation. "Only a few hours passed (sftcr the shooting halt look ef- -fcct Aug. 7) and already the Egyptians began violating the agreement, and Ihese violations are still sire said. "'Israel cannot concede on this Philadelphia Police Raids Draw Gunfire PHILADELPHIA other policeman was shot today, Ihe fifth in 36 hours with one of them dead, as officers in post- dawn raids exchanged gunfire with barricaded occupants of three buildings alleged to be headquarters of black militants. At least 14 men and women were arrested. The latest victim was hit In the leg when officers crashed through the door of a Black Panther Community Informa- tion Center located in the heart of North Philadelphia's ghetto, near the site of the 1964 street rioling. Inspector James Curran, lead- ing one. raiding team, said he pounded on the door, advised thai police officers were outside with'a warrant and demanded Immediate 'surrender. '.'We heard a scuffle and then a shotgun Curran said. "We knocked in a door and more shots were exchanged." Patrolman Frank Eckman was struck in the shooting and Curran told newsman lhal he and Capl. Robert Martin "re- ceived gunshot pellets in the face." No' one was injured in the raids at the other two places. On Saturday night a Fair- mount Park Guard was shot to death, and anolher wounded, in an atlat'k Police Commissioner Frank Rizzo called Ihe work of a band of revolutionaries. On Sunday night two highway palrolmcn were .wounded criti- cally just a.few blocks from the first west Philadelphia shooting they stopped a'n auto in slolcn car '-hnck. One of those hurt was Patrolman Thomas Gibbons, Jr., whose father was tile city's police commissioner from 1952 to 1960. The other was Patrolman James Nolan. Rizzo said he didn't believe the Saturday and Sunday night shootings were connected. Police have arrested three self-styled "revolutionaries" for the Saturday shootings, and are seeking three others. Rizzo called that incident an organ- ized act of violence by militants who had "set out fo, as they say, kill pigs." Rizzo said the conspirators had plotted to blow up a police station in West Philadelphia, not loo far from the University of Pennsylvania, with hand gre- nades allegedly stolen last year from the Army at Ft. Dix, N.J. Instead, he said, they switched the plans lo attack Ihe guard house near Cobbs Creek on. the western edge of Fair- tnpiint Park. Police said Ihree hand gre- nades and the pin of a fourth were found in the vicinity of Ihe guard house. The commissioner said two of the same type gre- nades had been used a year ago to damage 15 city vehicles, in- cluding police cars, in a West Philadelphia garage. Testimony Due in Case Of Monleiths COLORADO CITY Testi- mony in Ihe murder trial of Mr. ami Mrs. Robert Eugene Monlcilh of Abilene was to begin here at 10 a.m. Monday before an all-male jury selected last week. The 23-year-old Mcnleilh, n former Abilene High School athlete, and his 18-year-old wife, Judy, are charged with the alleged beating death of their thrce-monlh-olri daughter, Slephanic, last Jan. 17. The trial was moved here from Abilene last June on a change of venue, but it slill look attorneys five full days lo select 12 jurors from the 81 they questioned. .Some prospective jurors said they had formed opinions from publicity they had heard about the case, but the majority were disqualified because they expressed objections to the death penalty, which the stale is seeking in the case. Criminal Di.st Ally. Ed Paynlcr of Abilene is prosecut- ing, assisted by 32nd Dist. Ally. Weldon Kirk of Swectwatcr and Mitchell County Altorney Frank Ginzel. Monteilh is being represented by Nelson Quinn and Mrs. Montcith by Bob Hanna, both of Abilene. Colorado City attorney Tom liees was appointed by Judge Austin McCloud to assist the defense. Defense attorneys are con- tending that the infant's death was due, not lo a beating, but to being accidentally dropped on her head. point and agree to become weaker If fighting Is renewed on the canal." Israel claims Egypt Is moving missiles into Ihe so-called for- bidden 30-mile-wide strip along both sides of the ca- ii.il where, according (o Ihe cease-fire agreement, no mill- lary materiel may be moved up at least for the 90-day duration of the truce. Mrs. Meir denied Israel .ac- cepted the cease-fire because Us air force could .not stand up to Soviet missiles in the Canal zone. This was a rebuff to Foreign Minister Abba Evan, who said Saturday that had Israel reject- ed tlie cease-fire, it would have lost its air superiority against .Egypt. In Jerusalem informants said the Israeli Cabinet appeared In a crisis, wllh doves and hawks in sharp dispute on whether to continue with the peace talks In New York in Ihe light of the Is- raeli charges.of Egyptian viola- tions. The Israeli delegate lo the lalks at U.N. headquarters is staying in Israel at'least until the middle of the week, await- ing the outcome of the Cabinet debate. Jerusalem Informants said some of the Cabinet minis- ters were seeking to close the gap of disagreement between (he doves and Defense Minister Moshe Dayan over whether to continue the talks in the light of the Israeli charges against Egypt. An Israeli newspaper reported thai Mrs. Melr would send aji- olher personal message lo Pres- ident Nixon urging the Ameri- cans to stop the Egyptians mov- ing missiles into the standstill zone of Ihe cease-fire line. The dally Maariv said she would do so in order to satisfy Dayan's misgivings. President Gamal Abdel Nas- ser of Egypl denied Israel's sev- en charges of violations Sunday. Radio Cairo claimed that state- ments by high Israeli officials indicated that Israel would quit the talks. Yoscf Tekoah, the Israeli am- bassador lo the United Nations, who flew lo Jerusalem last week after a day of Arab-Israeli meetings wilh the U.N. Middle East special envoy, Gunnar V. Jarring, reported to the seven- hour Cabinet meeting in'Jenisa- lem on Sunday. A spokesman said later Tekoah would remain in Israel for another Cabinet session Tuesday. NEWS INDEX Amusements I3B Bridae ..............7 A Classified.......... IO-I3B Comics 9B Edilariols..............8B Horoscocc 9A Hosoitol Patients IDA Cbituories 46 Sports 12.13A To Your Good Hwdh------5A TV Loo.............. 13B Women's NCV.S 2.3B IT tine Snyder Areo Gets 2.75 Inches Rain ABILENE Municipal Airport Total for Year Normal for Year BAIRD BALLINGF.R BRECKENRIDGE BROWNWOOD BUFFALO GAP CISCO COLEMAN COLORADO CITY COMANCHE EASTLAND GOREE HARKELL HERMLEIGK LAWN MERKEL OLD GLORY PAINT ROCK SNYDKR STAMFORD TUSCOLA WEINERT WINTERS .03 13.87 16.03 Tr. .02 .59 .05 .10 .50 .90 .30 Tr. .05 .69 .70 .91 .50 .40 .20 .41 .70 .70 .40 Tr, Rain showers, up lo 2.75 inches in the Snyder area, doited the Big Country Sunday night and early Monday, with Abilene receiving only .03 inch Sunday afternoon. The area surrounding Snyder seemed lo have received the most rain in the area with 2.75 Inches falling on the John Greer farm northeast of Snyder on the Camp Spring road. The J. N. Eike farm near the Lloyd Mountain community reporfed 2.4 inches. A 1.6 inch rainfall was reported seven miles east of Snyder and 1 inch was recorded at the China Grove community southeast of. Snyder. In other parts of Ihe Big Country, Colorado City reported .31 Inch but up to 1.5 Inches were reported south and west of the Mitchell County town. Lake Colorado Cily received .90 inch. Coleman which received .30 inch Sunday afternoon receivsd anolher .60 inch during the night, and Breckenridge received .50 inch. Hermleigh reported .70 inch and HasJccll got .69 inch. Lawn gauged .91 inch for Sunday and Monday and Merkel received .50 inch during Ihe night. Abilcnc's .03 inch rainfall Sunday brought the total for Ihe year to 13.87 inches, slill short of the 16.03 normal for the year. The forecast from (he Weather Bureau at Abilene Municipal Airport calls for partly'cloudy skies Monday and Tuesday with a 30 per cent chance of rain Monday, decreasing to 20 per cent Monday night. The hfgh Monday and Tuesday should reach 90 and the low Monday night will be about 70.   

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