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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: August 26, 1970 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - August 26, 1970, Abilene, Texas                                gpbttcne i: WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE 'SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT Byron COTH'YEAR, NO. 71 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE7TEXAS, 79604, WEDNESDAY EVENING, AUGUST 26, PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS lOc SUNDAY Associated Pntt (ff) 1WW GIRLS! Look How Your Soviet Got Liberated By WILLIAM L. RYAN AP Special Correspondent Hey'girls'. While 'ybu're'- oul liberating yourselves all over the place to- day, you might do-well to reflect on your Soviet sisters: They got liberated. There was a big fuss about this.great step toward. Trouble was, though, that the Soviet la- dies neglected to mind the store. While they were given, on pa- Other Lib Stories, Pp. 4A, 5B per, everything their Western sisters are campaigning for, In reality they wound up with little ol of anything. The canny Rus- sian men still run almost every- thing, and many of the ladies don't even have the tun ot act- ing like ladies. Karl Marx, the granddaddy of communism, said "the founda- tion of female Ihe liberation ot the woman as an her economic independence.'1 faithful sidekick, Friedrich Engels.'pro- fesscd to discover that inequali- ty of the sexes was the result of "economic oppression of wom- en." Since Marx and Engels wrote the bible for the Bolsheviks, it was only to be expected that Marxist precepts would be tak- Agnew: Korea Pullout Ahead SUN-MOON LAKE, Formosa Vice President Spiro T. Agnew'declared today that all TJ.S.: forces would be withdrawn from South Korea when the modernization of that nation's armed forces is sibly within five years. Continuing Asian-tour, Agnew flew from South': Korea to. the Nationalist Chinese island of Formosa after two' days'1 of extended confer- ences "with Korean President Chung Hee Park.' During the-iligh't'to'Formosa, Agnew. .told newsmen It was "very doubtful" that the United States Would leave even a token force in Korea; after the mod- .ernizaUqn of South Korea's army, navy and air force. The United States now lias troops in South' Korea and plans to withdraw by next June 30. South Korean officials claim they need S3 billion in American aid in the next five than four times the present program to improve their forces to the point where they can fight off any North Ko- rean attack without U.S. help. Agnew said he "pointed out very frankly to President Park that at such time a's the mod- ernization program is complete the long range program, it might take five years or more would hope that they would be in a state of economic and inilitary balance that would no longer necessitate any Amer- ican forces in Korea." Asked if this meant all U.S. forces would be withdrawn from Korea within five years, Agnew replied: "I don't know whether five years will complete the pro- gram. "When the modernization pro- gram is completed to the point where military security is intact without American participation, we will, of course, pull out troops from Korea. Whe'lher we would leave any token force there alter that is very doubt- ful." Asked it Park realizes this long-range U.S. withdrawal plan, Agnew said: "He accepts that and I think he accepts it as desirable." Agnew said he and Park "reached a basic accord" but added this did not include any details about the increased U.S. military aid which the vice president announced on his ar- rival in Seoul Monday. Korean sources said Ihese de- tails would be worked out in fur- NEED CASH? look around home and garage for those items lhal you no longer use. Sell them In Ihe Family Week-Ender FRI.-SAT.-SUN. 3 Lines 3 Days M ExtHiM or Rtfund (I nil Rita Appraiirutelv 15 Woidl No Phwif Ordtn Picon SOc Each Additionaf line CASH IN ADVANCE YOU SAVE ABILENE REPORTER-NEWS DEADLINE THURS. 3 P.M. ther conferences between U.S. and Korean officials. Korean Premier Chung Il-kwon, in fare- well remarks to Agnew, said he hoped he would report fully to President Nixon and the U.S. government on Ihe "realities" in Korea. This was a reference lo the Korean government's contention that the Ihreat from North Korea is a good deal greater than U.S. officials think It is, and that South Korea's armed forces need a huge amount of modern military material in the'next five years to make them equal to North Korea's forces. Agnew' landed at a military airport in central Formosa, and a U.S. Marine helicopter took him to President Chiang's sum- mer home here in the moun- tains. Jury Questioning Continues Today COLORADO CITY selection in the murder trial ot Mr. and Mrs. Robert Eugene Monleilh of Abilene entered its third day here Wednesday with stale and defense attorneys attempting lo fill the remaining seven seals in the jury box. One man was picked Monday; the opening day of the trial, and four more jurors all' men- were added Tuesday. Monteith, 24, former Abilene High School athlete, and his 18- year-old wife, Judy, are charged with beating to death their Ihree-month-old daughter, Stephanie) last Jan. 17 in Abilene. The four jurors selected Tuesday included two Texas Electric Service Co. employes, Eldon G. Smith, 49, and Joe Boyd, 45, both of Colorado City, Emory Sweatt, 59, Westbrook farmer and oil field worker, and Cecil Lozano, 48, maintenance man for Colorado City schools.. Lynn Hamilton, 47, of Loraine, was a Monday selection. Twenty two prospective Jurors had been questioned when District Judge Austin McCloud adjourned court at p.m., Tuesday. Six Jurors were excused for cause by Judge McCloud. Two were cut by the stale. Of the six Jurors excused for cause, one said he had an opinion in the case, three objected to the death penally, one said he did not believe in granting probation in a murder trial and one said he objected to the two year sentence the couple could receive if they are convicted. Under Texas law, penalty for murder is from two years to life in prison or death. The five jurors chosen have been allowed to go home and have been told to report lo the .courthouse. Thursday at 9 a.m. Defense atlorneys, court appointed Bob Hanna and Nelson Quinn, both of Abilene, and court appointed Tom Hees of Colorado City have indicated in questioning prospective jurors that they will attempt to show that the child had been dropped accidentally about Jan. 13 and that the Infant's death was due to the fall and not lo the alleged beating of Jan. 10. Quinn, who is representing Monteith, told prospective jurors that the defense is not denying that Monteith struck the baby. Quinn .said Ihe defense is saying that the infant died as a result of being accidentally dropped and .not from being hit. WEATHER U. i. DEPARTMENT Of COMMERCE WEATHER BUREAU (Wtllher Mip, Pg. 4-A) ABILENE AND VICINITY (JUTlHe rediui) Continued lair through Thursday wlfh a Nfch Wednesday In Ihe low Wednesday In the uwer Offd a hfgh Thursday In the mid To upper Wi. Wlrts light and variable, becoming loulherly Thursday. High and 24 hours ending 9 e-m.: 93 and i5. High and Tow for lama period lair year: 91 end 75. tahl: StmMl ntahl: p.m. Sunrise today: a.m. Suniel lonlghl: p.m. en Into account with regard lo women, and women would nev- er have it so good. "Soviet said ils founder, Vladimir Lenin, "is the first and only one In the world to destroy entirely all the old, iniquitous bourgeois laws which have placed women In an une- qual position as compared, with men." Well, said the Communists, that being the case, women would have to be liberated from dependence upon men economi- cally. Out of this the women got the right to work. .They didn't get much else. What's the situation today, a hair century later? Well, it says in article 122 of the Soviet Constitution that women have complete equality with men in all economic, social and political spheres. The labor law, revised as of 1970, lays down in articles SB through 73 ujsl how women are to be protected against heavy labor or harsh conditions. Fact of the matter is that the men simply ignore the constitu- tion and the labor law when it suits them. Any visitor to any city or farm in the Soviet Union can see Soviet women at heavy labor. Indeed, they are the prin- cipal source of farm labor, while men hold down practically all the bureaucratic desk jobs. There is only a tiny percentage of collective farm chairmen who are ladles. In the cities, women do much of the menial work and look it. about, half Uie labor force, leave'. their young in .state-run nurseries while they work as truck drivers, 'street car motormen, crane or other heavy machine operators, brick- layers, hod carriers, building la- borers, street and even lumberjacks and miners. The Soviet press points proud- ly lo Ihe number of Soviet wom- en who are engineers, doctors, lawyers and so forth, are a small minority of the 130 million women in the Soviet Un- ion. The press also notes frequent- ly that there are a large number ol women in government. There are, and most are all powerless. For example, 30 per cent of the deputies of the Supreme So- viet, which passes for a parlia- ment, are women. The parlia- ment is completely without pow- er. But there is no woman on the Communist Party Politburo which runs the country. There is no woman on the party central secretariat. There is no woman heading any central party de- partment or publication. Of all Ihe firsl secretaries bossing par- lies in the ]5 republics around Ihe country al republic and re- gional levels, not one is a wom- an, nor does a woman head a ruling party committee In any important city. One lady bu- reaucrat, Yekaterina Furtseva, is the only ranking government figure, and as culture minister, she has little real authority. Women in Ihe Soviet Union outnumber men by more than 10 million, and have outnumbered the men for years, sometimes by e good deal more. Maybe they need thing like a women's liberation movement RIGOROUS WOMEN'S RIGHTS IN Equality of the sexes in the Soviet Union while theoretically granting women economic inde- pendence also means manual lalxir for families. Sometimes the Soviet Constitution is ignored and "liberated" women wind up bending their backs to heavy construction tasks. Here, heavily. clothed women mix concrete on. Moscow con- struction site; (AP.Wirephoto) Car Bombed; Judge Injured Picture, Pg. 8A TULSA, Okla. (AP) Local stale and federal officials joined in a massive .search today for Ihe person who .tried (d kiU'Dlst. Court Judge Fred Nelson Tuesday with a bomb that shredded his auto and left the jurist seriously A reward fund for the bomber's, conviction rose to Tuesday night, almost before the end of a six-hour operation by four surgeons who later reported Nelson's injuries may be permanent: Gov. Dewey Barllctti who appointed Nelson in 1967, termed the attack "unbelicv- able" arid ordered the Slate Crime Bureau to help local officers. Tulsa Police Com- missioner Brad Scheer said he had asked the Federal Bureau of Investigation to help, and an FBI bomb squad was said to be investigating. The blast was the latest In a scries of bomb attacks on attorneys and judicial ofticials in northeastern Oklahoma in recent years. Fire Marshal Hoy Gann said the bomb, believed lo have been dynamite, was "placed by a professional who knew exactly what he was doing." Court employes, at Ihe direction of Presiding Judge Itobcrt D. Sims, began compiling records of every case judge Nel- son has heard, in Ihe hope of finding some trace of the attacker. Nelson was leaving his home lo vote in his own election when the blast occurred. The bomb, apparently rigged lo the car ignition switch, tore Ihe front end of the car apart. Doctors said he suffered injury to the abdominal wall, and right foot and urinary trad. "Some damage may have permanent said the chief operating physician, "but it's just too early to tell. Although hospital officials said that he was still heavily sedated, Nelson grinned broadly late Tuesday night when told he had rolled up an overwhelming victory ovcr'his two opponents, Charles Gerald Pope and John E. Tharp. Nelson, an incumbent .seeking his first full term, collected votes, almost 70 per cent 'of the total. Other attacks on attorneys and Judicial officials in recent years: Faubus, Albeit Win By THE ASSOCIATED; PRESS Former Gov. Orval E. Faubus of Arkansas outpplled eight can- didates in Ihe.stale's Democrat- ic gubernatorial primary. Tues- day but faced a Sept..8 runoff lo gain a rematch with Republican Incumbent Winlhrop Rockefel- ler.' In other primary contests, Democratic Rep. Carl Albert of Oklahoma won renominalion to a 13lh term. He has no opposi- tion in the November general election and Is in Hoe to succeed retiring Pep. John W. Mo Cormack, speaker. Tulsa attorney David Hall led four-man Democratic battle to oppose Republican Gov. Dewey Bartletl in November but fell barely shorl of Ihe 50 per cent- plus-one-vote needed to avoid a runoff. In Alaska, Republican Gov. Keith Miller was pulling steadi- ly ahead of Rep. Howard Pol- lock in his bid (or nomination to his first full term as Ihe slate's chief executive. Sen. Ted Ste- vens easily won the Republican Senate nomination. Faubus, 60, once a symbol of white resistance to integration, fashioned a substantial-, lead over the field hut, as he had predicted, failed lo gain a ma- jority for outright.nomination. Dale Bumpers, a lawyer rriak- NEWS INDEX Amusements 5B Bridge 5A Glojsirred B-128 Edllorioli 68 Horoscope 5A Hospital Potients........4A Obituaries 6A Suorls 13-15A To Your Good Health------12B TV Loo 9A Women's News..........3B Picture, Pg. 5B Post Office Delivery Depends on 1st Glass By ELL1E RUCKER Q. Why hasn't the mail been picked np on Saturdays? We lave Mt received or been able to send mall for maiy weeks new. A. In your area (Station A) only first class mail is being debvered on Saturday. It could be that there was just no first class' mail' to be delivered and in this case the postman wouldn't stop to collect your mail. If you have a curb type box, put up the Hag and the postman will, stop regardless ot whelhcr or not he has mail lo deliver. Posl- master Clyde Grant Is checking into this for you personally, Just to be sure there's no mix-up, because you should be receiving any first class mail sent to you on Saturday, Ffease help n discussion on the proper way lo drink red and while wines. Is there any difference In me way the wine glass should be held? Also, Is there a certain type of glass to be used with dlftereil types ot wines? A. Yes to both, says Amy Vanderbilt. All wines should be served in clear, thin glasses. Table wines should be served In fairly large glasses, just under goblet size. The rim should be narrower than the base of Uie bowl with Uie exception of the V-shaped sherry glasses. Champagne glasses are best without hollow stems because the warmth from your hand warms the drink. Chilled white wine is grasped by the stem, red wine is drunk with tbe hand grasping the bowl. Q. Could yen please Hid Mt whei tie Dallas Cowbtys play UK Heustoi Ollen li Die Astrodome? This b pie-waiM game acd I have been uuble U flid i schedule. AIM, .wkere eu I tickets for thb game? A. They play this Saturday al 8 p.m. A complete NFL schedule will be published-in The Reporter-News Sept. 6. You might keep your eyes open for that and clip it or write the Dallas Cowboys office al 6116 North Central Expressway in Dallas for a schedule. You could write to Ihe" Astrodome-for tickels to thai gime, but. it won'l do much good because they've been sold out for sev- eral weeks. Q. We kive.a slock tank and we wan( to howlo gel rid of moss and catfcdta wlUMt hanatog: tte fish and frogs. A. YbuTl need a chemical called Sodium DeUpon to control cattails. Mix seven and one-half pounds of Sodium Delapon with 1W gallons ot water and spray the cattails until they're soaked. To ebmlnate moss, use eight pounds of copper sullite per million gallons of water. For best results you should start this In the spring before the moss gels out of control. Now, in anticipation of your next letter to Action Line, if you'll call County Agenl H. C. Stanley.at 672-3286, he'll help you figure approximately how many gallons of water are in that stock tank. Q. I very strung feeling abort the dlsewlliuHM of Ihe police safety cruiser. I'd like to write City Coaidlman personally about Could j on get me.tfcelr names and addresses? A. City Ccincilmen-aTe: Tom Loughrey', 'Dr. 'Joel- Scott ITallaferro, Bob -Childress, .'Dr.i Gordon Bennett, Robert Hunter, Mayor J. C. Hunter Jr. You can write them In care of City Hall, P. 0. Box M. AttreM qoestiOM AetlM Box U, AbUtae, Texas TNM.-Nimes will r be ued brt owsliMi aiist be aid tttxtutt. Ptouc ing his first political race, and slate' Ally. Gen. Joe' were In a close contest 'for tha other runoff spot. Rockefeller, 58, easily defeat- ed three liltle known opponents. He said he was looking forward lo a possible rematch-with Fau- bus who defeated him' in 1964, when Faubus won a sixth two- year term. "He whipped me once, and I relish the fact that I think I can whip said Rockefeller.' House Majority Leader Albert rolled up a belter than 4-1 mar- gin in defeafing rancher Marvin D. Andrews, a political newcom- er. In the Oklahoma Democratic gubernatorial contest, HabVhad been campaigning since he came In third four years ago. He won 49.5 per cent of tbe vole but faces slate Sen. Bryce Bag- gelt of Oklahoma City who started campaigning only, six weeks ago. In Ihe Alaska Democratic pri- mary, former Gov. William Bean led Anchorage grocer Lar- ry Can- for the gubernatorial nomination and slate Rep. Wen- dell Kay of Anchorage was ahead of state Sen. Joe Joseph- son of Anchorage in the Senate race. Xuan Thuy Set to End Talk Boycott PARIS Xuan Thuy, North: Vietnam's chief negotia- tor, returned 'to' Paris loday-and pronounced himself ready, lo end his boycott of the Viclnam peace talks. He also said he would consid- er a resumption of secret talks with the new chief American delegate, Ambassador David K. E. Bruce. Thuy had .been absent from Paris for three months when ha left for Hanoi) ostensibly to reV port lo his government. But In .effect, his. departure was lo protest President Nixon's failure to name a full ambassa- dor as liis negotiating-.counter-, part afler Ihe resignation' .last.. December of Ambassador'Hen- ry Cabot Lodge. Market-Mixed NEW. YORK Stock' prices.opened.rnlxed In moder- ately active Ira'dlng-today., Advances, an 1 -lead over .declining issues, on 'the New York Stock   

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