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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: August 18, 1970 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - August 18, 1970, Abilene, Texas                                "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT 90TH YEAR, NO. 63 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE; TEXAS, 79604, TUESDAY EVENING, AUGUST 18, PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS IOC SUNDAY Asiociated Prest Assistant Editor Fired Again Sargeant Loses Post in Santone 'Razor' Incident SAN ANTONIO, Tex; (AP) The edilor of Ihe Lackland Air. Force Base newspaper, who wrote a senator after airmen ''were ordered to slash a gen- eral's photo from copies of the tabloid, once was Tired from his present position, he said Monday. Sgt. John Polich, former Ari- zona Republic' he and the assistant edilor of Lack- land's former Fort Worth, Tex.j Star-Tele- gram sporls writer Jim Palmer, were temporarily relieved of duty earlier this year. They were sent to another sec- tion, where they" addressed en- velopes" for about six weeks, Polkh'said. He said th'cy were fired because base information officials, among other'reasons, did not like the way articles were displayed. They were reinstated afaiul lyvo' months ago, Polich said.- Then came what some call "op- eration Razor Blade" and Sgt. Palmer again was fired. The razor blade incident grew out of a photo of Maj. Gen. John S. Samuel, Lackland's command- er, in the -Aug. 7. edition of the the unofficial base newspaper." The photo was so narrowly cropped that it showed only the heads of Samuel, his wife, and another general. "Lackland, information officers declared Jhat the cropping was "inappropriate" and ordered 15 airmen to cut .the photo out of copies of the paper with razor blades, Polich said. He said it took about six hours. The airmen were "dumbfound- ed by Ihe order but they im- mediately Pollen said. Meanwhile, he said, "I spent the day trying to stop it through administrative chan- nels." Polcli, 24, Inter wrote Sen. William Proxmirc, D-Wis., who demanded an explanation from the Air Force. Proxmire said it was a "violation of freedom of S. Viets Drive Back Attackers WHO'S THE NEW a little girl Gnu, pound get a little exercise in their folks, complete with a-set-of whiskers and a pen at the Dallas Zoo. Unfortunately, the baby loooong sad face that only a mother could love, hasn't been named yet. (AP Wirepholo) Mother Gnu and her three week old, 50: Plague Fleas Found On Governor's Dog By LAHRY CALLOW AY SANTA FE, N.M; (AP) Gov. David F. Cargo says fleas infected with bubonic' plague have been found on his family's rriongrej dog, Snoopy. Cargo, said 'the dog had been, completely detleaed and health officials said there was little chance of the governor's family -contracting Ihe dread disease.- Cargo acknowledged reluc- tantly Monday that Snoopy had been -found harboring .fleas in- fected with the scourge that de- cimated the population of Eu- rope in Uie Middle Ages. "He's been completely de- Cargo said. "They've had some trouble with the plague in the neighborhood and took some precautions on it." The affluent residential area Jn the >ilis north of Santa Fe, site of the governor's residence, produced -last week New Mexi- co's fifth case of the plague this year. The unidentified 20-ycar- old woman' was reported recov- ering. Health officials were edgy Monday about saying whose dog had the plague. Neil Weber, director of the vector control unit of the de- partment, would say only that the dog' was tested during a ''routine'SUTveillance." He saw ho danger lo the fami- ly where the dog was found but acknowledged: "If if the fleas hop off. and bite a person, there's' a chance the person will be infected." He said a medical check of the Cargo family was negative. WEATHER US DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCI (WMIMr ttW, ABILENE AND VICINITY (a-roTt wdiui) to parlly ctoudy tol Tunday Ihrougli Wedneldky wild a N0 bom days Kir 1W and a .low WMdir night In the upper Kit. Wlndi from I'M wulhwnl 10-70 m.p.h. High and KM far U hours ending t n and 71. HUfi wxi kw hr yuri Asked if the dog was his. Car- go acknowledged that Snoopy's fleas were less than ordinary. Weber said bubonic plague in Its 'early stages, if diagnosed correctly, is easily cured with antibiotics. he said, have a built-in immunity. He said there was nothing to connect the Cargo dog wilh defected cases of the plague. No other stale has had more detected cases of bubonic plague among humans in the past two years then this sparse-: ly populated Southwestern state. -Health officials say the. five cases so far this year In'New. Mexico and the five last year don't represent, the entire inci-' dence of the disease because many cases are cured by ran- dom doses of antibiotics before they are diagnosed. Retarded Patient Strangles in Line AUSTIN accidental'death of a patient during a game of "Cowboys and Indians" could have been avoided with adequate supervision, the superintendent of the Austin Slate Hospital said today.. Arnold. Blackburn of Beaumont-died of strangulation last Wednesday night. Justice of the Peace John Ross Jr. said a "clothes- line like" rope was wound around Black- burn's neck. Ross said Ihe palient, described by Su'pl. Larry, Talkingtdn as "severely was romping oh the playground wilh several other patients at the lime. "1 don't know if he fell out of a tree or what. 'No one Boss. said. He ruled accidental strangulation Monday night. TaliinglonTsaid three attendants were on duty at the 6fl-paliont ward at the time, about half of the number he said-was needed. He said repeated pleas lo the Texas legislature for additional supervisors for the 1900-patlenl school for the mentally ill and mentally retarded have gone.unfulfilled. "It is no secret we are he said. By GEORGE ESl'EK SAIGON (AP) More than 100 North Vietnamese attacked a Souih Vietnamese night camp before dawn today in northern South'Vietnam, but the South Vietnamese drove the atlackors off, said they killed 38 of them, and reported only one defender wounded. It was the only significant ground action reported as heavy rains and low clouds blanketed Ihe northernmost provinces. But the U.S. B52s were out as usual, wth 50 of the big bombers flying raids, mostly on the Lao- tian side of the border. The North Vietnamese at- lacked a South Vietnamese unit In; night bivouac eight miles west of Fire Base O'ReUly, one of seven allied :artillery bases guarding.Ihe approaches to the populous coaslal lowlands. Planes were called in to illumi- nate the attackers wilh flares as Ihe men in the camp fought back. -L In addition to the'38-enemy killed, the South Vietnamese captured one prisoner, three heavy weapons, seven rifles and 300 blocks of TNT, South Viet- namese headquarters said. One round of mortar fire also hit O'Reilly but caused no dam- age, the headquarters said. In Cambodia, the Viet Ccng ambushed a large rice convoy on its way to Phnom Penh Mon- day afternoon and a military spokesman said a great deal of rice was taken. He said he did not know what happened to the 'Cambodian troops escorting the convoy. The ambush occurred 45 miles north of Phnom Penh. The-spokesman also revealed that Cambodian Premier Lon Nol made his first visit to a bat- llefront Monday. A helicopter look him 80 miles north of Phnom Penh to Kompong Thorn, which has been under siege for more, than a month. While he was there a brief fire- fight look place on the edge of the town. The premier returned NEWS INDEX Amusements.......... 6A Business News 11A Bridge................3A Classified............5-7B Comics 4B Editorials 1OA Horoscope 78 Hospital Patients 7 A Obituaries 2A Sporls Ticket Stubs 6A To Your Good Health____3A TV Log.............. HA Women's News........2.3B to Phnom Penh before lunch. Japan's biggest newspaper, Asahl Shimbun, reported today that Prince Norodom Sihanouk, the deposed Cambodian chief of state, told it that Chinese Pre- mier Chou En-lai and North Vietnamese Premier Tran Van Dong have discouraged him from returning lo Cambodia at the present lime. Sihanouk; in a written, reply to questions submitted by the newspaper's correspondent in Peking, said Ihe two premiers told him "the conditions for safety aro still inadequate in Ihe liberated area." the press and a waste of the. taxpayer's money." Palmer said It was he who cropped Ihe picture so It would fit in to a very narrow space in the paper. He said the incident "amounts to censorship." "It was unnecessary, time con- suming and a waste of the lax- payers' he said, em- phasizing he was speaking as a privale individual. "I was ordered to run Palmer said. "Most o( the pa- per was prctly well wrapped up and I said (here was no space in Hie paper for It. Bui I was ordered to run it anyway." When Ihe pholo appeared, I .was lold this represented a kick in Ihe teeth to the new Palmer said, adding that no snub was intended. Ho said he. was dismissed as: assistant edi- lor and assigned as a special projects wrilcr. Lackland spokesmen confirmed the incident bul said they would have no formal statement until they received a copy of Prox- mire's letter on lire mailer lo Air Force Secretary Robert C. Scamans Jr. HEAD IS SWITCHED Mortician Facing Charges In Body's Bizarre Burial HOUSTON, Tex. (AP) The State Board of Morticians said Monday it'will take action with- in 30 days on charges brought against a local funeral home di- rector in connection with the burial ot .one -man's head on' another, man's body. Manly Richard Mabry, field representative for the board, brought charges alleging that Norman G. Brooks Sr., funeral director of Brookwood Funeral Home, put "certain false infor- mation" on the dealh certificate of Joseph Flowcrbird. Flowerbird, 66, a Kiowa In- dian, died here July 26, 1D63. His body was sent to the Uni- versity of Texas dental branch in Houston for use in anatomi- cal studies. Bui after relatives were noti- fied of the death, they requested the body be recovered and giv- en a funeral. But an exhuma- tion autopsy last June revealed that Flowerbird's head was bur- ied with Ihe body of Joseph Conners, 59, whose body also had been sent to the school. Testimony in a public hear- ing before the board Monday showed that Brookwood Funeral Home, which had a contract for the burial of paupers, had sent both bodies to the school. Dr. Orzo B. Wiswell, associate professor of anatomy at the school, lestified he told the funeral home Flowerbird's body had been cremated and all he Market Surges NEW YORK (AP) Slock market prices surged ahead in opening trading today. By a.m., one-half hour after. Ihe start of trading, the Dow Jones average of 30 indus- trial stocks had leaped 7.12 points, or 1 per cent, to 716.18. had left was Ihe head. According to Wiswell, the rep- resentative- from Brookwood who came to get Flowcrbird's head "wanted to know if they could pick up another torso they had brought 1 Wiswell said Ihe only, reason he hart released Conner's body was that Brookwood had origi- nally brought it to the school. Wiswell said about a month later he suddenly wondered why Hrookwood wanted a head and an unrelated body. He said the two were not joined when they were taken away. Brooks and Charles Griffin, owner of Ihe funeral home, told tha board the head and body were loosely joined by stitches and 'they had no reason- to be- lieve that it was not the entire body ot Flowerbird. "At Ihe time 1 picked It up it was represented lo me as Mr. Flowcrbird and I buried him as Brooks 'said. The board began Its investi- gation aflcr it received an anonymous loiter Brooks laces cancellation, re- vocation or suspension of his 'license if Ihe board finds him guilty. Louis Mchr, Brooks' law- yer, said he will appeal any con- viction. "There was a burial of Mr. Mchr. told the board. "It may not have been all of him, but It was a burial." Nerve Gas Vessel Hearing Burial Site ABOARD THE USS HAR-- TLEY (AP) A derelict ship neared ils ocean burial ground today and an cighl-man team of specialist planned lo sink it and ils cargo of obsolete nerve gas rockels in three miles of water by nightfall. The dilapidated Liberty ship LoBaron Russell Briggs made good lime under low by Ihe commercial tug Elizabeth Mor- an afler being slowed carter by rain squalls and choppy seas. The bad weather had threat- ened to delay the sinking until Wednesday, but skies cleared late Monday and Ihe hulk and ils convoy of escort vessels sped toward the dump area northeast of Ihe Bahamas. Navy Capt A.G. Hamilton Jr., in charge of the sea phase oi Operation Chase, was confident ME Rundown Requested on Violent Deaths todayi By ELLIE RUCKER Q. How many people have died violent deaths IB Abilene this year? How does II compare wllh past years? A. By violent deaths, were assuming you mean murders and suicides. According to City Police records in 1966. there were 4 murders, 5 suicides; 1068 had 3 murders and and 7 suicides. In 1967 there were 7 murders, 5 suicides; 1968 had 3 murders and 6 suicides. i965 had 8 murders and 8 suicides. Two of the eight "murders" in '69 were charges filed in connection with auto -accidents, (negligent So far. this, year there'nave been'5 murders and 4 raddes. It appears there Is a slight rise In Q. Was Daylight Savings Time starled daring War II? If not, who Is .responsible for starring II awl Is responsible for cpitlnnlig it? Alsowhy A. It wag Introduced during WWI U a measure to save coal that was used In producing electricity for lighting. First daylight savings was sponsored by National Daylight Savings Assn. In 1967, Congress passed the law about Daylight Savings, but Ihe law gave permission for any slate, by legislation, to exempt itself. (Hawaii and Arizona voted not to accept Daylight Savings Expressing your opinion to your state representatives or senators, Is the best way to change this. Q. I'd like (o know Johnny Cash's address. I once saw It In Action Use, but didn't write It down. A. Write him at Columbia Records, 51 W. 52nd St., New .York City 10010. And while we're on .the subject (someoae'f. always Cash har never served a prison, sentence; he was in'the El Paso Jail overnight for bringing dexadrine pills into the country. He was convicted bul his sentence was probated. He also.spent the night in a Georgia Jail while sleeping off the effects of an overdose of pep pills. 
                            

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