Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: August 17, 1970 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - August 17, 1970, Abilene, Texas                                WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT POTH YEAR, NO. 62 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, MONDAY EVENING, AUGUST 17, PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS lOc SUNDAY Associated Prea (ft Reds' Dumps Hit By All B52s in Far East ;i COCO THE CLOWN AND SON, 'COCONUT1 Raymond gets his nose fixed Circus Still Luring Despite TV, Disney By EARL AM'MERMAN, Associated Press Writer SAN FRANCISCO (AP) Neither television nor Disneyland has dimmed the Jure of the stars and bangles of the circus, says Coco the-.CIown, 40-year veteran of big lops and arenas. Patronage was; up 20 per cent this year and extra seats had to be put'in the Anaheim Convention the boulevard from the vast Walt Disney_recreational ex- Booby Trap Claims One Policeman OMAHA, Neb. (AP) Eight Omaha policemen apparently were lured into a dynamite trap In a vacant hcusa on the city's Near North Side today and one was killed and seven hurt. Lt. John Bozak said a booby- trapped suilca'se on the living room floor of the two and one- halt story house: in a predomi- nantly Negro section exploded, blowing the house apart. Tfio slain officer was Larry Mcnard, who would have been 30 on Thursday, Deputy Police Chief Glen Gates said. Menard had been on' the police force Blnce February 1963. One policeman, John Tess, was. hospitalized with- leg wounds and was in fair condi- lion. Six other policemen -were treated at hospitals and re- leased. Gales said eight policemen were dispatched to the area aft- er a report a woman was screaming. He said there had been a number of "crank" calls from the area in recent days. Apparently Gales said, "a dynamite trap" was planned. Market Mixed NEW YORK slock jr.crkel opened mixed today. Ad- vances look a narrow lead over declines. Price changes were fractional. Ringling Bros. Barnum Bailey's "Greatest Show on he-said. "We don't know what it is, (he magic, the spell, whatever it is some alchemy it's and teen-agers -.and "hippies, they're still up front in our Cnco said in an interview while awaiting the Ringling opening in Oakland Coliseum Friday. "AH sorts of things were supposed to ruin movies, television, leaving the big top out but our crowds .go on 'getting more enormous every he said. Switching from Ihe tent to arenas seems to have added lo Ihe atlraction, he added. "Believe me, those tents were hot and animal smells could bet he said, "but these huge coliseums we're playing in have air conditioning and suction. "With the lavish new lop, maybe the show is a little more sophisticated these days, with so many beautiful girls, but it's still all there. The suspense of the high wire acts wilh nothing beneath them, the .brealh- laking Irapezists, the daring lion and tiger tamers, it's all still there, and it's strictly for real. These people risk their lives daily, there's nothing phony in the Arid Ihe clowns? "Well, the clowns are the additive, we keep things going between acts, but maybe we're a little Coco saioV clowns .are not universally intriguing to children, he said. "We-frighten :lhem if we get he .said: "Our makeup is a bit loo much for them." A "funny thing" however, is that children are so-much more .developed, these days than they used to be, of television, he added. "A 2-year-old these days seems lo have the same reactions as a 6-year-old used lo." Coco, born Michael Tolato'vas in Lativia, 48 years ago, is a: third generation clown. The Coco said, was created by his grandfather in Russia. His father, a veteran performer in England, has been made a member of the Order of the British Empire. By GEORGE ESPER Associated Press' Writer SAIGON (AP) The: United Stales today committed its en- tire Pacific force o[ D52 bomb- ers against the new Communist offensive in the northernmost provinces of South Vietnam! Nearly 100 o.t the big bombers from Guam, Okinawa and Thai- land dropped some tons of Soviets In Venus Probe MOSCOW (AP) The So- viel Union today launched an unmanned space 'probe to ex- plore the planet Venus. Tass said the spaceship, which it called the "automatic interplanetary station Venus would "continue the exploration of the planet Venus, which was earned out earlier by Soviet au- tomatic stations." Tt said the spaceship 'was launched at a.m. Moscow lime a.m. EOT -r- .and together with, the final stage'of the rocket carrier was put into an interim orbit of the earlh. At Moscow lime, the. re- port continued, the engine b[ the final stage was switched on for just over four minutes lo boost the rocket out of orbit and on its way. Tass said at noon Moscow time 5 a.m. EOT Venus 7 was more 'than miles from earth..; "Venus tra- jectory close (o the present.. the .Soviet news agency said. "All the. systems and scientific equipment on board the station are fqnctioning nor- mally. The night" is controlled by the long-distance space com- munication center.1" The first man-made object to reach Venus was the Soviet Un-" ion's Venus 3, launched Nov. 16, 1965. It crashed oh the plant March 1, 1966. It claimed that three subsequent Venus Nos. 4, 5 and on the planet's fiery surface and sent back information. The an- nouncements made no mention of "soft indicating the craft burned on reaching the surface or that their transmit- ting' equipment went out be- cause of the heat. Venus 4 was launched in June 1967. Past Venus shots have cov- ered trajectories of 217 million miles, or about 50 million linear miles, the trip has required a little more than three months. NEWS PEX Amusements 5B Bridge 1 IA Classified 11-148 Comics 1 OB Editorials 8B Horoscope..............6B Hospital Patients........45 Obituaries.......... 2A Sports 13-I5A To Your Good Health 7B TV Log.............. MB Women's News 3B bombs on North Vietnamese supply and staging areas on both sides of the Laotian border during the past The raids were the heaviest in two years in the sector. In- formed sources said clouds' prevented any accurate assess- ment of the bomb damage, but several secondary explosions in- dicated hits on ammunition stores. The U.S. Command ordered the H52s out in full force after attacks Sunday on seven allied bases guarding approaches to Ihe populous coaslal lowlands of Quang Tri and Thua Thicn prov- inces. The U.S. Command also an- nounced Ihat three American helicopters were shot down on the Laotian side of the border Saturday, two of Ihcni as they tried to rescue the crew of Ihe first chopper downed. Head- quarters said one American was killed, two were missing and live were wounded in Ihe crash- es. r' 'v 11 BOMBERS- ATTACK IN FOUCE Nearly 100 of the U.S. Pacific force of B52 bomb- ers dropped bomb loads Sunday arid Mon'day against the new Communist offensive in the norlKernmost provinces of South Vietnam. Flying from bases at Guam, .Okin- awa and Thailand, the big bombers hit North Vietnamese supply and staging areas on both sides of the Laotian border. (AP'Wirephoto) Senator Demands Reason For Razor-Happy Cufups WASHINGTON (AP) A sen- ator has demanded an official explanation of why 15 airmen armed wilh 15 razor blades spent a full day cutting holes in newspapers be- cause "someone didn't like" the way a general's piclure was dis- played. When the Aug. 7 edition of the the base news- paper al Lackland Air Force Base, Tex., was distributed there was an unexplained hole, three columns wide and 2Vz inches deep, neatly carved in the center of page 5. An official spokesman for the base public information office was quoted in a Texas newspa- per as saying the space had been occupied by a badly cropped photograph of Maj. Gen. John S. Samuel, Lack- land's commander, which was "very inappropriate for a gener- al." The photograph showed Sam- Ucl receiving the Legion of Mer- it from Lt. Gen. Arthur W. Ob- erbeck, director of the Air Force's Weapons Systems Eval- uation Group, ft was cropped narrowly, displaying views of Ihe heads of the two generals and that of Samuel's wife. Oberbcck's three stars could not be seen. The spokesman 'explained It was impossible to reprint the page and, "The only avenue open lo us was lo cut (he pic- lure." He said the general "in no way" influenced the decision and wasn't told about it until after operation razor blade had begun. The objectionable photograph and its caption were placed be- tween a holtom-of-the-page ad- vertisement for blue jeans and an article telling of the introduc- tion of "soul food" in Ihe base's mess halls. Sen. William Proxmire, com- plaining of Ihe incident in a let- ter lo Secretary of the Air Force Robert C. Scamans Jr., said, "ft these facts arc accurate, I think Ihis was a violation of freedom of Ihe press and a waste of the taxpayer's money." In a letter to Proxmire, a Lackland airman told of Ihe in- cident and said, "The effect, in addition to the deprecation of the base through the distribu- tion of a newspaper containing an unexplained hole, has been the personal embarrassment of the commanding general, the illegal mutilation of cop- ies of Ihe base newspaper which is Ihe property of a civilian pub- lisher, and the disillusionment of Ihe information office staff. Official sources said they be- lieve the enemy pressure against (lie allied bases along the Laotian border and the De- militarized .Zone Is part of the preparation for a big push against Ihe Saigon govern- ment's pacification program in the lowlands. North Vietnamese gunners laic Sunday slammed nearly 200 rounds of rockets, morlars and recoilless rifle shells Into five allied bases along Ihe DMZ. It was the heaviest attack in that region In more than a year. Al the'same time the'North Vietnamese for Uio eighth day kepi up attacks on Iwo allied (ire and Darnell 25 .miles south of the DMZ along the Laotian border. Three ground fights were re- ported around the bases. Casualties and damage were reporlcd light over-all, but one South Vietnamese artillery base, Fuller, tour miles south of the was hard hit. Seventy rounds from 120mm morlars slammed into it, blowing up an ammunition dump. A score or more South Vietnamese troops were killed, and as many more were wounded. The U.S. Command said sev- eral Americans were killed in the other shelling attacks, but none was wounded. Casualties reporlcd in the groincl fighting included 18 North Vietnamese, two Ameri- cans arid three: South. Viet- namese killed, and 12 Ameri- cans and seven South. Viet- namese wounded. South Viet- namese, troops from Fire Base O'Reilly also uncovered an ene- my stockpile of more [nan -200 rocket and morlar rounds'Iwo miles from the base. WEATHER U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ESSA BUREAU (Weather Map, Pg. 4-B ABILENE AND VICINITY (a-mlla dlus) Clear lo partly cloudy and hoi through Tuesday wllh a high boih Her noons near 100 and a low Monday Ighl In Iho mW 70s. Wlndi from 1hc HjIh US m.p.h. High B.id low lor 74 ending 9 m.: 97 and 75. High and lev; for same dale fa si year: 02 and 73. Sunicl Jasl rTghl: p.m. oday: a.m. Suraet lonlghl: p.m. Drug Case Won By Candy Barr City's Last Trolley Ran June 14, 1931 By ELLIE RUCKER Q. What day, month and year did they run the last street car In Abilene and Bia( strecls were Ihe tracks on? A. The street car service ended June 14, 1931. The line started at H-SU down Simmons Ave. to Merchant, south past N. 10th lo N. 7th, made an "S" curve where the Irack crossed Grape. 'It turned south oft N. 7th on Orange to N. 3rd, east on N. 3rd to Tine, down Pine across along S. 1st to Chestnut, down Chestnut lo S. 7lh and on S. 7lh past Sayles to Fair In November, 1908, the streetcar made ils maiden voyage wilh great-fanfare anil all the town dignitaries aboard. When the trolley' reached the end of the line, the brakes failed, Ihe ear crashed Into a Iclchone a.b-nrbed wire fence and landed in 'a muddy ditch. Except for tlielr dignity, Ihe dignilaries were unhurt. Q. Will you please tell me who was Governor of Texas In A. Lawrence Sullivan Hoss was governor from Jan. 18, 1887, jo Jan. 20, 1891. Under his administration'Texans''first anti-trust law was passed. He was born In Iowa in 1838 and began his political career as sheriff of McLennan Counly. Sul Ross Stale University was named after him. Q. I need to find out wmHhing real bad. Can (he Army keep a boy In service If he has had feel or If they are flat? Or is there anyway I can get him enl because he's a sick boy? He's my oily son. If yon can find out for me these few things, 11 sure would help. A. If he's definitely having problem with his if they are'flat, he should report il lo his first sergeant and then go to sick call. The physician will Ihen dclejmine whether or nol he should be retained in the service. .Maj. .Glendon'- Hanna, station commander (or the Acmed Forces Exam- ining and Entrance Station, said they can usually detect flat feet In the initial exami- nation, but of course a few may slip by. He said that If your son's complaint is valid, he'll be given a discharge. Q. My frlenrt and I would like; lo know the address of Paul Revere and Ihe Raiders, Mark Lindsay, Bobby Sherman and James (I forgcl his last name but he slars In Hawaii Flve-0) and Jack Lord. As soon as you answer this we have a thousand more questions for you to answer. Thanks for this valuable Information. A. Oh lo be 10 years old again! You can probably reach Bobby Sherman, elc. by writing to their record companies. Write Sherman at Metromedia Records, 6515 Sunsel Blvd., Suite 201A, Hollywood. Write Paul Revere and Lindsay at Columbia Record, 6922 Hollywood Blvd., 702 Los Angeles. Write James McArlhur and I-ord In care of CBS, 51 W. 52nd SI., New York 10019. Q. Several mfwtfcs ago you had a question In your column aboil the peace.symhol, and what II means. A friend of mine sent me a brochure which says Ihe peace symbol Is actually a broken cross and (he Communist symbol for anli-Chrlsdnnity. A. Your friend sent us a few of brochures too, but according to Peggy Duff, who was General Secretary of Ihe Campaign for Nuclear Disarmanent when Ihe symbol was designed, il represents Ihe semaphore for the letters ND, standing for nuclear dis- armament. The broken cross represents the death of man, and the circle represents the unborn child. This is a reference to the genetic effects of nuclear weapons. ft WES designd by Gerald Holiom for the first march from London lo Aldermaslon al Faster MS8. Aficr Ihat it was used for marches by Ihe Campaign for Nuclear Dis- armament and by groups working for nuclear disarmament. It has become a general symbol of protest, linked lo peace issues. Address questions (o Action Line, Box 30, Abilene, Texas Names Hill mil be used hnl uestlons mist be slencd and addresses given. Please Include telephone numbers II posslblf. By FOY A. JONES II Reporter-News Staff Writer BROWNWOOD Stripped of ils evidence by a court ruling last week, tho state Monday dismissed marijuana possession charges against former burlesque queen Candy Barr. Conceding that his evidence was as skimpy as the costumes Miss Barr used to wear, Dial. Atty. George Day asked Ihat Ihe charges be dismissed due lo "insufficient evidence" when District Judge Joe Dibrcll called the case for trial about a.m. THK EX-STRIPPER, known In night spols from New Orleans lo Ihe West Coast, was not present when .fudge Dibrell granted the motion. In fad, she was "oul of according to one of her attorneys, Ben Snddcrth of Brownwood. Sudderlh said he has expected the charges to be dropped since last Thursday when Dibrell ruled that Ihe prosecution could not submit as evidence marijuana seeds which police said they fnuntl in Miss Barr's room here, but he added, 'That's something you never know unlil the case is called." HE SAID HE could have had Miss Barr in court "right away" if they had decided to go ahead with prosecution. "In viow of Ihe ruling by Ihe court last Day told Judge Dibrell, "The stale is without further evidence lo present and asks dismissal on grounds of Insufficient evi- dence." 'Motion Judge A Dibrell announced, bringing lo an end a case which made headlines from the lime the former stripper was arrested in a room she rented here March 11, 1989. POLIC1-: SAID they found 13.9 grams ot marijuana seed in her room during that raid. Miss Barr, who married at H and was stripping in Dallas nightclubs when other girls her age were in high school pep squads, was convicted in 1957 on possession. She said she was just holding it for a friend. If You Plan to Visit The Reporter-News.. .....today oixJ in the fu- ture the editorial de- partment Is now located in Ihe new building, of South First and Cypress. Enter from Ihe under-the-building parking, take elevctor or stairs to sec- ond For arculnlion, odvertfsfno. and business office colls, use. the old entrance, corner of South Second and Cypress.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication