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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: August 14, 1970 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - August 14, 1970, Abilene, Texas                                OR vyitH WE-SKETCH YOUR WORLD: EXACTLY. AS IT 90TH YEAR, NO. 59 PHONE J; EVENING, AUGUST PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS ioc SUNDAY Auxtattd By BLUE RUCKER Cereal Filler Illegal Q. I uwferstixid.jthat'-tbe legtslatore recently passed a Mil making to! add clc.' te.be sotd. This'.being true, .Vo-uW. if be nilawf Hi 'to ;idd bread. Id harnb'urgers to be sold and who would be the enforcing of such A. We're a little confused as to which legislature.passed that .bill._We .talked with a Texas a meat packer arid the They all said.lhat under Federal cereal.-.or other .s.iich fillers tria'y added to "-.certain, meal productsvas..jpng as .Ihe- product doesn't contain inpfeUhan ;and. if it's such. Now, if a'pr'oduct was labeled "ail meat" but contains a filler, then this is illegal. .Q. How much does" (be Pope, In Rome receive as a salary? doesn't receiye''ariy salary; in fact, his'salary is actually .reduced .when he's elevated from Cardinal.- to A Cardinal's salary is a month, and from that he goes to a grand total of zero when he becomes Pope, according to Nina La Bella's book, "Trie ;Valican .which deals the finances of the Vatican. Q. tell me where I could birth certificate ln: California? was .Saa will before school siartsJCan you the Bureau" of -rV.ital Statistics Scat of the; County, .i where Ijv this '.case... It. would request and.-include his father's blrthdate.' ;Q. I would like to know If there Is a Karen Valentine fan club la Abilene or- near If. there, is, ..who dp I Ai; Action Line couldn't find a trace of one, -butiif this may.smoke it out. Karpn; ,yajenline plays Alice Johnson, the young'sluden'l teacher, on 22- 2." She has an unusual right clogs up just before anything good happens lo her such as getting the part on Room 222. The Sunday, July had an article on her thai you would enjoy reading. i'Q. I've heard.of a boy here In Abilene, who was In the service four days and Is oow gelling a medical discharge with a penslpB and Ihe government Is sending him In an electronics school. >What 1 would like lo know-Is why.'ihey didn't catch' Ihls trouble when'he had his physIcalT-Tiils looks to me like they are cheating lhe government. i A, You're righty this dbcsn't.quite add up. Greely Aston, county 'Veteran's' Service officer, explaned the government policy like this: If a man is discharged because of a disability that existed before his he's not entitled to: any benefits. But if a man is injured, through no fault of his own, right after entering the service, he's eligible for benefits. Be gave an example irf a man with less lhan days' service who was shot and Injured by mistake Vat a military. rifle In ,Uis; Instance, the goveriiiniBt: responsJble and he's entitled AslM doesn't kiiow'il. yoo raeBtloBed; yen might.phone ;klm at if you have more infermatlon on the subject. Address questions lo Action Llae, Bo% 38, Abilene, Texas 796M. Names will not. be used bnt questions'must be signed and addresses gtvey. Please Include telephone numbers U possible. Rain Scarce, Buf Not Gone Rain mOiy In these parts, but it's not a IHng past as an area around Snyder received up to 1.50 inches during the night. Snyder, ilself, recorded 1.14 inches near the airport and at Ihe high school, but the D. M. Pogue farm near Hermleigh recorded 1.50 Inches and (he Lloyd 'Kirby, farm one mile north and four miles east of Hermleigh reported 1.06 inches and is" located near The Charles Cain Jarm received 1.01 Inch Snyder two miles east on the Roby highway. Sweetwater, however, reported only a trace of moisture while Breckenridge inch- Abilene, a chance for rain a Blight 20 per cent according. to_. the Weather Bureau at the Municipal Airport. Tfie forecast calls for possible scattered showers .Friday and Saturday with a' high both days near 95 and a low Friday night near 75. days since Abilene- has recejvcd'jihy measurable rain, and the-I2.47- lnch: total for the year Is almost three Inches below the'normal.' DAYS Crowley, 12, is reunited with his mother at North Memorial Hospital, after .he was found "alive.ahd well" on rugged in New "Hampshire. The boy, frony Mass., be- came eight days ago frpin a summer camp hiking group. He existed on blueberries (AP Wife'ph'otb) Boy in 'Good Condition' After M n Eight Days Lost on Mountain (AP) AX year-old -boy .was ;lost for' eight in. While .Mountain National.Park told his rescuers: "Pm.Danny Crowley He found Thursday on a 'of-Ml. Passacohaway aboiil miles from where- he strayed away from, a 'group., of hikers attend- ing a summer camp "His condition; is amazingly said- at Cpnway's Memorial Hospital where the Boston youth was or- dered. to :bcd.-' "He ;was very heallhy afler going through that. He was: tired, kind of. dry .from not i haying lo He told hjs rescuers he drank from a-small waterfall and ato 'blueberries. -He -said he slept .daytimes because he was afraid to sleep at night. He said he heard noises in the dark woods and believed bears were in the Study Second Note MONTEVIDEO, Uruguay (AE) The Uruguayan govern- ment loday studied an unauth- enlicated message .found in a Buenos Aires cafe which indi- cated the Tupam.aro guerrillas might murder "the Brazilian dip-" lomat they kidnaped: The mes- sage made no mention of Amer- ican agroito'mist'iClaude L: Fly, who was kidnaped-last Friday. Officials in Montevideo could not confirm Lhe authenlicily of the note found in the Argentine capital 150 miles up the Plale estuary. But it contained Ian- guage similar -lo lhat'used in 10 previous messages from the ur- ban -Tupamaros, and it was de- livered in the same left in the reslroom of a cafe.- The 'communique said Dan A; Milrione, !lhe kidnaped Ameri- can police adviser .whose body was found Monday, .had been sentenced lo dealti for "collabo- rating with the forces of repres- sipn." It said the process of "re- volutionary justice" for 'Brazil- ian .Consul Albysio Mares Dlas Gomide, 41, "'couM be halted il the Uruguayan government re- leased -about; 15( prisoners1 de- the Tupa- marps. '_ Arr earlier .message, relayed lo aulhoritiesVTuesday, said Dias Gomide and Fly, a 65- year-old consultant lor the Agriculture' Ministry, both wore in good h'eallh and had not beerr sentenced yeU'The later note said the Brazilian repre- sented "one of the bloodiest dic- tatorships in America, whose -tortures and assassinations go lo such limits :thal they have been denounced by the justice commission of Ihc United Na- tions." The nole said the government bears "total and absolute re- sponsibility" for Milrione's murder. The government has refused to bargain with the guerrillas, maintaining the pris- oners whose release is demand- ed are criminals rather than po- litical detainees. Some police and sol- diers continued thcjr search of the Uruguayan capital for traces of the kidnapers and their two captives. About 80 sus- pects were rounded up Thurs- day. The kidnapers have warned that if their hiding place is discovered, both their host- ages will be killed immediately. U.S. Forces Cut In Saigon Area area. "I prayed every .night to be he said.. 1 He was able to walk down a trail lo a highway and a car aft- er he was found by Arthur An- derson, 24, an instructor at Franklin Pierce College, and Tom Desrosier, 15, a Keene high school sludent. They were among the more than 200 per- sons who searched for the boy during the last week. When (hey descended over a rocky ledge in an area covered by underbrush, they heard "a whimpering walked to- wards it and'found the Crowley youth. They gave him a chocolate bar and some other food left from Iheir lunch.. At the hospital, the boy asked for an ice-cold soft drink, "and we gave him Dr. Jones said. She said the boy fell asleep right after he was put to bed. The-boy's mother, Mrs. De- nise Crowley said: "I feel so wonderful because he looks so !wpnderful." She said she fell "down" when the search party was re- duced Wednesday "but I still knew they'd find him. "He said he did a lot of pray- ing and I was doing a lot of praying, NEWS INDEX Amusements 17B Bridge 1 3A Classified........ 10-I6B Comics 98 Editorials SB Horoscope............ }5B Hospital Patients........9A Obituaries 6A Sports 14-16A To Your Good Health 7B TV Log.............. 13A TV Scout........... 1 3A Women's News........2.3B SAIGON (AP) American .forces in the Saigon military re- gion are being cut by about men as the result of a major reshuffling of. allied units and the transfer of a large base to the Vietnamese, official sources disclosed today. The sources said hyo full bri- gades plus other units would be shipped home from Saigon and the 11 surrounding provinces of Ihe 3rd -Military Region. Men who have not completed most of thoir 12-month tours In Vietnam will be transferred to other units. Security regulations prohibit publication of the units to be sent back to the Uniled Slates until the U.S. Command an- nounces them. Elsewhere In the war- Small ambush, actions and mopping up operations were re- ported along the northern coast where U.S. and South Viet- namese forces claimed they killed more than 300 North Viet- namese in fighting Wednesday and Thursday. One harrassing action was re- ported in Cambodia. A military spokesman in Plmom Penh said the Viet Cong and North Viet- namese apparently were occu- pied with integrating newly ar- rived reinforcemenls. Gen. Creighlon W. Abrams re- turned from convalescent leave with his family in Thailand and resumed his duties as com- mander of U.S. forces in Viet- nam. His gall bladder was re- moved in Japan July 3. In the major reshuffle of al- lied forces in the Saigon region, all American combat units ex- 1 Mart Opens Higher On Broad Front NEW YORK opened higher on a fairly broad front in moderately active trad- Ing. Advances led declines by a narrow margin. cepl one brigade have been pulled back from the Cambo- dian border. Most of them have been moved to Ihc northeast and cast of Saigon, Inland from the Soulh China Sea. South Vietnamese forces have replaced the Americans along the border west and northwest of Saigon to block North Viet- namese infiltrators, and the Tay Ninh base camp 55 miles norlh- wcsi of the capital has been turned over to Ihe Soulh Viet- namese 18th infantry Division. Only a few hundred U.S. sup- port troops remain at Tay Ninh, which once was the bisc for two American brigades. While the Soulh Vietnamese army carries out the blocking role in and along the frontier, the protection of the 3.5 million persons living in villages and bamlets in (he region Is as- signed to the militiamen of the Territorial Forces and People's Sfilf-Defense WTRC Pulls Out Of United Fund The West Texas Rehabilitation Center lias withdrawn from ils participation in the United Fund, it was announced following a joint meeting of the executive committees of both organiza- tions Thursday night. The decision to pull out was unanimous and was based on the scope and activity of WTRC "which has grown to the point (hat it is no longer feasible" for tire agency to participate In the United Fund. President of the Abilene United Fund Walter Johnson said, "The West Texas Rehabilitation Ccnlor has been a vital and' cooperative agency within the framework of Die United Fund tor the past 1Z years. The of during this period of time; has been remarkable and Is a trlbule to its fine and dedicated leader- ship." "From a small local children's center serving primarily Abilene, ils area has expanded lo serve a substantial portion of West Texas. The highly skilled and trained staff has gained Social Security Is 35 Years Old Today ANN ARBOH, Mich. (AP) Social Security, subject of rag- ing controversy in ils infancy, is 35 years old today. Some of the chief architects of Ihe Social Security Act are hold- ing a little parly in Ann Arbor during a break in tho 23rd an- nual Conference on Aging. "II was a great recalled Wilbur Cohen, who was a 22- yearold researcher in the ad- ministration of Franklin D. Roosevelt and helped draft the act. "Everybody was elated about it." Cohen laler worked for the So- cial Security Board and years later supervised Social Security operations as secretary of health, education and welfare under President Lyndon B. Johnson. He is now dean of Ihe College of Education at Ihe Uni- versity of Michigan, which is host to the Conference on Aging. Cohen recalled the sharp at- tacks on the act by Alf Landon, Roosevelt's 1936 opponent for president, who called it "a cruel hoax on the working man." When Roosevelt signed (he act Aug. 14, 1935, even some In the Democratic administration were concerned that it would be overturned by the Supreme Court, Cohen said. The court up- held it in 1937. Cohen attributed the Supreme Court decision to Roosevelt's overwhelming victory over Lan- don and lo his efforls lo enlarge the court. Cohen said "the Su- preme Court got the message and began changing. "That is why I say Roosev- elt's effort lo pack the court was successful." Arthur Allmeyer, 79, first commissioner of Social Securi- ty, wag Invited for today's cere- monies in Ann Arbor. He is the only surviving member of the original Social Security Board, Cohen said. He said Hoosovelt would sure- ly be surprised lo hear that some of his old Republican foes had come to support Social Se- curity. He said life insurance now in force under the act equals all the privale life insur- ance in trillion. national recognition for their accomplishments In treating the handicapped Johnson said. "As ils various services have expanded over an Increased area, ils operating budget has grown some 900 per cent, from slightly over to he said. "The United Fund Is cognizant of the center's need to focus its appeal for funds on a regional basis, and that In order to do so, It must have the latitude to make Its dtivo (or funds on a direct Johnson said. "We arc most appreciative of Uie leadership, and staff oE this fine agency for their splendid coofieralion during these 12 years and assure them, of our continued and wholehearted support as I hey terminate their affiliation with the other fine agencies who make up the United Johnson said. Bobby Sayles of Tuscola, president of WTfiC board, said, "On behalf of the board of directors of the WTRC, we want to express our appreciation lo Ihe Abilene United Fund and the people of Abilene for their support which has enabled WTRC lo have a substantial financial base from which; to operate and grow." "It is only after a great deal of study and consideration that the executive commiilce of Ihe Wesl Texas Rehabilitation Center made Ihe decision lhat future funding of the center needed to be more direct and broadly Sayles said. "The board of directors and staff of the. center pledge their continued 100 per cent Fair Share support to the United Fund and Us participating he said. WTRC Executive Director Shelley Smilh said Friday morning lhat he was nol certain how the situation would alfect Ihe fund raising projects of the center. "Our goal Is lo.have a really successful Cattlemen's Round- up for Crippled Children, but we have no plan from he said. Smilh said the center hoped to make up the difference of Ihe yearly allotment from the United Fund through memorials and monthly gifts. In other action, the United Fund executive committee adjusted the budget and goal of the Uniled Fund from lo to reflect the amount allocated WTRC by the budget committee. Salurdir wllh hta'itelli illernoor.i ncir ntghl nMr 71.- pi-ctublllly cf rlln per cert Frttaf UirougK Saturday wtodi from S-Hrn.p.tj.'.i ,i High 14 Kwi.xvUng 9 Hhjti ind Im for Mmi ptrtod bit Vtar: 104 ami 71. Sunirt lltt pfetll: B.m. .Jwirh4 todiy: ter.ict taltshl; tm. Benefits Are High Enough, Says First Recipient MISS IDA FULLER dWi-'l at Ike oimber By MICHAEL C. SINCLAIR Associated Press Writer BRATTLEBORO, VI. (AP) White-haired Miss Ida Fuller cashed her Social Security re- tirement check this month, her 368th since receiving the first one ever issued 30 years ago. That first check was for Miss Filler recalls, but it was nearly five years later be-" fore she was told Se- curily officials lhal ste was the firsl In the nation lo receive benefits under Ihe program. "When I got my first check, I didn't even stop lo look at the: number on she said. "I.just, cashed 11.1 wanled the money." The Soda! Security Adminis- tration is celebrating Ils 35th an- niversary loday. Monlhly pay- mcnls began in 1WO. Miss Fuller doesn'l think any more payment increases are needed. "It's bean raised as far as it ought to she said Thurs- day. "Every time they raise 11, they raise the amount taken away from the working people who pay Into it and It's just get- ting lo be too much of a bur- den." Three years ago, she sold her home In Ludlow where she was born and lived for 92 years. Now wilh a niect here, "I pay-my board and I have a little Income from my savings interest and what money I got for my house when I sold she said. She had rented an apartment in her home to help pay the tax- es and other living expenses. "No one could live on Social Security alone and maintain a home at the same she said. "The only way Is to live with someone else, if you can." She remembers her days as a freshman at Black River Acade- my In Ludlow and a senior classman named Calvin Cool- Idge. "He wasn't anything but just a boy in school she re- membered, "just a member oJ the senior class and I wasn't particularly Interested in them." After receiving a teacher's certificate at age 17, Miss Full- er taughl school for a dozen years, then attended a Boston business school. Afler gradua- tion, she'worked for a Ludlow law firm until her retirement in November 1939, two months be- fore Social' Security: took effect. Ida Fuller will be 96 on Sept. 6, and by then-she'll have re- ceived' her '369th Social Security check. "You can't live on It of course If you've got plher expenses lo pay, but It's a she said. "I now get they take out Ihe (or medi- care."   

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