Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Abilene Reporter News: Tuesday, August 11, 1970 - Page 1

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - August 11, 1970, Abilene, Texas                                V WITH ,WE SKETCH' EXACTLY AS IT 90.TH YEAR, NO. 56 PHONE 6734271 ABILENE, TEXAS, EVENING, AUGUST 11, IN SECTIONS lOc SUNDAY Aisocialed Pnst (ff) ing B 52s Unload on Near Laotian Border (AFi) B52 bombers' attempted to scatter North'; V i e t n a me s e troops reported massing: for an attack '6n' Vietnamese artillery and'.patrol, base near the northwest1: frontier' with f'-... r Twenty of the.big bombers loadeil of .bombs'on ene- base. camps' and staging areas .within'three miles of Fire 'base1 O'Reilly, one of five allied set up in'the area to block an.enemy advance into the 'populous coastal low- lands 20 miles to the east. Tacti- cal and helicop- ter gunships flew through anti- aircraft .fire to pound North Vietnamese positions closer to the base... Associated Press correspond- ent Willis. .Johnson reported from ,O'Reilly, that despite the heavy enemy gun-, ners were" still firing mortars Into.the base..: North Vietnamese, infantry- men'struck a few hours before dawn with machine' guns, gre- nades and flame throwers, at- tacking government troops in night bivouac half a mile south of .the base. Maj. Nguyen Van, of the .base, said 15 North Vietnamese and one South .Vietnamese, were killed and four government Iroops were wounded. Officers '_ said at least seven South Vietnamese have been killed and 45 wounded in three 'days of fighting around O'Reilly. :Most of them were in patrols operating from the base. The regimental. commander, Col. Nguyen Van Diem, estimat- ed more Uian'200 enemy killed by'air and artillery In'the three days of and said about 50 more had been killed by South Vietnamese Infantrymen. A sixth base, Rlpcord, was abandoned ,by of tho U.S. 101st Airborne Division last July 23 alter North Viet- namese troops killed 61 para- troopers aiid: wounded ,345 in a three-week siege. O'Rcilly, a former iplsl Air- borne base reopened the, Soulli Vietnamese 1st Division last March, sits on a Deadline Passes GEORGIA BOY .-i. .Governor LeUer'Or'Maddojr'rjf 'Georgia" relaxes ,on the' cabin cruiser assigned to him 'after the open- ing session of the national Governors' conference in Osage Beach, Mo. (AP Wirephpto) By ELL1E RUCKER Cases Back School System Q. Is tkere any tnrih to the'rauwr that tte faculty and the Abilene School Board cannot "make'.', yon (any mate student) get a haircut as in atteidaMce rule, but dm mlykecpjyM from membership of spedal: schoel organizations (honor sKrety.'ath'ieHcs) because of hair collar, ears, .in eyes, etc. as ta: last-year's dress A. Nrjj.as long as you're eligible to attend school, you're also eligible for membership In the school'clubs and organizations, but if your appearance causes a distraction or interferes .'with- the instructional program you can lie suspended from school, said school SupUWplls. Several Federal District Court cases have backed" the schools in their dress codes, (Wood Vs.''-. Alamo Heights -Independent School' District, 'Pritchard vs. Spring r-'. 'Clossifrcd 5-SB ..Cornice .-.4B Editorials.' .-IDA .Horoscope .'.-'XA ''.Hospital Patients i 5A -Obituaries.' :i'2A Sports _8T9A Ticket Stubs 7A To Your Good Health I A Log 1 1A TV Scout :'.MA Women's News 3D MONTEVIDEO, -Uruguay (AP) .The murrleir' of: a kif.- naped and a now execution threat increased fears today for the lives of Brazilian consul; anil "an American asri- cuHuraT expert rstill .held by :he Tuparharo guerrillas. 'A'local radio station reported that-a body hid been found ;near a Evenue.and ppssibly was th'at.of the 'Brazilian.' liplpmat. Police arid spidiers searched, the area but reported they found no .tody. The leftist Tupamaros abduct- td'U.S. police adviser'Dan; A. Milnone and Brazilian' Consul Aioysio Mares Dias Gomide on July :31 and demanded: the re- lea'se'of all political prisoners in Uruguay as ransom. The gov- ernment refused: to. deal witn the kidnapers, and Mltrioiie.was found shot to death early Mon- day in an abandoned .stolen cir. Friday ;the .guerrillas seized hostage; L. Fly, 65, of Fort Collins, Colo.. an, American agricultural ev- peri .working for the Uruguayan government. A Uruguayan television sta- tion received a note Monday saying the kidnapers would cut-.- Gas Leak Closes ordered a flag kit whlrt" was''advertised IB the R-N. I sent a perswillzed check for I have not received the Hag kit and the check bis not. through the bank yet. On July I seit a JcHer.cpaeerslig tils, and enclosed 'a' self-addressed postal card reply. I havts not received a reply. Do yoiT'-have any Idea -why I haven't received the Hag kit? Is Inere any way of finding out If my order was received? Should.I.have my buk slop payment on (his check in case It falls Into the wrong hands? A. Action Line checked on your check and it hasn't fallen among thieves. Here's what happened: After filling over 1200 Hag kit. orders, the R-N ran put of flags. More have been ordered re-ordered) but because of a sudden demand for'flags all over Ihe country, the company is behind in filling its orders. Another letter went to the flag company Thursday reminding them that 200 people are waiting for. their Mags, but Circulation Manager Frank Pruitt said he will gladly return your check if you're lired of wailing. Q. We're sending yon some old awl wonW like to know if they are worth anylklag. if they aren't worth ajvyUilig, If (key arc, we would like to kave them back. Q. It regard to (he stop light at Cyprtss and N. 1st of the depci, yw drive east, is required stop'at tie first crosswalk when the Hgnt Is red tr may fce jrteeed the iccMd, ttiei stopplig between the two? A. City Traffic Engineer'says pull to Ihe. second light in front of the second crosswalk. Pedestrians "are supposed to use. the' second (east) crosswalk. ArMrrss tpxstlMs to Artkw Hut, Box M, AHkte, Texas 7HW. Names will be Bsed qaestrtiis mist, be slgied addresses given. .Please letepitac lumbers U possDHe. t> ALBANY-U.S. 380'remained.' "THE BLOWOUT Is sending closed Tuesday :morning vaporized gas out of the creek slate police closed the'rqad at about.75 feel from the highway, p.m. Monday duetto a said. natural gas..blowout whicli is vaporizing as it causing safety' 2% c'otnes wt through the miles Moberly said. "Then It .Slate'; Highway'pepl. fofficials Tuesday! momirig -that no.' change, in'the condilions had been reporte'd the highway; would remain .indefinitely. -Av' ;TraH'ic is halted--in j and 'miles. southeast of. Alb ah'yraitdlis bei rig "dclourcd by way of-FM.'576 and U.S. 283. t Oil and gas men estimated the gas .had.been escaping rate of three cubic'feet per day since the blowout was discovered at dusk STATE POLICE described the fire, hazard as ''acute.' Bulldozers threw up fire.breaks" and'scraped grass, in. a SOVfoot wide fire guard around -.-the blowout. County .Sheriff Jack. Moberly reported-Ihe gas was rushing to the surface along a creek, i He and .others speculated it might be from an old gas well, capped and forgotten years ago. 'condenses land falls like remained at the nearest house, the Bruce Bray .home-one-fourth mile south of the.' spot, but said the heavy jidoij.vof gas might force them 'to'leave. Mrs. Sidney Moore, wife of an Albany fireman, told of seeing hitee cracks spread in the ground as the gas burst free 200 feet up and down the creek. PUSHES UP huge rocks and later spews 25 to 30 feet high, throwing up a dense she said. "It looks just awful." Highway Patrolman Jerry Tucker said if the gas leak did come from an old well, the gas 'may have spread Into a layer of porous gravel below the surface. The highly-pressurized gas would follow Ihe gravel until it surfaced, he said. This apparently occurred in the creekbed. Tucker said gas was bubbling up in a 100-foot- long portion of the creek. ciile Daias Gomide r.t midnight the estimated 150 political prisoners were not freed. Gov- ernment security agencies re- fused to confirm Ihe authentici- ty of the note, arid the deadline passed no word .from the kidnapers. The note djd not mention Fly Congress met in'special ses-- s'on Monday and approve President 'Jorge Pachecp; Are- cb's request fflr suspension all Individual civil rights for JO gives the police more freedom Ic their massive search for the kidnapers and their host- which already has result- ed in the capture of 100 suspects and top Tupamaro lead- ers..- The government also broad- ened press censorship, forbid ding newspapers to publish pho- tps related.to the Mitrione kill- Jrig'. They, are barred from re- ferring .the .Tupamaros by name under earlier .censorship Cqhgress declared Mprjday a 'day "of" mourning "for Mitrione, and all. businesses and Offices vjere closed. The streets of the capital vtere deserted Monday night 'except for heavily armed policemen and soldiers makirg the search. After Mitrione's body was found, Dias Gpmide's wife made an emotional radio appeal to the government and people of Uru- guay. Sobbing, she said the guerrillas had told her in a mes- sage to urge the public to jiather in front of Government House and demand that the president frefi the' political: prisoners. "For the love of God, my be loved Uruguayan she pleaded there, do it, imi- tate everything I for the life of my husband." Political demonstrations ar3 illegal in Uruguay, and there was no public'response to hrr appeal. Pacheco Arecd a. statement' denouncing tho slaying 'of Mitrione but reiterat- mg his, refusal to deal tTicrrillas. whom he calls com man criminals. "We hoped that a trace ot sense would avoid this crime." the president said. "We and all the' -Uruguayan people were shucked by this inhuman and traitorous episode." In Washington, State Depart- ment press officer Robert J. McCloskey' said Ihe U.S. govern- ment had'urged the Uruguayan government to ;do cverythi-p WEATHER U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE E5SA WEATHER IUREAU (Welttltr Mlp P9. IS) ABILENE AND VICINITY rfldCus) Fair and wvm Tuesday, Tueifey nlghl and High and Wedneiday near M. Low Tuesday In the low 70'i. Llghl winds. tow; (w ending 9 a.m.: 73 and 69.' High end low uirx dalt last year: 104 snd H. Suhiel last nfghl: tunrha loday: tim.i sunsel tonght; p.m. possible to secure the safe re- turn ot Mitrione. But he said Washington, did not press Mori ievideo la meet the kidnapers' demands because that would ".n- couragc n'her terrorists to kid tap more Americans. Milripnc, 50, had- been chief in Richmond, Ind., aud was an under tha U.S. aid program to Ihe Uruguayan liplice. His wife and five of nine children were wilh him In Montcyiclco. Mitrione's body was sealed in a metal container Monday nijiit at a local funeral home an] plr.ccd in a coffin. Fu- neral arrangements were In- complete. The widow visited the funeral home Monday and left, sobbing, with a U.S. Embassy official. Fly's wife movoi'l in with a friend -after her husband was kidnaped and has been sedation since then, T ridge less than five miles north of Ripcord.-It is north ol the A Shau valley and 12 miles from Ihe Laollan border.. Maj. Gen. Is'go Quarig Truong, 1st Division commander, said clomcnls of three North Viet- namese regiments had moved inlo the region from Laos. Ha predicted, "an all-out effort 16 gel O'Reilly.'1 More Ihan enemy troops have .been, reported within a mile of Ihe base, and U.S..Air Force and Marine fighlcr-bonib- ers have been pounding them for three days. Patrol clashes have been re- ported around .O'Reilly, since Sunday. Military spokesmen said South Vietnamese'Iroops killed 20 enemy soldiers in a series of skirmishes around the base while 'helicopter gunships from the 101st .Air- borne cut down 13 others with rockols and machine guns. Soulli Vietnamese casualties were described as'light. O'Reilly was shelled Sunday and Monday.. The U.S. Command also re- ported' three Americans killed and six wounded In a sharp fight 40 miles northwest of Sai- gon. Enemy losses were not known. )n Phnoni Penh, a Cambodian military, spokesman reported that Viet Cong frogmen were in- tercepted wliile attempting to reaclt Hie Chrul Changvar naval base on Ihe Mekong River a mile northeast of the capital. There have.been a series of ground probes, against-the outer defenses of Phnom Penh in the past week; somo as close as five miles to the Family Hitchhikes 280 Miles So Son Can Have Operation NEED CASH? Look around the house and garage for ihose items )ha) .ypu no longer use. Sell them in Ihe _ Family Week-Ender FRI.-SAT.-SUN. 3 Lines 3 Days ExtcnstM RtfiMd Approximately 15 Average Woidi No Phone OrJen Only 00 iOc Each Addltionaf CASH IN ADVANCE YOU SAVE ABILENE REPORTER-NEWS DEADLINE THURS. 3 P.M. GALVESTON, Tex. (AP) Odell Shirley of Lampasas is a determined man! So determined that he and his family of five hitchhiked 280 miles from Lampasas to Galyes- ton for a: severely burned son to be treated at the Shririers Burn Institute., Six-year-old Ronald Shirley suffered second and third degree burns over most of his upper body Dec.' 21 when he accidental-, ly donned a gasoline soaked shirt which lay in a pile of clothes 1o be laundered. He moved near a stove to warm his hands and his shirt burst into flames, the father said. Ronald had come to the hosv pilal in Galveston for surgery about six times prior to Mon- day's journey. This time the operation was to loosen the skin about his neck so that he cari move It freely again, the 43-year-old father said. "All of us had to ex- plained Shirley, an employe at the Lampasas golf course. "Both the wife and I have to sign Ihe papers .before they'can go to cutting ori.his neck. "We couldn't get anyone to take care of the other kids so we had to bring them, too." The other two children also are boys, ages 10 and 12. Shirley's car was wrecked June 13 in an' -accident at La Marque while the family was re- luming home from Galveslon after one of the operations. Ths license plates were re- moved by state authorities after the accident and Shirley has been unable to replace them. Doctors have said the opera- tions lo Irelp the boy regain flex- Market Prices Open Lower NEW YORK Slock prices opened lower on a fairly broad front in moderate trading today. Losers outnumbered gain- ers about 2 I'o.l. Ibility In his upper body would cost about a fee Shirley cannot pay. The. institute is pro- viding the needed treatments free, he said; The family made, it to Houston with a salesman from Lampasas. From there two Houston police- men carried the family across the city.' Two other officers look the family-to Galveston after they finished work Monday night. Shirley said the family, prob- ably without Ronald, would hitchhike back home today. Prim Nudists Rap 'Girlie' Magazines WASHINGTON (AP) At first blush it seemed like a good giggle: the American sunbath- ing' association denouncing "mi- die" magazines and showing a movie on how to be properly naked. It alas, quite proper.. Evpn'pnhi. three card- 'carrying: ;riudisis, fully- clothed an4 news ence wtth'rjrioth.decbnirn; "Nudi'e" com- plained assocte.llbn presjdent Thomas "are so far from portraying philosophy of the association' Lhit we can no longer polni with pjrde and say, "TTiis Is nudism'.1'" Coin, a pizza maker from Elk- hart, Ind., said 800 association members met in J convention near here last weekend and vot- ed to direct their national head- quarters, to stop, sales of all questionable publications, He said .this .would mw.r.a'.tyMO, yearly loss In-revenue.: for Jibe the magazines to members. Ori the table before Coin lay a slack of the offending maga- zines, marked "Adults only" and showing naked people ca- ressing and simulating sexual acts in groups of threes, fours ''an'd fives.': -Golnisald the decision to.de- nounce such magazines caused controversy within the associa- lion, which for years fought le- gal battles for the right to pub- lish without air-brushing geni- lals. "We are not he said. "We .are overwhelmingly against censorship. "The association is' not against sex. But we are .against portrayal of sex'in magazines- as part of (he nudist philoso- Phy." Goto said nudism Is misun- derstood by most Americans and hudie magazines have In- creased the confusion. He said that while the associa-. 'tton Has; there may be'iip to one million nudiaU' In the United States. you'sleep in the nude, work around the house in the nude, you are actually practic- ing the nudist philosophy with- out knowing he said. 12-minule documentary film ;on nudism, entitled "The Take; showed unclothed familjes-i-halry legs, pot bellies, pimples.! and: swimming and playing volley- ball. It looked wholesome. Before showing the film, Coin warned the 50 newsmen attend- ing thit everyone shown was en- tirely niide and "If anyone here objects perhaps It might be bel- ter to leave now.1' 1 There' was no. stimpcdc for the door. tiiiJ CARRYING TORCH FOR LIBERTY These huddled misses yearning lo breathe free are members of wom- en's liberation movement who affirm their cause, with, clenched fists.in front of Statue of Liberty   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 155+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 155 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication