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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: July 30, 1970 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - July 30, 1970, Abilene, Texas                                OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY IT 90TH YEAR, NO. 44 PHONE ABILENE, 79604, THURSDAY EVENING, JULY 30, 1970 PAGES IN FOUR SECTIONS lOc SUNDAY v Aaociated PreuyP) Women Unfit for Leadership, He Soys Planner Raises Feminine Dander By JIM LUTHER Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON _ A high .Democratic policy -planner who says women are physically unfit for leadership lias rejected his sexist label and Hie notion he might become Public Enemy No. 1 of the women's liberation movement. "Let them look at my creden- tials it they think I am prejudi- said Dr. Edgar F. Bei1- man of Lutherville, Md., .a member, of the committee: on .'.-national-.priorities of the Demo- cratic National Committee and former personal physician to Hubert II. Humphrey. Herman raised the dander of feminists by saying such pccu- larities as the menstrual cycle and menopause liinit the leader- ship potential of women. stalled Ihe first popula- tion-control section in the Stale dear to women's liberation. 'I have been active in striking abortion laws. I am interested in day care, medical care and equal pay for equal hesaid-in an inter- view Wednesday night. Rep. Patsy Mink, D-Hawaii, has called Herman sexist with the "basest' sort of prejudice against women." And Joseph A. Callfano Jr., co-chairman '.of the .Democratic policy has opened Ih'e door for Herman lo resign, call- ing the physician's statements inappropriate and an affront to the .concept of equal opportunity for women. Berman refused to talk about resigning until seing a copy of Califano's statement which was released Wednesday. Although the controversy came to light only this week, it started at an April 30 meeting of the policy planners when the discussion got around to wom- en's liberation. "Suppose we had. .a mcno- pausal woman president who had to make Hie decision on the Bay of Pigs, or the Russian con- tretemps with .Cuba at the TEL. AVIV Sources in, Tel Avjv said today the PalesL tinian guerrillas are planning heavy strikes against Israel from Jordan and Lebanon in an effort to prompt .Israeli counter- attacks and. undermine pros- peels [or peace. The sources said there has been an escalation in guerrilla activity along the Jordanian and Lebanese fronliers since Kgyp't accepled the U.S. cease-fire pro- posal a week ago. The guerrillas have rejected' [he con- demned Egypt for accepting it-.- and have vowed to continue fighting. The Israelis said guerrillas fro'ni Lebanon .sel off. explosives. Wednesday dren's dormitory in an Israeli settlement in northern near the Lebanese border: A dozen children werp sleeping in ths building but there were no casualties, the sources said. II was the first reported guerrilla penetration of a. settlement on the Lebanese border in six months. Military spokesmen also re- ported that an Arab infiltrator was killed Wednesday nighl in a clash with Israeli troops near the Damiya bridge over Ihe Jor- dan River. No Israeli casualties. were reported. Israeli and Egyptian artillery exchanged "extremely intense" rire'loday along Ihe entire 103- mile length of Ihe Suez Canal, Israel reported. Two Israeli sol- diers were reported wounded. A military spokesman in Tel Aviv said the Egyptians opened fire first. Israeli jels joined the battle, hammering Egyptian guns .and fortifications along the entire 103-mile length of the canal, Ihe spokesman reported. All air- craft returned safely, lie added. Later, the spokesman repqrl- four Egyptian 11IG21S were shot down by cannon and air lo air missiles when they attempt- ed to intercept the Israeli war- planes. In the Israeli-occupied Gaza Strip, guerrillas blasted an elec- tric power pylon Wednesday, nighl, blacking out slreel lighls WEATHER ESSA WEATHER BUREAU {Wcatricr Map. Pg. J-A) ABILENE AND VICIMITY radiui) Parlly cloudy wilh hoi aller- nooni Thursday arol Friday. High bjlh allErraws near 100 arKi low Thursday nighl near 75. Wiixrt from Ihe soutn 13-30 and tovi tor U hours ending 9" a.m 100 and 7i. Hioti ant low for sams period- lasl year: 53 and 43. Sunsel lasl p.m. surriw rcrfay: a.m. SunMl p.m. in a refugee catnp. I1 Iraq's pledge lhal ils troops in Jordan will support tlic Palestinian guerrillas in' their opposition to the U.S. cease-fire proposal was de- scribed by Israeli sources today "of liltle practical signifi- cance." Israeli officials refused com- ment on the announcement.from Ilia t I he Iraqi .conlin- Jordan had.been put un- der the guerrilla command and that Iraq, would lluvarl the proposal even if it meant an Arab civil war. But other sources in Tel Aviv said this promised no change in (he situation along the ian border. They said Ihe Iraqi troops were already giving "ac- tive support to the terrorists in Jordan" by shelling Israeli terr-. ilory. Some quarters speculated that the Iraqi move might further .undermine the position of Jor- dan's King Hussein, who with Egyptian President Gamal Ab- del Nasser accepted the U.S. proposal for a 90-day cease-fire. Bill sources in Damascus also considered the Baghdad an- nouncement a. gesture lo em- phasize the solidarity of the Baalh Socialist regime there with the Palestinian comman- dos. Hussein reporledly hedged his acceptance of the U.S. proposal wilh a declaration that he could nol force the guerrillas lo com- ply, something that events in re- cent months have proved. Pre- sumably he also would.make no attempt to check the Iraqi troops on his territory. Herman said. "All things being equal, 1 would slill rather have had a male J.F.TC. make the Cuban missile cnsis decisions than a female of sirni- lar age who could subject lo the curious nient'al aberrations of lhal age group'." Herman says his statement was made half in jest, "But cer- tainly it lias a basis in fact. If anyone doesn't know that during pregnancy, during pre-men- strunl tension, during meno- pause thai there is a physiologi- cal and psychological change, any physician will tell the surgeon explained. "It's not a matter of politics. It's just a matter ol he added. Mrs. Mink later wrote Hum- phrey, asking that Bprman bu removed from the committee. "As a physician, his use ot the menstrual cycle and menopause to ridicule women and to carica- ture all women as neurotic and cmolionally unbalanced was as indefensible and astonishing as those who still believe, lei alone dare lo slate, that the Negro is physiologically she wrote. Mrs. Mink's letter, Berman responded, was "a typical ex- ample ot an ordinarily con- trolled woman under the raging hormonal imbalance of the per- iodic lunar proving the point against which you rail." UNDER FIRE FROM THE XiALS Dr. Edgar F.. Berman .of lAilher- who 'has. said ;wom'en' are physiologically unfit for leader- ship doesn't Ijke the idea he might be labeled Public Enemy No. 1 of the women's liberation movement. (AP Wirepholo) KEPT CHILDREN OUT OF'SCHOOL Dr. and Mrs. Howard Scott of Belmont, Calif., were lined ?10 each Wednesday for keeping five of their 13 children oul of school. They claimed California educational statutes violated their constitutional right to guide the faith and morals of their children. The children were Coleen, 14, Kathy, 1J; Michael, 8; Tim, 10, and Sharon, 12. (AP -Win-photo) Couple Claims Law Violates Their Right to Guide Children SAN MATED, Calif. (AP) Dr. and Mrs. Howard Scott, who say slate laws requiring school attendance violate their right to guide Ihe faith and morals of their children, have been fined each for keeping five of their children out o( classes. After finding they violated the state law and imposing Ihe pen- ally Wednesday, Municipal Court- Judge Marcel Biscary said: "I feel for the Scotls and I'm certain there are many per- sons who agree with until Ihe law is changed, it must be obeyed. Mrs. Scott said she and nor husband, who are Roman Cath- olics, objected lo sex cducaiinn and other family life courses being taught at St. Matthew's Calholic School, which-the five A Changing Nation Census Figures Depict Flight From Cities to the Suburbs By JOHN M. PEAUCE Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP) A new statistical mural of a changing nation is emerging as the Cen- sus Bureau forges ahead in ils count of an stimatcd 205 mil- lion people. So far, llic Bureau said Wednesday, have been officially counted, but lhat figure is updated every day as more local offices close and re- port their iolals to Washington. Forty-two slates arc com- plete, at least in preliminary form, and five rcpnrt fewer pco- .4 pie than they did 10 years ago when the last Census was taken. The major change, however, is in Ihe cilics. Almost every re- port documents the flight of Ihe population from the central cit- ies to the suburbs. Of Ihe 41 areas reported so far, 18 central cities actually lost population, and mosl of Ihe other 26 gained less Ihan their surrounding suburbs. Most major cities and the largest of the states, except Texas, have riol yet been com- pleted. In New York City, for example, Ihe bureau had diffi- culty finding enough enumera- tors U> contact people who had nol felurhed Iheir forms by mail. New mayor Kenneth Gib- son sent from door (o door ac- companied by reporters and photographers to dramaliae the importance of the-Census, Of the completed stales, popu- lation' declines were shown in Mississippi, North Dakota, South Dakota, West' Virginia and Wyoming.- St. fjtiuis is the largest city for which preliminary figures are available, and It showed a de- cline to from youngest children attended until the parents withdrew them last year. The Scotls have cighl oth- er children, all grown. She contended that California public and parochial schools teach a cioclrine of lhat man instead of God con- trols his that this is a form of religious teaching barred by Ihe Constitution, Mrs. .Scott said she and her husband would not appeal the verdict. "We feel that we have, in effect, been vindicat- she declared. "We may send the children back to school, but they will keep Iheir eyes and cars open and if we feel Ihcre are continued viola- tions of our religious rights un- der Ihe we will lake other action.." Mrs. Scotl founded in 1968 a group called Uniled Parents Un- der God, which she described as "completely husband and I.are Homan Cath- olics, but our membership in- cludes Lutherans, Southern Baptists and a broad spectrum of religions." The judge noted that slate law provides thai a child may be kept oul of school only if a pri- vate tutor 'wilh valid stale cre- dentials is provided. Mrs. Scott has testified that she conducted the children's classes In her home with the help of friends. Whitis Is New Coach at H-SU By MICHAEL GRANT Glen Whitis, the man who guided Howard Payne College to a position of national basketball prominence, lias been named head '-V basketball coach and athletic director at Hardin-Sim- 115 University. Dr. Klwin L. Skiles, president of H-SU, also disclosed at a Thursday morning news con- ference lhal Russell Wayne BciTy also .of Howard Payne, will join the Cowboy staff as assistant basketball coach. Both appointments arc effective Aug. 1. Kkiles, citing Whilis' "out- standing record of achievement at our neighboring school, Howard Payne said he was "delighted lhal our. facully alhlelic committee has brought these men lo us, and that we can present Ihemvlo Ihe school, Abilene, Lhe stale and the nation." "I'm just Ihrillcd" Skiles said. "I feel like giving 15 rah-s for Ihcm. I believe it will be a new day for nur athletic program." The 44-year-old Whilis said, "I; indeed, feel it's an honor and a pleasure lo be here .in Abilene and at Hardin-Simmons. I've always admired you you are and what you stand for." He didn't promise any mir- acles but said "As far as I am concerned, H-SU is going to do everything they can lo have a winner." Whitis knows quile a bit about winning. In his 15 years at Howard Payne, Yellow Jacket cagers have won 2fi4 .games while losing only 141. His 1969-70 squad won ?8 and lost 4 en route lo a number three national small-college rankfng. He's 196D-G9 learn also earned a ihirrt place national ranking. Whitis, a native of Kcmper, is a 1950 graduate of Howard Payne and received his master of arts degree from Sul Ross State University in 1953. He began his coaching career at Pyotc High School in 1950 as basketball anil football coach, guiding Ihe latter lo a district championship. He coached at Monahans for two years before moving to Coleman where he produced two of the finest teams in the school's history winning 57 contests. Whilis is married and has two children. Berry, who is head of Ihe hcallh and physical education department at Howard Payne, has served as Whilis1 assislanl the past two years. He is a 1M3 graduate o[ Howard Payne and earned his graduate degree there in 1361. The 30-year-old graduate of Abbott High School, captained Whitis' 1M2-C3 Yellow Jacket squad. OJ..EN .WHITIS Ijaving Howard 1'aync Berry served as a' teacher and coach at Comanchc High School during the 1984-65 school year, at Floydada during the 196n-6fl year and at Lubbock Coronado during the 1066-07 year. Bcny is married and has one son. Whitis will hold the post of as- sociate professor in physical education at the university while Berry will teach in the physical educalion department. Senators Back Clear Stand In Mideast WASHINGTON (AP) A ma- jority of senators havn signed a letter lo President Nixon sup- porting "a clearly expressed policy on Ihe part of the United States to protect and defend ils intcresls" in the Middle East. They said thai course could deter the Soviet Union from risking a confrontation between the great powers ns an growlh of the conflict between Israel and the Aral; slates. Sponsors, of the Idler said more ihan 70 Senate signatures would be on it when il goes to the White. House today. NEWS INDEX Amusements 7D Bridge 4A Business Notes IOC Cloisified 4-7D Comics 3D Editoriols 2D Horoscope 5A Hospilol Potients....... 3A Obiluaries Sports............ 6.7C To Your Good Health____5C TV Leg 5B Women's By ELLIE RUCKER Baseball Umpire Not Blinded by Nepotism Q. Would you please answer (his question fnr me? Is It fair for an umpire to rail a game when he has a son playing on one of the teams? .A. It's not fair'-to his. own a conscientious -umpire will probably be narder on his 'son than, on the other team, says Jack Turner, -Abilene Little League Co- ordinator and Carroll Forrester, District 5 Little League Administrator. In Ihcir opinion any umpire will make .mistakes whether .his son is playing or not, but they've never seen an umpire INTENTIONALLY, make a bad call. They said il might be a problem if jusf anyone was'called from the sidelines lo umpire, but lhal the Liltle League umpires are from the Abilene Umpire Assn. and arc competent arid fair. Q. My wife and I are sincerely Interested In natural roods. The article In The Reporter-News Ihe other day concerning cancer-producing hormones found In American beef really made us concerned. IVc were wondering If there Is any place that beet which, has nol been Injected wilh these hormones? A. The owner of a local meat packing firm said the synthetic hormone DES isn't fed to all cattle just to heifers. To be certain you're not gelling DBS-fed beef, ask your meal market manager for steer beef. Our source said lhat Ihe harmfuuiess of DES is very controversial; he feels there's no real danger with the federal controls and safeguards lhal are now in effect.. Q. I'd like to know how lo get rid of locusts. A. Assl. County Agent Bolcman says the best and safcsl chemical is Sevin, which is an 80 per cent wettable powder. You can purchase it at nurseries and feed stores; directions for use are on the package. Or you can try John the Baptist's method of eliminating locusts he just ate Lhem (with a liltle wild For heaven's sake, if you decide to eal them, do it BEFOfiF, you spray them with Sevin because it's poisonous. We don't have any locust recipes. Could you Icll me where I could an Afglian Hound and about hew much I would have to pay? A. There's a liller available now In Abilene and anolher litter will be ready In about 2 months we've sent you information on how to contacl the owners. Our canine authority says that since Afghan Hounds are very rare, especially in Ihis part of Ihe country, you'll be lucky to find one (or under Q. I've heard that if you Iron a garment (hat's made of permanent press fabric, thai the permanent press is rcninraf. Docs Ironing harm (he anli wrinkle agent In the material? A. No. it doesn't hurt the finish, but when you're ironing be sure you don't Iron In any extra wrinkles because-they'll sure be hard to remove.' Home Demonstration Agent Roberta Walters says- the, best way to remove irnned-in wrinkles'is lo wash the garment, then put it in a dryer and the heat from the dryer should remove il. She said Ihe only wrinkles that are permanent are those that are in the fabric before il goes into the ovens at the factory. Address questions to Action Line, Box 30, Abilene, Texas Names will not be used but questions must be signed anrt addresses given. Include telephone numbers II possible, V   

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