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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: July 17, 1970 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - July 17, 1970, Abilene, Texas                                WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT GOES 90TH YEAR, NO. 31 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, FRIDAY EVENING, JULY 17, PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS (IP) lite SUNDAY Effort to Talk With the Youth Billy Graham Says He Taken Part in Pot Party By SEI1YON JOH TOKYO (AP) American evangelist Billy Graham said io- day: '.'I have taken part in a marijuana smoking party in Ihe United Stales despite criticisms against it." "I have also participated in. antiwar folksong singing rallies of leftist students to make con- with tliem and understand the reasons for their rebel- he added, "liy doing so, I found that the youth, not only of Ihe United States but also ot every other coimfry in the world, believe in many things and sometimes iheir conclusions were based on mistakes." He did not mention whether or not he himself had smoked mar- ijuana, but previous reports liave said he did not, that he merely wanted to talk with the youths at a marijuana "smoke- in" in Washington the night of July 3. Graham made the remarks at a news conference in Tokyo, where he has been since Tues- day to attend Ihe 12lh World Haplisl Congress. He will ad- dress the closing session of the week-long congress Saturday night. Graham said the youth of Ip- day, "in search lor the purpose of life, are demanding quick so- lutions to social ills which they believe Ihey were called upon to However, he said he thinks "many young people are beginning to realize the answer lies only in Christ." The American evangelist said he based his belief on his talks with people who have attended his evangelical assemblies. About 75 per cent of these, he said, were students. Graham said he was neilher for nor against the war in Viet- nam. He defended his participa- tion in the July 4 Honor Ameri- ca Day rally in Washington. He said he was invited by its sponsors, consisting of members of boln "the.hawkist arid dov- ish" ramps and including for- mer Vice President'Hubert H. Humphrey and Sen. Mike Mans- field of Montana, the Senate majority leader. not a demonstration but a meeting called to cele- brate Independence Gra- ham said, "and I believe it was a very fine thing Io inject reli- gious elements in such a nieoi- ing." Cambodian Troops Back in Kiri Rom By T. JEFF WILLIAMS Associated Press Writer PHNOM PENH, Cambodia (AI1) Cambodian army Iroops reoccupied the mountain resort of Kiri Rom Thursday after Ihe Viet Cong and Norlh Vietnamese pulled out, but new fighting was reported today 21 mites north of Plmom Penh at the Long Vek munilions depot. The Cambodian military spokesman said 'about 300 Com- munist reinforcemenls had moved inlo the Long Vek area. He said fighting there began Thursday and continued this morning, but he had no details. Long Vek was under siege (or a week last month, and Ihe gov- ernment said it cleared out the arsenal when enemy forces be- gan a buildup in the area sever- al weeks ago. Attacks on it have continued, although the enemy objective is not clear. Tire Viet Cong and North Viet- namese withdrew from the Kiri Rom plateau 50 miles west of Phnom Penh afler six days of fighting in which Ihey inflicted heavy casualties on the Cambo- dians. As they went, the Cambo- dian spokesman reported, they burned the holiday villa of Prince Norodom Sihanouk, the Toco Pete' Just Didn't Strike Out LINES OF HISTORY Edward Hard Heart, an Oglala Sioux, stopped off in Denver Wednesday to promote the upcoming Chey- enne, Wyo., Frontier Days July 21-26. Hard Heart is a member of the Oglala Sioux dancing troupe louring Colorado. (AP Wircphoto) Sheriff of Nottingham To Host 5 Robin Hoods NEW YORK of Sher- wood Forest and all that. The sheriff of Nottingham is going to have tea with five Robin Hoods. A banker, a diver, a coed, a card dealer and a named Hobin to be guests for four days at Ihe 1st Nottingham Festival in Nottingham, England. They gathered at Kennedy Airport Thursday night, trading Hohin Hood stories and gelling photographed wearing a green cap or with a quiver and bow. _________________ NEWS INDEX Amusements 15A Bridge ...............KB Ossified 9-15B Comics SB Editorials Horoscope Hospilol Patienls 3A Sports 12-HA To Your Good Heollh 7B TV Loo............. 'PA Women's News..... 2.33_____ A public relalions man from the British Tourist Authority provided Ihe latter and also the explanation: The town of Nottingham dreamed up Ihe scheme Io publicize the festival. More than 200 U.S. entranls wrote to the sheriff of Nottingham. Fifty were found Io have Robin Hood as Iheir complete and legal name. The five winners Included a senior vice president of the First Union National Bank in Marion, N. C. He said customers in the bank "just break up when they hear that name." Miss Robin Hood, 1C, of Porlage, Ind., said one problem wilh the name is that "everyone has to get Iheir chance to be funny at your expense." Robin Hood, 41, of Newark, Ohio, a deep-sea diver, said the name can be handy during job interviews. "Some- limes Ihere will be a room-full of people waiting to see about a job, and they'll call me first." Miss Robin Hood, 23, of Crystal Falls, Mich., is a college student and Robin Hood, 26, is a I-is Vegas card dealer and actor. WICHITA, Kan. (AP) Don "Taco Pete" Peters never went to high school and at the age of 37 is so crippled by multiple sclerosis that he can move noth- ing but his head. He might strike you as an un- likely prospect for success in the business world, but his ninl- to is "A guy can do anything he sets his mind to in his case, it works. Peters dropped out of school afler the eighth grade, spent some time in Ihe Army and lat- er went to work in the construct- ion industry. By 1960 he had de- veloped advanced symptoms of multiple hardening of the became to- tally disabled in 1965 at the age of 32. But with the help of his family and- friends he has developed a chain of restaurants called "Taco Pete." The Taco is a Mexican sandwich based on a Nixon is one of its the res- taurant motlo is "South of the border food in north of the bor- der slyle." The restaurants are in Wichi- ta Dotlgc City. Pitlsburg and Arkansas City, Kan., and Tulsa, Okla. Peters opened the first in 1967 with an investment ot only "We saved a lol.of he explains, "by doing every- thing our own places, building and reno- vating equipment, even making up our own insignia and broc- hures." Peters depends on his wife, [tfarge, and friends to write down or sketch his ideas, to try Market Gains NEW YORK (AP) Slock prices scored sharp gains today in moderate trading. Advancing issues led losers more than 3 to 1. out his new recipes, and even Io bathe, dress, shave and feed him. His specially designed home has ramps instead of stairs and other features to make move- ment for his wheel chair easier. He visits each restaurant reg- ularly, traveling in a small van. ".Sometimes I lake the family wilh me on these he says. The family includes three daughters, Dcbby, 12, Diana, 10, and Kathy, 5. Peters starts his day wilh three hours of therapy, then en- ters the van to attend meetings with plumbers, carpenters, franchisers and managers in Ihe operation of the business which now employes about 150 people and is worth several hundred thousand dollars in property alone. Gunshot Death 'Self-Inflicted' Melvin Cannon Jr., 38, of 2534 Simmons, was found shot to death early Thursday in his up- slairs apartment, a .16 gauge shotgun neraby. Justice of the Peace Roland Dunwody, wh9 pronounced the man dead at the scene about a.m., said he .would rule "death by gunshot wound, self- inflicted." He said Cannon was shot in the face. Funeral arrangemenls are pending at Norlh's Funeral Home. The body was discovered by Cannon's downstairs neighbor, Thomas L. Claxton, wilh whom Cannon had visited until about I a.m. Claxlon said he discovered Cannon had left his glasses in his apartment, and when he sought to return after 7 a.m., he found the body on the floor. deposed chief of stale, and other buildings. The enemy force Ihat overran Kiri Rom last Saturday had been estimated at men, and Ihe government mustered between and Iroops to retake it. But it appeared lhal the enemy abandoned the HlUe resort town before the Cambo- dians could close in. II was believed the enemy force .withdrew westward along the Cardamom mountain chain which has long been under the control of Communist forces. The Kiri Rom plateau is al the southeast end of the range. Meanwhile, South Vietnamese President Nguyen Van Thicu flew to Neak 1-uong, in Cambo- dia 35 miles of Phnoni Penh, to visit Soul h Vietnamese Ironps there and In talk joint strategy wilh Cambodian Pre- mier Nol. It was their first meeting. Newspaper, reports In Bang- kok today told of joint opera- tions by Thai border police and Cambodian forces against Viet Cong troops on the Cambodian side of the border. The accounts said one Thai policeman and a Viet Cong were killed, eight Thais were wounded and three were missing in two clashes this week. Thai military officials re- fused to comment on Ihe reporls or on older reporls that Thai.air force planes were attacking Viet Cong and North Vietnamese forces near Angkor Wat. In South Vietnam, North Viet- namese reinforcemenls were re- porled moving into tlie norlhern part of the country, and the U.S. command sent up scores of B52 bombers in an effort to slow down Ihe buildup. Some 50 of the big, eight-jet bombers pounded infiltration corridors, base camps and stag- ing areas in border areiis of Laos and Cambodia and in South Vietnam, informed sources in Saigon said. 'AHOY TEACHER' Nevatta Hunter, 3, of Denver is a student in tlie speech pathology class at Children's Hos- pital in Denver. The active youngster amused herselE with a small cardboard cylinder during a recent class. Nevalta has hearing aid units on each ear, the leather straps over her shoulclres contain the batteries. (AP W i r ephoto) _ _____ _ Girt Found In Chicago Hotel CHICAGO (API Ail 18- year-old girl attending a con- venlion was found slabbed to death early today in a down- town hotel, and a roommale was seriously wounded. Police said Evelyn Okubo, 18, of Stocklnn, Calif., was found dead in Ihe bathtub of her room at the Palmer House will! her hands and feet tied behind her. The young woman's throat had been slashed and she liad been stabbed in the abdomen, offi- cers said. The second girl, Carol Yama- da, 17, also of Stockton, was rushed to Henrotin Hospilal where she was reported in poor condition. Police said her throat also had been slashed, and she also was found bound hand and foot. The victims were discovered by anotfier roommale, Palti E. Iwataki, IB, of San Jose, Calif., when she returned to Ihcir room on the seventh floor of Hie hotel after visiting friends elsewhere in the building. All three girls, members of Prince Charles Sees Capital by Moonlight By FRANCES I.EWINE Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP) Visit- ing Prince Charles viewed the nation's capital by moonlight on his first day In the United Stales and left all of his touring parly but a game David Eisenhower behind to walk down 8M steps inside the Washington Monu- ment. David later admitted it was "heavy going al while the Princess Anne, Julie EisenPiower and Tri- cia opted for an clc- valor down. "We were Julie ex- Who's Supposed to Cut Limbs? By ELME RUCKEP. Q. Will you please tell me who's snpposed to cut Ihe Mmbs? The trees belong to people next door on (heir properly, hut the limbs are rubbing against my roof and my house. Arc Ihey supposed to trim the trees? Or am I? A. The trees are the responsibility of ynur neighbor since Ihcy'rc on his property. Assl. City Attorney Jeff Lewis suggest that you first talk wilh your neighbors about cutting the limbs, then if Ihey iSfusc, talk Io a lawyer, he can file a suit requiring Ihe tree limbs to be cut. Lewis advises that you nnt go onto the neighbor's property to cut the limbs yourself, as this would be trespassing. Q. If a young man serves his time In Ihe service and afler he out Js hurl In an accident, Is hospitalized and then unable to work for Ihe rest of his life, cutilrf he get help from the Volcrans Administration or (he Social Security? If so wlio do you sec about It? A. If he's no longer able to work, he's eligible for Social Security benefits, just as though he. suddenly became 65 years old. Contact the S.S. office at 677-5262. If he's totally and permanently disabled, he's also eligible for a V.A. "non-service pension" and care in a V.A. hospital. Call the V.A. at 677- 4701. Q. Potently a bird built a nest In our tree. My qnesllon Is what do I feed II? I've seen bird seed In stores, bit Is tbat the right kind to feed a wild bird? A. If you can convince your dog to share with a hungry bird, the best bird feed is dog food. All insect eating birds will thrive on It. Tf you think the bird is Ihirsty, Zoo Director Dan Walson suggests you should add a lilllc water to the dog food; don't use an eye dropper because you're likely Io get water in its windpipe, Q. Is family consoling available In Ahllonc? A. There's a lot of consoling done in Ihe Editorial Dept. of The Rtporter-News, so come on up anytime. Now if you meant family counseling, call the rifenlal Health Office at 677-B271, Ihey act as a referral service and can probably find someone for you. Also look irider Marriage Family Counselors in Ihe phone book. Address questions Io Action Uw, Box 30, Abilene, Texas 79M4. Names Will not be used but questions must be signed and addresses gives. Please Include teleptoae lumbers If possible. "lained laughingly of the Thurs- day night experience. The prince also occupied the spollighl earlier in the busy day at Camp David, Md. His shoot- ing prowess dazzled the Nixon family and a skect range opcra- lor when he scored Ihree dou- bles in a row during a shoaling exhibition. The royal youngsters and President Nixon's daughters and son-in-law appeared to be getting along well at tlie outset of the three-day private visit of the prince and first to the United Stales. "They were applauded by.a crowd of about a thrais-ind gath- ered at Ihs steps of Ihe Lincoln Memorial when Ihey slpoped there during an hour-long night lour by presidential limousine. Blonrfa Princess Anne sur- prised observers by appearing Io he aloof and unsmiling much of Ihe time she was publicly vis- ible. _ When a reporter asked how she liked the view al Ihe Wash- ington Monument, she sakl: "I don't give interviews." Once or twice, she, loo, slopped to chat with tourists, aliing wilh the mars gregarious prince. To a group of three youngsters, who waved a Vir- ginia colonial flag at the Lincoln Memorial steps, the princess stopped for a greeting and said: "Ywi're a bit laic for bed, aren't you." the Junior Japanese-American Citizens League, were in Chica- go attending the 21st.-biennial National Japanese-American Citizens League convention at Hie hotel. LHfie Ruled Viel Victim Mr. and Mrs. W.-D. Little of 750 Ross have been notified that their son, S. Sgt. Danny Little, 23, was illed m action in Vietnam April 23, 1970. A board of officers in Vielnam has declared Sgl. Liltle 'dead with no remains, according to Major Glendon Hanna, com- manding officer of Armed Forces-Examining and Enlranco Service here. The report slates that Sgt. Little was on a combat opera- lion when hostile forces were en- countered. Previously his status was listed as missing in action and Ihe status of killed in action was based on Ihe [indings of the board of officers convened In Vielnam which Investigated the circumslances surrounding his missing status. Maj. Hanna said that the investigation revealed that Sgt. Little and other members of his unit were approaching an enemy hunker complex when they re- ceived weapon fire from hostile forces. Sgt. Little was mortally wounded and due to the heavy volume of enemy fire the others were forced to retire and leave his remains. The report also said (fiat those pesonnel near him at the lime slated that Sgt. Liltle expired before they were forced to retire and that in spile of search efforts on several occasions his remains have never been located. Sgt. Little was with Co. B, Detachment B-20, 5th Special Forces Group and was serving his second tour in Vietnam. He was born Sept, 21, IMfi, in Abilene and attended Abilene public schools. He graduated from the San Marcos Baplist Academy and attended Me- Murry College before entering the service Sept. 13, 1964. He was a member of the Baplist church. Survivors include his parents and one brother, James Lillle of 3357 S: 7th. WEATHER U.S. DEPARTMENT OP COMMERCE ES5A WEATHER BUREAU LkVej-fer Map, Pg. 4 A) ABILENE AND VICINITY (JO-mlla rJdluj) Parlly cloudy Ip clear Friday and wilh a Wgh Ecin aflernoonj in .he miff Ki wiih a kw The lower 70s, Winds from Iho wulh ilVjh.and low Icr 14'hours wdfro 9' fl.m: H and 70. Hpg.i and low-lar uma dais Laii ytar: 101 and 77, Jiwiset I ail riJahL- Br46 PJTI, SuruiM. totfdy; ArU a.m. (ooFohu p.m.   

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