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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: July 3, 1970 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - July 3, 1970, Abilene, Texas                                "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT flOTH YEAR, NO. 17 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79G04, FRIDAY EVENING, JULY 3, PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS Associated Press (IP) Ktc SUNDAY Man Sees Total Black Now' Last thing he remembers seeing was cherry bomb.. .fence KALAMAZOO, Mich. (AP) II was (he Fourth of July, 1966. The last tiling David Shue re- members seeing was "a red cherry bomb nn the ground and a wooden fence." Then there was a blast. "I sec total black now. It's called a slone Shuc says. Shue, 20, was blinded by the explosive at a family celebra- tion of Independence Day in his hometown of St. Joseph, Mich. "There were about 15 people around the yard, lighting fire- works, being very cautious. I was 16, one of the older ones, so 1 was supervising and showing the kids how to set them Shue recalls. He set a cherry rornb in the grass toward the end o[ the evening. "I was kneeling and it was nn the ground to my right, about an arm's length away." "I touched it with a sparkler. I didn't have any time to turn my head away or get my hand out of there. I stood lip and there was all this liquid pouring down my face and my shirt." He was driven to a hospital. Shuc was in surgery five hours ami in the hospital 22 days, nuclei- heavy sedation, with a 24-hour attendant. His weight dropped from 195 to 135. Doctors didn't lell him he would be totally blind until two months alter Ilie accident. He spent 16 weeks al Boston's Catholic Guild for All the Blind learning "how to walk with n while cane, typing, braille, cooking, ironing clothes, how lo make clay figures nutl fencing. Fencing increases your sense nl touch with a cano." He dropped out of Western Michigan University last year because debris from the cherry bomb explosion "slarlcd coming out of one eye so I needed sur- gery." He plans in re-enlci' Western next fall to prepare to become a psychiatric social worker- He was married June 6 and sings with a rock band to sup- port himself and his bride. "No matter how.careful you he says of July 4-four years ago, "you can get hurl. I was being very careful. H was just one of those freakish things." UC Cl I .5. Ship Hijackers Find Fate Not Kind McKay, Glatowski In Cambodia Prison IT'S A 'HUMBLING GAME fellow who said-golf, is a humbling game probably didn't have this in mind'. In spite the teenager played out his round in the Charlotte, N.C., Jaycce Junior Golf Tournament. (AP Wirephoto) Evangelistic Youth Stage Fort Worth Night Parade FORT .WORTH (AP) An estimated youths marched up Main Street Thursday night as a climax lo the first night of the "Youth Evangelism Con- ference" ol the Baptists of Tex- as. The youths marched from the Convention Center nine blocks lo the courthouse, where street lights were dimmed while Ihe young people waved flashlights and sang hymns. The crowd estimate was made by Dr. Wade Freeman, director of evangelism for Texas Bap- lisls. The youths carried placards, some of them saying, "Turn on with "Get High with and "A Christian Revolu- tion." William B. rogue, support crewman for the coming Apollo 14 moon flight, led Ihe marchers. "Something phenomenal is lak- place here Poguc commented. "This is more impressive than a Saturn leav- ing the Cape Before Ihe parade, the youths heard Cliff Barrows of the Billy Graham Evangelistic team and Debbie Patlon of Odessa, Miss Teen-Age America of Bolh speakers told the young people that there is one way lo peace through Christ. Harrows said that "the philo- sophy and outlook on life is re- fleeted in the songs youths sing. It is particularly true today. Our sings often reflect1 a philnsphy of dispair, doom, frustration, loneliness and an emptiness of life." Barrows, who is Graham's di- rcclor of music, said also that "psychiatrists list Hie 10 basic needs of man as love, security, importance, response, recogni- tion, purpose, belonging, free- dom from guilt, new experience, and approval. "These have been Ihe basic needs of mankind through his- lory and the problems you and I are facing today are not new." By T. JEFF WILLIAMS Associated Press Writer PHNOM PENH (AP) More than three months alter hijack- ing an American munitions ship to Cambodia, self-styled revolu- tionaries Clyde McKay and Al- vin Glalowski wish they were behind the Iron Curtain. Anywhere but Cambodia. Fate has not been kind to ths two young Americans who staged the hijacking of Ihe U.S. freighter, Columbia Eagle in mid-March. Instead of being welcomed with open arms by a left-leaning government, they have been jailed by ;hc rightist leaders who toppled Prince No- rodom Sihafiouk, former chief of stale. The pair arrived in Cambodia March 15, just three days before Sihanouk was overthrown. Mc- Kay and Cilalnwski are now housed with other political pris- oners on a heat-drenched prison ship and they wanl nothing more than lo gel away. During 'a long interview with Ihcm this week al Ihe Cambo- dian naval base where they are held, the two asked several times lo have a Russian corre- spondent or diplomats from the Soviet or Polish embassies In come and help arrange their new asylum. "We want lo leave Camhodia. There is nothing we can do from where we are now. I Just can't Psychiatrist Makes On Gl Health Insurance Plan Reporter-News Business Office Closed July 4th So that our employees may celebrate Ihe 4lh, the Roporter- business office will remain closed Saturday. Saturday and Sunday editions will be published as usual. Classified Ad Deadlines Please turn in your classified display and line ads to run Sat- urday, Sunday and Monday by 4 P.M. Friday, July 3rd. If You Miss Your Paper If you should mis! your Saturday paper, coll 673-4271, circu- lation department and one will be de- livered lo your home. By JIM ADAMS Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP) A San Diego psychiatrist made on a GI .health insur- ance program in 1D68, a House subcommittee reported today, and the military didn'l look into the payments until nudged by Congress. The panel said Ihe Pentagon finally reported back last month lhal all the fees had been ruled earned except for which Ihe unnamed psychiatrist refunded. The House service benefits subcommittee headed by Rep. James A. Bymc, D-Pa., charged no wrongdoing but said il "was concerned aboul the long delay in determining the propriety of such payments" and recommended the Pentagon revise ils procedures lo keep a current review of Ihe fees it pays. The recommendation was made in a report on (he mili- tary's Civilian Health and Med- ical Program of Ihe Uniformed Services CHAMPUS which provides care for military fami- lies. ___ "WEATHER U 5 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ESSA WEATHER BUKEAU (WcJlhtr M -13Q) ABILENE AND VICINITY (tt-mlle rAdiui) Fair and warm 1oday, ard ialurday, timing Cooler Saturday rJghl. High holh allprrnons artwd lonioM near 73. WMs sou I her ly 1-10 The Pentagon reportedly lold (he subcommittee the psychia- trist worked 12 lo 14 hours a day and had records showing he had earned the average a day he received. The payments work out to (hat average if he worked six days a week. The overpayment, a subcommittee aide said, was the result of poor bookkeeping. The is tr.e highest known income by a single doc- tor from any federal health in- surance program in California in 1961) and one of the highest in the country. The Associated Press, which disclosed high medicare ami Medicaid payments last year, listed as Ihe highest in California lhal year. A Detroit osteopath's clinic gol in Medicaid pay- ments then and a Miami osteo- path got roughly in medicare payments. The House subcommittee said 8fl doctors around Ihe country gol or more in 1968 from the military CHAMPUS pro- gram and the military still has no figures for I960. walk down the street and go away. We arc prisoners, And if the United Slates attempts In extradite as, I don't know what we'll said tall, brown-eyed Clyde McKay, Z5, of Esc6ndido, Calif. If the United States did man- age lo extradite there is no extradition treaty at present and Glalowski would almost certainly stand trial for mutiny and hijacking. The captain of the Columbia Eagle, which was loaded with napalm and hound for Thailand when hijacked, has publicly rec- ommended the ivro be tried-and face the death penalty for their act. Alvin Glalowski, 20, Long Beach, has long blond hair falling over his blue eyes, hunched forward on his chair when he heard this. "If we go back lo the Stales we won't gel a trial. They won't give us a he said. But Ihe Iwo don't plan lo re- turn lo Ihe United States. Gla- lowski, who likes lo wear a black beret, said "the only way lo go back is with a gun. I'll go back lo participate in a guerril- la war." McKay, who directed the takeover, takes a less extreme position: "If Ihe United Slates gels me, they will sentence me lo death or al least make life not worth living, f wo'n'l go back until the present form of government in the United States is over- Ihrown." Whatever the resulls If the two should be sent back to the United States, they believe themselves committed to a re- voluionary life. NEWSlNDEX Arruscmcnls........1 I A Bridge................3A Clossified...........9-I3B Comics 8B Editorials..............6B Horcrtccpr? 3A Hospilol Polrenls....... 13B Obituaries.............2A Sports 13-ISA To Your Good Heallh____3A TV Log.............. I 2A Women's News........2.3B "1 ani a Marxist. 1 believe the Marxist way of said Mc- Kay. Glalowski chimed In: "Yes, I do, Ion. You know, 'political power grows rrom Ihe barrel of a gun.'" McKay silenced him wilh a wave of his hand and said "not that Marxist." JIcKay, who said lie once spent [nnr months wilh Ihe French Koreigu Legion in Soma- lia added: "It's not a new life thai the Columbia Ecgle lakc- nvor had rnmmillwl us to. It was one wo. bad accepted before. I had planned such acts many times." IT'S OKAY, HUT WIIKRK'S THE ACTION Tommy Flenniken seems to he impaticnlly awaiting the rwlco action (luring the Thursday afternoon parade which preceded rodeo action at the Stamford Cowboy Reunion. Tommy is currently visiting his grand- father, Clyde Bigham of Tuscola. Reunion story, picture, Pg. 1-B. (Staff Photo by Billy Adams) ___________ NE What Is Legal Age for Marriage Here? a.m.: -rwjrs endirvg lame period i And low for 96 nntf tf. and row [or ycflr: ?7 and H. Sunrcl I flit night; p.m.; a.m.; Ifrnlghl p.m. By KU.1K ItUCKKR and BICTTY CRISSOM Q. Will you please slate (he legal ages and requirements for marriage licenses in Ihe states of Texas, New Mexico and Oklahoma? I understand some of Ihe laws were changed retTnlly and would like to know what the law Is now. A. In Texas (he legal age for marriage wilh the consent of parcnls is Ifi for men and 14 for women; ivilhoiil consent it's 19 for men and 18 for women. A blood lest is required but there isn't a waiting period before or after obtaining Ihe license. In New Mexico a blond test is also required and a three-day wailing period for Ihe license. Wilh parenls' consent, a man of 18 and a woman of 16 may marry; without consenl he must be 21 and Ihe woman 18. The Oklahoma laws require a man lo 18 and a woman to be 15 lo marry with consent of the parents hul consenl isn'l needed if he is 21 and she is 18. If eilher is under 21, (here is a 72-hour waiting period. Q. Mow should a housewife dispose nf accumulated kitchen fals hacnn drippings, nils from frying fish, etc.? A. There are several ways of disposing of leftover fal. fl may be poured down the disposal with other foods, bill use COLD water, says Mrs. Jack Orr, home economist. Or simply pul it in a can or jar with a lid and throw it in the trash can. II can be used for seasoning vegetables, greasing potatoes baking, etc. Another suggestion Is to pour it over dried dog food to make it tastier (for the dog) and make his coat glossy. Q. Would It he for Jflii In lind information on where buy an Ineinen- slvc grandfather clock aid a wagon wheel, My husband's parents will be visiting ns soon from Ohio since they collect antiques we weuld like to gel those Items before Ibey arrive. A. A wagon wheel wouldn't he impossible lo find but an INEXPENSIVE grandfather clock is "somelhin1 else-." The antique dealers lell us most grand- father clocks arc quite expensive. There are a few dealers listed in (lie yellow pages under antiques lhal have wagon wheels imst of Ihe time. We'll send you the names of Ihe places that usually carry wrgon wheels. Q. I read In your column where a man was searching for a "log for splitting limner. The reason you couldn't find II Is probably hccan.sc lhal piece of equipment Is called a "powder mall." My hKsband has used one and II fits the description you printed on the "log gun." Have lhal man call us and we can tell him whore In find a used one and also a new one. A. No wonder we were having problems wilh thai "log gun." II had the Lumber- man's Assn. and the Texas Forestry Assn. slumped, loo. 11 never fails, our deepest mysteries are usually solved by an alert reader. Thanks. Q. How did originate? A. Prnhah'y began among Ihe Chaldeans who lived thousands of years ago in Ihe region around Ihe Persian Gulf. Chaldean astrology, like that of the Hahylonians, was based the hchavinr of the sun, the moon and the five planets which were known in those ancient times. The aslrological lore ol Ihe region was so famous that the very name Chaldean and Babylonian came to mean aslrolngor. Q. What Is a grass widow and a sod widnw? Why arc they called grass or sod widows? A. Sod means covered with grass; therefore, a sod widow is one who has lost her husband by death. A grass .widow.Is a woman who is separated, divorced or lives nparl from her husband. Origin of the.'terni, grass widow, is uncertain.   

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