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Abilene Reporter News: Thursday, July 2, 1970 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - July 2, 1970, Abilene, Texas                                gbflene "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT 90TH YEAR, NO. 16 .PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, THURSDAY EVENING, JULY 2, PAGES IN FOUR SECTIONS Associated Prt'ii SUNDAY Israelis Hit CHIP OFF THE DORMAN BLOCK Frederick Borman, right, processing. The younger Borman is following in the footsteps 18-year-old son of astronnut Frank Borman salutes an upper of his famous father who graduated "the Point" in 1950. (AP classman Wednesday as he and other incoming fresh- Wirephoto) men arrive at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point for Nixon Says Bruce Will Have New Instructions in Paris By ELLIE RUCKER and BF7ITY GR1SSOM How Do You Recid R-N Line Score? Q. As an Interested parent of a little league hall player, I would like lo know how lo read a line st'ors in The Report- er News. A. All numbers before the dash mean the number of runs scored in each inning. The first number after Ihe dash is the lotal runs scored. Second number after the dash is Ihe team's total hits, and Ihird is number of errors. Top line is the visiting team and Ihe second line is the home team. First names listed before the semicolon are the pitchers and catchers of Ihe visiting team, the names afler the semicolon are Hie home pitchers and catchers and the number in parentheses is the inning that pitcher or catcher entered the game. Pitchers arc listed before the catchers are listed alter the "and." "W" means winning pitcher and "L" means losing pitcher. HR, of course, means home run. Q. When will sewing lesspns start at the AduK llomemaking Center on South llth SI.? Are (here any night classes and what Is the charge? What young adult activities are .going to be held this summer? A. Ncxl classes will he held the first Tuesday in September alter Labor Day. There is one night class on Tuesday evening from 7 to 9 p.m. and all classes are free. The Young Homemakers Club will not meet until September except for a few socials, and any polcnlial member is welcome to altend. Information may be oblained by calling the Adull Center. Q. What arc the advantages of having a Posl Olllce box? Aflcr you answer (via the post office) I'll ask you another quesllon In that regard later. A. Post Office box deliveries are marie three limes a day starling at a.m. Air- mail coming in later in the clay is boxed hut it wouldn't be delivered unlil the next day lo a residence- Twenty-four hour pick up is available and change of address isn't necessary if moving within the city. If the mail isn't picked up for several days it's automatically held in the post office box and isn't exposed to the public. Nexl question, please. Q. I have heard of several methods by the American Indians In (he manufaclnre of arrowheads. K Ihcre Is an Indian expert or even an expert Indian around could you please find out how they did It? A. Most slone artifacts were flaked by Iwo techniques: percussion and pressure. The percussion technique was used for larger pieces such as axe blades, scrapers, and choppers. The flint, chert, or similar roalcrial was slruck obliquely by another piece of hard stone. By carefully changing the angle and point of impact, subsequent chipping would produce a sharp implement. The pressure technique involved the use of an antler or bone tool pressed firmly against the flint to remove small chips. Repeated, this produced smaller objects, such as the thin bladed arrow points. Sometimes heat was used lo break off large chunks from boulders. Address questions lo Action Unc, Box 30, Ahllenc, Texas 7KW. Names will nol be used hu( questions mist he signed and addresses given, rlease Include telephone lumbers If possible. By DOUGLAS B. CORNELL Associated Press Writer LOS ANGELES (AP) Pres- ident Nixon has strongly defend- ed the Cambodia operation while naming a new U.S. nego- tiator .Paris :talks' on'ending the. Vietnam war. David K.E; "one of America's most distinguished Nixon said in an hour television-radio Interview Apartment Price Near Million Jordan Kirshenbaum o f Cranston, R.I., has purchased the Elmwood Manor Apartments complex in Abilene for slightly under million. Kirschenbaum, who also owns apartment complexes In Wichita Falls, Fremont, -Neb., and in New Jersey, was the successful bidder in Ihe sale of the property held by the FHA in Washington, D. C., May 20. Six other bids were submitted. Kirschenbaum was in Abilene this week to arrange for operation of the apartment complex. Mrs. Ruby who has served as manager of the apartments for the past H months, will continue in that position, Klmwood Manor Apartments consists of 136 units, wilh four units to a building, in a tract bordered by Leggetl and Lexington and on both sides of S. 7lh. Wednesday lake over the post vacated by Henry Cabot Lodge Jr. last December. disclosing any new peace formula; .Nixon said Bruce "will he in a position with .his new'.instructions', to. tell Ihe opposition! .that we are willing lo we can narrow Ihe gap between their position and ours." Bruce, 72, a Maryland native and lifelong Democrat, has served under five presidents in- cluding ambassadorships to France, Germany and Great Britain. He will go to Paris by the first of August. Indochina was the prime lopic and the Mideast secondary as Nixon underwent a quizzing from three network panelists in his first public appearance since the June 30 pull-out of U.S. ground forces from Cambodia. On the Mideast, Nixon por- trayed the Arab-Israeli conflict as potentially more dangerous than Southeast Asia because It has the possibility of a big war wilh the Soviets and Americans on opposite sides. He said Ihe United States would not allow the military balance lo shift against Israel. But it was on his controversial decision to send U.S. troops into Cambodia April 30 lhat Nixon waged his most vigorous de- quickly started drawing a rebuttal from congressional critics. With a swipe at the Senate's Tuesday vote to bar the Presi- Market Higher NEW YORK (AP) The stock market opened slightly higher today in moderate trad- ing. Advances held an early lead of nearly 2 to 1 over declines. dent from sending .U.S. forces back into Cambodia, he de- clared: "As Commander-in-chief, I had no 'choice bul lo act lo de- fend those; men (the Americans in neighboring South "If I am faced with thai deci- sion again, I will exercise that power lo defend those men. It will be done." Nixon rated the two-irionlh U.S. foray against enemy sanc- tuary areas inside the Cambo- dian border as "Ihe most deci- sive action in terms of damag- ing the enemy's ability to wage effective warfare that has oc- curred in Ihis war to date." He also said "Cambodia's chances of surviving as a neu- tral country are infintely better SM NIXON, Pg. 7A By MICHAEL GROSS Associated Press Writer TEL AVIV (AP) Israeli planes attacked antiair- crafl missile naileries al Ihe soul hem end of the Suez Canal today and other targets along Ihe walerway, the Israeli miii- lai-y command announced. A spokesman said the planes also raided "war largels" along (he northern coasts of the Gulf of Suez. All planes returned safely, he reported, bul lie gave no india- tion of what hits Ihey scored. One of the chief purposes o[ the daily Israeli raids across the canal has been lo knock out the SAM2 launching sites which the Russians have been establishing along Ilie canal for Ihe Egyp- tians. The Israeli command ad- milled earlier Ihis week that. SAM2's brought down two Israe- li planes on TY.esd.ay. On Israel's eastern frontier, Arab gunners in Jordan fired rockels at two seHlemenls in Ihe Jordan Valley but caused no casualties, Ihe command in Tel Aviv said. A spokesman said the fire was returned. Diplomats at United Nalions headquarters in New York said there arc indications lhat the Soviet Union and the United Stales have moved closer lo. gether on how to settle the Arab-Israeli.conflict. sources said Wednesday thai countries recently made, proposals iridi- -eating they had softened their requirements for a Middle East peace scUloment. The sources said Ihe Russians WEATHER U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ESSA WEATHER BUREAU (Wellher map, P9. Ml ABILENE AMD VICINITY (W-mllt radiui) Fair aivd r-ot'kxfay, kmlgM and Friday. Ktch both flflcrnocru near 100. Low lonioM armir.d IS. Wind! llghl and southerly. High anrf low for ho'jrs ending al 9 a.m.: and 71. and tew period Pall 97 and 73. Sunsel 135! nlqnl: p.m.; lunrlie lodav: a.m.; suntcl larjghl: S-.yi p.m. now propose formal Arab mitments to peace" becoming; elective following Ihe first'. phase of Israeli withdrawal Irom Hie Arab territories pied in Ihe June I9G7 war. Tile U.S. proposal calls on Is-, rael lo sellle for permanent boundaries lhat would be the same "in principle" as the pre- war Arab-Israeli lines, the sources said. The Arabs have been insisting on complete Israeli withdrawal from Ihe occupied territories, and the Israelis have besn de- manding direct negotiations based on Arab recognition of Is- rael as a state. and Soviet diplomats have been trying to reach an ac- Militants Spur Clashes in Ireland By COMN FROST Associated Press Writer BELFAST, Northern Ireland (AP) About militanl Protestants paraded without in- cident through Belfast Wednes- day night, but another march 40 miles away touched off minor balding between Pioteslants and Catholics. A British army spokesman implied lhat the disorders in the lown of Coalisland were insti- gated by members of the out-, lawed Irish Republican Army. "Known IltA men were seen in the the spokesman said. "It proves who is behind the riots." The rival religious factions hurled rocks, bottles and other missiles al each olher and at British troops and local police firing tear gas. Four policemen, a soldier and several civilians were Injured, and 10 persons were arresled. The IRA, an extremist group that-vows to reunify Ireland-by force if necessary, is oullawed in holh British-ruled Northern Ireland and in the Irish Republ- ic lo the south. In Belfast, members of the Protestant Orange Order held four marches peacefully under Ihe watchful eyes of 700 British troops. It was a dress re- hearsal for the annual parade July 13 lo celebrate the ,17lh century Protestant defeat of Catholic troops al the Battle of Boyne. The big parade last year touched off Catholic-Pro- lestant warfare lhat raged for weeks. Belfast, Ixjndonderry and oth- er lowns in Northern Ireland have been Ihe "scene of disorders since Friday, when Catholic leader Bernadetle Devlin was Jailed for six months for her part In the riots last summer. The arniy said several IRA men were spotted during last week- end's street battles In'Bclfast in which six persons were killed and more than 200 wounded. CAUTIOUS BATHER A Cambodian Army soldier, on his way lo his evening bath in Kompong Speti, Cambodia, carries his pistol tucked into the back of his sarong. Earlier in the day his unit had clashed wilh an enemy force which tried to infiltrate the 30 miles southwest of Phnom I'cnh. Kompong Speu sits on a vital road linking the capital with the port of Kompong Som, formerly Sihanoukville. (AP: Wirephoto) ceplabie compromise al Ihe Big Kour. talks', in New York and at S -talk's- in Washington. The talks in-both cities center on'the resolution1 approved by the'U.N. Security Council on Nov. which calls tor settlement 6f- Ih'e "1967 war wilh a "just and lasting peace" on-.Israeli withdrawal from occupied Arab territories and Arab acknowledgement of Israeli sovereignty within recog- nized boundaries. The Russians had been asking the Americans how they inter- preted "recognized bounda- and the Americans were asking Ihe Russians how they interpreted a "stale of diplomatic sources said. Winfield S. James Dies; Rites Pending Winficlrt S, James, 87, of 842 Amarillo, father of New York Daily News president Winfield II. James, and district director for the Works Progress Administration during the 1930's, died Thursday al a.m. in West Texas Medical Center. Funeral services are pending with Elliott's Funeral Ilome. Mr. .lames was appointed district director; of .the federally administered-'WPA -during the depression on July 13, '1935, 37 days after Ihe project was Begun to provide work for men and women in building and repair of highways, renovation and construction of public buildings and special projects. During Mr. James two years as head of the 13 county district, he supervised projects in Abilene which included improvement to sewer mains, building of additional water mains, work on Cobb Park construction of Lincoln School walk way and work on Phanlom Lake. The WPA also did extensive work in regrading and raising take Abilene dam at Buffalo Gap. Area projects which Mr. James guided work on were Ihe building of an athletic field at Brcckenridge, construction of a gym at Snyder, extension of a sewor main in H a m I i n, construclinn of a school auditorium at Hanger and extensive work on the Sweelwater Municipal Airport and the Cisco fish hatchery. Mr. James was born Jan. 7, 1883 in College Station, where his family was slaying with his uncle, the second president of Texas John G. James, while his father was out west. He allcnrted school in Sherman and graduated from Rcnnylear Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York, wilh a degree in engineering. He married Lucy Heath at her home, Cradle Poinl, Va. Dec. 8, 1317 and the couple moved to WINFIELD S. JAMES headett area WPA Abilene in 1327 where Mr. James was an independent real estate operator. During World War II, he was connected with National Bank and then returned to real estate. He retired about eight years ago. His son, Winfield H. James is a graduate of Mass. Institute of Technology- He joined the New York Daily News immediately after his graduation and, except for a period of.war service, has been there since then. Mr. James was a member of Ihe Heavenly Rest Episcopal Church. NEWS INDEX Amusements- 6B Bridge 5C Business Notes IOC Comics 3D Editorials 2D Horoscope 4C Hospital Palienls 3A Obiluories Sports 8-9C To Your Good Heallh TV Log................6C Women's News.........3B Call for Women's Equality Supported by Negro Solon By JOHN W. BECKLER Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP) Male politicians depend on to win elections bul being a wom- an is as great a political handi- cap as being black, says a Ne- gro congrcsswoman. Rep. Shirley Chisholm, a Dem- ocral from New York City, told a House subcommittee Wednes- day lhat wilhoul women's cf- fnrls no man could be eleclcd to Congress. "Without his thousands o[ women volunlecrs the American party system would not Mrs. Chisholm said. "It would break down in a confusion of un- answered loiters, unmade phone calls, unkcpl appointments, un- wrillcn speeches, and unheld meetings." Mrs. Chisholm, n Negro, was one of several witnesses to lesli- fy before a subcommittee head- ed by Rep. Edith Green, sponsor of legislation calling on Ihe government lo xdisctuMirtatidn'.-. as'.-xilv-Jms'.-! Mrs. Frankie M. Freeman, who is a member of the U.S. commission on Civil Rights and a Negro, said discrimination against racial minorities "makes the burden of female slalus seem paltry in compari- son." But jMrs. Chisholm said sex discrimination is just as degrad- ing, indefensible and Infuriating as discrimination because of race, and both must be elimi- nated lo produce a just society. "Blacks and women have both been taught from childhood because our society is run by and for white lhat they are inherently she said. "To keep them in Iheir place, Ihe same characteristics are imputed lo women as lo blacks Ihey are more childish, emotional and Irresponsible than men, that they are of lower Intelligence than men'V'that they need protection, lhat Ihey are happiest; In. routine, .undemand; Ihal'-lh'eylaCtc'am-'-   

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