Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: June 26, 1970 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - June 26, 1970, Abilene, Texas                                porter "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT Byron r i iii i j 90TH YEAR, NO. 10 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, FRIDAY EVENING, JUNE 26, PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS Associated Pros lOc SUNDAY RIDING HIGH Ricky Micldlcbrook has a high perch as he vides an early-clay bicycle in (he Albany parade Thursday afternoon which kicked off the second week of the Fort Griffin Fandangle. He is flanked by other s in old-time garb. See story and another picture on Pg. 1-B. (Staff photo by Billy ._____ Jet Crash Claims 4 SAN ANTONIO, Tex. (AP) An engine failure sent a Navy jet trainer plane crashing into two houses and caused lour deaths Wednesday night. About a dozen other persons suffered injuries but only four stayed in hospitals overnight. Police said a report of a fifth death in the liery crash proved in error. Navy officials said the V9 Cou- gar jet was making a practice instrument approach to Kelly Air Force Base when it lost power and nosedived twn miles norlh of the runway. It hit in Southwest 41st Street on Ihe city's west side and bounded on- to two homes on Luz Avenue, burning bolh. Ed King, 16, silting outside with several friends, said, "It must have missed us by nut more lhan 10 feet. It started go- ing up, and then crashed down. The wings were going up and down just before it crashed." Rudy Vella, who lives five doors from where the plane slruck, told of hearing "some- thing like a rocket coming down Ihen an explosion" while he was still indoors. "I went outside and saw all the houses on Vella said. "My little girl was screaming because she didn't know what was going on. I ran to the corner and saw the plane on fire. The fire was tremendous. You couldn't get close." There were two men aboard Extra Tab Okayed For Education Bill the plane. The Navy identified Ihom as Lt. (j.g.) Wesley n, Ducrr, 26, an instructor from Camp Springs, Md., and Li. (j.g.) John B. Weller, 25, a stu- dent pilot from Ronvenl, N.J. They were based at Chase Field, a naval auxiliary air station at Reeville, Tex. The oilier dead were civilian? Saul Martinez, 44, and his son Eduardo, 23, newly returned from fighting in Vietnam. Bodies of the fliers were found in Ihe slreet and those of Mar- tinez and his son in their home. Police said the discovery cf a dead cat in a partly melted car, parked beside one of the houses, apparently led lo Ihe false re- port of a fiflh death. Mark Lalson, 12, dashed from his home with clothing in flames momenls after the plane struck. Hospilal attendants described his condition as grave. Mosl of the other injured suf- fered burns while fighting Ihe fire, officers said, and were dis- missed after emergency treat- ment. Israel, Syria Trade Blows for 3rd Day By THE ASSOCIATED PllliSS Israel and Syria slugged each oilier on Hie ground and in the air today for the third straight day. Tel Aviv claimed that an Israeli armored force soiled Syrian military positions on the central sector of Ihc 50-mile (ronlior. Syria claimed Dial it downed six Israeli jels in (he swirling conflict. The Israelis claimed (wo Syrian MlG21s. Tel Aviv ad- mitted Ihe loss of one jet and said Ihc pilot parachuted into Syrian tcrrilory. II marked the first time since the 19fi7 Middle East war that Israeli armor has been reported moving onto Syrian soil. The po- sitions attacked faced Rafid on the Golan Heights. A communique issued by the military command in Tel Aviv said that the Israeli force "sup- ported by artillery and aircratt attacked and seized control of enemy positions at noon loday." Israeli jels attacked Syrian army camps near Damascus (or the second day in succession, and large-scale dogfights 'raged through the Syrian skies. Then Syria announced thai Israeli tanks had crossed the cease-fire line on the Golan Heights. "Violent fighting, .along the trorillinc is still said Damascus Radio shnrlly after noon. "The enemy is throwing his armored units against our positions, and our forces are engaging thorn." A shell tore a three-fool hole in the wing of an Italian DCS jetliner as it new feet Mercury Hits Century Mark With persistence the weather finally hit 100 degrees Wed- nesday for the first time this year. The heated event look place at approximately 5 p.m., and the weatherman predicts the same for today and tomorrow. Last year, June 25, the temperature set on 101, but had been preceded by even hotter temperatures starling nn Ihe 20lh with ICH- Slighl chance for cooling Ihundershowers arc being called for by the weathernian loday and tonight. Thundersloms hit Wednesday night, in both .Sylvester, which recorded .25 inch of rain, and Wcslbrook with 1 inch. Weslbrook's correspondent said Ihc storm carried hail which damaged small crops and gardens in the area. Sylvester experienced an elec- trical storm with high winds and rain. Sweetwatcr recorded .18 last night and Snyder had a trace of rain. Market Mixed NEW YORK (AP) The slock market opened mixed to- day in moderate trading. Advances held a slim lead over declines. Changes were fractional. over Damascus, but the plane marie a safe lauding in Heirut and none of Ihe 10-1 persons aboard was hurl. The laining more than 10 tons of aviation kerosene and knocked out the two port engines. Mem- bers of Ihc crew said it WHS a "miracle" they were able lo reach Itic Lebanese capital. Egyptian President Gamal Abdel N'assor meanwhile reject- ed Ihc new U.S. plan for Middle East IKHCC, charging it ivoiilrl leave Israel in possession of Ihc Golan Heights tcrrilory which it seized from Syria in the war. Syria said 40 of its MIGs lo bailie Ihe Israeli air forco, Ihe largest number o[ inlcrccp- lois the Syrians have admitted sending up in a single engage- ment since the 1967 war. YOUNGEST COLLEGE HEAD Leon Botstein, center, named Thursday as President of New Hampshire's Franconia College, chats with Rev. Paul W. Hahmeier, Franconia College's Board Chairman, at the New York City Board of Edu- cation offices. Eofslein is currently'a'special as- sistant to the President of the-Board of Educa- tion. .Mrs. Botstein watches at left. (AP Wire- photo) No Generation Gap Appeal Court Jays For This President NEW YOP.K (AP) Last year he was a student. This year hn was a special assistant with the Hoard of Education. Next fall Leon fintslein will be- come president of Franconia College in New Hampshire at age 23. "Certainly, there will he no generation he said Thurs- day after his appointment was announced. "With only 250 stu- dents in the college I should get to know each one personally." "He'll be Ihe youngest college president in the said Ihe Rev. Paul W. Rahmoier, head of the Hoard of Trustees at the experimental college in (he White Mountains near r-'ranco- nia, N.1I. "We interviewed 16 other can- didates for Ihe job, all he added. "But we concluded (hal since Leon was best quali- fied his age was irrelevant." The outgoing president, Larry I.cmmel, is 37. He resigned in April because "I find the pres- sures of the job very difficult." Rolslein, slim and bespecta- cled, is an honors graduate of the University of Chicago and Harvard where he received a master's degree in history. He is a doctoral candidate at Har- vard. For the past year lie has served as a special assistant and double shooter for Ihe Board of Kducalion president, Joseph Monserrat, under a Sloan Foundation grant of less than In his new post he will be paid a year but he docs not expect Ihe presidency lo be a lifetime career. WEATHER U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ESSA WEATHER BUREAU (Wealhir mip, pq. 7A) ABILENE AND VICINITY (JO mlfc radius) Dear lo fwirlJy ctaydy flrd ho) Irddy, lo-i'ghl ard SalurddV wilh a chance for scattered Ihunderstawcri h Ihe pcrlhwcst Icday and lonifhl. H bolh near 100, low around 73. light and variable. High and for ?J-hours ending 9 fl.m.: 100 arxi 74. and for same period lasl year: 9i ard U. Stniel last nfchf: p.m.: junriw lorfayi a.m.; sunset lorvghl: p.m. Miss Devlin Musi Go io Prison HKLKAST, Northern Ireland (AP) The Belfast Appeal Court ruled today that Bernadetle Devlin must go to prison. A warrant for her arrest was to be issued Inter today. The court rejeclcd an application from Jliss Devlin, the youngest memher of the Krilish House of Commons, (o appeal to Ihe House of Lords against a six-month sentence given her for incitement lo riol and rioting. The House of Lords is Britain's highest court. On Monday, Northern Ireland's lord chief justice, Lord McDermott, rejected her appeal against Ihe scnlence. Her defense lawyer (hen applied for permission to take Ihe appeal to Ihe Lords in and this was turned down loday. Miss Devlin won re-election in Ihe British general election last week, and she is not expected lo lose her seat because she goes to prison. The House of Commons will have lo vole whether she remains a member, and it seemed most unlikely thai wilh Ihe threat of renewed religious warfare hanging over Northern Ireland, the legislators would inflame the Uoman Catholic minorily by ousting the young woman who has come lo be known as their Joan of Arc. By LAWRENCE KNUTSON Associated Tress Writer WASHINGTON (AP) The Senate has approved a bil- lion education money bill thai is nearly million more lhan President Nixon requested but includes the inilial funds wanted by the While House for aiding de.Tgregalins schools. The bill was passed 74 to 1 early loday, capping a long ses- sion that didn't end until after midnifihl in Ihe second half of a two-session day designed to NEWIHNWiX 7B I3A 9-MB 8B Amusements..... Bridge Classified Comics Editorials Horoscope Hospital Palienls Obituaries Sporls 10-12A To Your Good Health------5A TV Log.............. UB Women's News 2.3 B A- I3A 7 A 4B clear a work load backed up by Ihe debate over Cambodia. The final approval came after Ihe Senate passed 70 to 18 ar, amendment to provide 'mil- lion as Ihe firsl installment of the ?1.5 billion iX'ixon wants In help Soulhern school districts in Ihcir desegregation cfforls. Inclusion of the million made Ihe possibility of a Nixon vein uncertain. He rejected a similar bill earlier this year be- cause the appropriation was more than he asked, and some Republicans had warned againsl a veto Ihis lime if Ihe total went far above Nixon's re- quest. Hut because a share of ihe ov- erage is due lo Ihe million and because Nixon has ex- pressed strong desire for Ihc aid money, il is hoped he will sign Ihe measure. The House last April passed ils version of Ihe spending hill, which loraled billion. The versions now go lo confer- ence where il appears Ihe Sen- ate (olal likely will be (rimmed. Newsboys Urged to Draw on Memories By BLUE KUCKKR and BK1TY GRISSOM Q. For many years the newspaper carrier boys for The Reporter-News used llu-lr good memories In making deliveries in (heir customers. Then some nf them slarted to mark their miles with small colored spots on curbs, using different colors for different editions, lately some nf them have gotten a little, extreme wilh Ihclr spray cans, making large Xs and lines and various .shapes and designs which really seems unnecessary anil looks pretty messy. Could Ihc 11-iV prevail on Its carrier hoys (o go hack lo [he small colored spots or their good memories? A. The Hepbrter-News has tried to discourage curb marking and requested (hal if Ihis system was used that permission should first be obtained from the. residents. The carrier boys are not fl-N employes; they're independent contractors who buy the papers and then resell Ihem. We feel like traitors answering Ihis question, hill il is illegal lo discolor or deface Ihe curbs. II your curb is a real mess, prevail upon your paper boy lo remove Ihe markings. Q. Can you help me locale a meat market that offers veal for sale? So many recipes feature veal hut so far I have bffn unable to purchase It .Each hutcher I talked (o has a different definition of veal. Jusl whal is II? Also, If a recipe calls for veal cullcls, whal fill of meal. If any, can be successfully subslllulod? A. Bill Mauldin from one of the local markets doubts that veal can be bought anywhere in Texas because the feedlot operators pay more for the young calfs than Ihe butchers can. Veal would have lo sell fur a pound in Ihe markels and Hie Iiomemakcrs don't want to pay that much for il, Mauldin says. Veal is an unborn calf or one that isn't more lhan 30 lo 60 (lays old, and because of this it's very delicate in color, tender and lean. In general, most veal cuts ore very much like those of beef, cxcepl that arc considerably smaller. A good subslilule is sirloin lip, he says. Q. I would like lo know Ihc name of Ihe oldest cslalilishcd retail business In Taylor Cnunly (hat Is still In business, excluding (he Also, ulial year Ihcy started their business. A. Past experience has laiifiht us lo he very leery of saying THK oldesl, THE largest, THE only, or THE anything else. Bui we are reasonably sure lhal Ihe West Company, a hardware store in Mcrkcl, is the oldest rclail slnre slill in business in Taylor County. II was established Nov. 3, 1889, by Ihe late G.F. West whn died in 1935. Wesl had four sons who were active in Ihe business and John U'est still is, wrire laid. Q. I'd like to he on a receiving commillee for Bob Hope as 1 have several things I'd like lo talk lo him about. I'd like a personal Interview ami his autograph. I was wondering what ynn could do about Ibis? A. Since Aclion Line arranged a personal interview wilh Bob Hope for Susan J-eilner, we've been bcseiged wilh similar requests K we could arrange an interview for all of yon we'd sure do it, but only one can be planned in this case and Susan's the lucky one, since she was Ihe first lo write. Now as to hes! time for Ihis is on his arrival al Ihc airport, as he will not be giving autographs before or after Ihe show. He's scheduled to arrive about 4 p.m. Saturday. Address questions lo Action Line, Boi 30, Abilene, Texas 79644. Names will not he used hut questions must be signed and addresses given. Please Include, telephone numbers II possible, f   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication