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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: June 24, 1970 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - June 24, 1970, Abilene, Texas                                Abilene 'WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT 90TH YEAR, NO. 8 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79G04, WEDNESDAY EVENING, JUNE 24, PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS Powell Loses in N.Y. Unofficial Tally Shows Upset Associated (IP) SUNDAY -ELEGANT SETTING This horse and rider set an elegant mood at Tuesday night's Royal Lipizzan Stal- lion Show at the Taylor County Coliseum attended by nearly persons. Another performance' is set for p.m. Wednesday and officials report there are still good seats available. The show benefits the West Texas Rehabilitation Cen- ter. Ticket sales will be open until 5 p.m. at the Coliseum. The box of- fice opens at 7 p.m. for the per- 'K fbrmance. The show is reviewed by Editor Sam Pendergrast on Pg. 1-B. (Staff Photo by Billy -Adams) NEW YORK (AP) Rep. Adam Clayton Powell, for 24 years B'.trlem's flamboyant voice in Ihe House of Represent- atives, was narrowly (Mealed for rcnomination in a major up- set in Tuesday's Democralic primary. Powell, 61, losl lo slalc As- semblyman Charles Rangel, 40, in a five-man race. The final un- official tally gave Rarigel, also a Negro, votes to Powell's Rangel also has the Re- publican nomination.- I'owell was not available tor comment after it became clear lie had lost while supporters at Hangers headquarters were ju- bilant. Newsmen asked Range! if he thought Powell would ask for a recount. "I think Adam withdrew from this race a long lime he said, adding that Powell "was not serving the people and the overwhelming number wanted a change." There was a long time when that was not true. For years Powell's constituents thought he could do no wrong. As recently as two years ago he coula truthfully boast, "I could be re-elected with Mickey Mouse as my campaign manag- er." He won handily then even while he was excluded from the Jiouse for alleged misuse of funds. Powell fought (he exclusion with the Supreme Court and won. Meantime a new Congress convened and Powell was per- mitted to resume his seat, but was stripped of the seniority that had trvjrte him the chair- man of the Education and Labor Committee. His downfall begari one.Sun- day evening' in March. 1960, when in the course of a wide- Rep. Pickle Says Residents Missed in Austin AUSTIN, Tex. (AP) Rep. Jake Pickle, D-Tex., said Thurs- day night that (lie Census Bu- reau office in Austin has agreed to send forms to some ad- dresses missed in their original mailing. According lo the congressman from Austin, about Aus- tin residents were missed in the count. WEATHER U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ESSA WEATHER BUREAU nup, M. 12B) ABILENE AND VICINITY (W-mllt radiull Parity cloudy and warm today, loniohl and Thursday. High bolh days m lower LOW IMiisfcl In 70s. Windl soulf.crly 10-30 m.p.h. High and low for W hours at a.m.: 67 and Higtl and low few Fast Year: and 11. Sunsel last r.fahl: p.m.; sunrise lodav: a.m.; sunsel lofitgtit: p.m. ranging television interview, he chatted about alleged police cor- ruption in Harlem. "I can name he he did. One of them was Esther James, whom he call-xl a "bag woman for the Police slang lerai meaning a person who picks up bribes for corrupt police. The remark led lo a defama- tion suit by Mrs. James that ul- timately involved 80 judges, 10 courts, four juries and 15 law- yers. And Powell's nonappear- ance at various stages of the liligalion was a major factor leading to his exclusion from the House. In the current primary, Pow- ell as usual campaigned very litlie. He said he had won a re- cent bout with cancer and blamed Ihc illness for his recent absenteeism from Congress. He told one of his few prcpri- mary news conferences his chances of defeat were "none whalsocver." But Itangel, once a staunch Powell supporter, set the lone for the campaign: "Ho did a great job in the past but now it's lime for someone else to lake over." Former Harlem rent strike leader Jesse Gray, another can- didate, put it this way: "Adam is just tired, the community un- derstands that." CHARLES RANGEL AND ADAM CLAYTON POWELL expressions indicate who won in New York (AP WlrtplHte) New York Demos Nominate Goldberg NEW (AP) In a pri- mary full of upsets and firsts, Democrats nominated .former Supreme Court Justice Arthur J. Goldberg on Tuesday lo op- pose three-term Republican Cov. Nelson A. Rockefeller. Two veteran Democratic con- Clayton Pow- ell and Leonard were defeated. For Ihe-first time, the Demo- CMls nominated a Negro, Stale Sen. Basil Palerson of Harlem, for lieutenant governor. Her- man Radillo of tiie Bronx won a chance to become the stale's fijsl Puerto liico-born congress- man. In his first bid for elective of- fice, Goldberg, fil, defeated up- stalc millionaire Howard Sa- muels, 50. The slate's first gu- bernatorial primary in nearly fO years drew only 27 per cent of ihe Democrats despite perfect weather. The GOP had no slate- wide contests. Another millionaire, Rep. Hichard Olliiiger of suburban Wcsl Chester County, won a four-man race to oppose OOP Sen: Charles E. Goodell, ap- pointed by Rockefeller lo com- plete the term of Ihc late Robert F. Kennedy. Ollinger's massive spending for television advertis- ing was the main issue. Returns from of Ihe election districts gave Goldberg voles, Samuels In Ihe Senate race, returns from districts gave Oltin- ger Paul O'Dtvycr Court Acquits Marine DANNANG, young Marine accused of unprcmCdilatetl murder in Ihc deaths of 16 Vietnamese women and children was found innocent today after testifying he shol neither them nor enemy soldiers in Vietnam. 1 When the acquittal was announced, Pfc. Thomas n. Boyd, 13, Evaasville, Ind., jumped up, his checks stained by tears. 1 "Thank he shouted, hugged- his civilian attorney, Howard T. Trockman, and then dashed outside the tourtroom where several members of his company were awaiting the verdict. lie had been charged in the deaths of the Vietnamese Feb. 19 at Son Thang village, 27-miles soulh of here. He had faced a maximum sentence of life imprisonment. Among those waiting outside the courtroom was Boyd's'company com- mander, LI. Louis It. Amort, 23, Little Rock, Ark., and Samuel G.. Green. Hoyd, both 'laughing and crying, threw his arms around both men. 2G5.035, Theodore Sovensm and Rep. Richard Max McCarthy The Senate candidates hold similar antiwar positions. Samuels, in tears at 2 a.m., refused to concede unlil lite count was complete. A suppor- ter shouted that he should run independently in November, but Samuels said he would unile be- liind Goldberg if he is the Demo- cratic nominee. "I Ihink it's important Uiat the policies of Richard Nixon be repudiated in the State of New Samuels said. In the low-key manner that marked his whole campaign, Goldberg told a surprisingly subdued crowd at his headquar- ters: "1 still do not think it ap- propriate for me to claim victo- ry. In no way do.I criticize Mr. Samuels for not making a concession statement." Goldberg, former secretary of labor and U.N. ambassador, is the first man of national slalure Ihe Democrats have sent against Rockefeller since Rock- efeller ousted Gov. Averell Har- riman in 1958. The former union negotiator, judge and diplomat campaigned a "conciliator." He called the nomination of Paterson "more important than mine" because lie is the first black nominated for statewide office In New York. Paterson led the ticket in de- feating Jerome Ambro Jr., a while counly supervisor from Long Island vdw never made race an issue. Palerson's No- vember opponent will be Repub- lican incumbent Malcolm Wil- son Adam Walinsky, 33, former aide lo Hobcrt Kennedy, was named lo oppose Republican Alty. Gen. Louis Ihe GOP's top vote getter in past years. State Comptroller Arthur Lev- itt, only Democrat holding a statewide office, was unopposed for renomination. Powell, 61, unbeatable in Har- lem for 25'years, was defeated narrowly by stale Assemblyman Charles Rangel, 40, a Negro who also has Republican back- ing. Powell had a recent bout with cancer but said his doctors had given him a clean bill of health. V Farbstein, 67, a seven-term veteran from downtown Man- hattan who has survived a ser- ies of "reform" challenges, was bealen by a woman lawyer, Bel- la Abzug, who was slrong.fur peace and women's liberation. Rep. John Rooney, also 67, 14-lerm veteran -and one of the powers on trie House Appropria- tions Committee, turned back Peter G. Eikenberry, 36. Market Lower NEW YORK (AP) The stock market opened lower today in moderate trading. Declines led advances by about 3 to I. Rose Construction Gets Courthouse Job STORM DOOR A demonstrator kicks out glass panel in door of the District of Colum- bia welfare office Tuesday during protest by more than 500 welfare mothers demand- ing money lo buy furniture. Police arrested 44 during the demonstration sponsored by the local welfare righls organization. (AP Wirepholo) Con You Keep Chickens Here? By ELL1E THICKER and BETTY GRISSOM Q. Is (here an ordinance against keeping chickens, roosters or lowl of any kind within Ihe City limits? A. You may keep any of Ihose in the city under certain circumstances. They must not create a sanitation problem; they must be penned tip, not running loose, and Ihey must be kept reasonably (inlet. (Good luck keeping your rooslcr If your fowls don't meel those requirements, someone will probably report (hem by calling Ihc cily attorney's office at 673-37S1. Q Will (hose of its who are on cable TV receive Ihe local wcalhci bullcllns If we are watching the Dallas-Ft. Worth stations at the lime the bulletin is given? A. No. Cable programs will not be interrupted to give local weather bullclins. The Cable TV manager said they may be able lo Inject bulletins into their regular programs in the future, but they don't have the facilities (o do so now. Q. I've suffered In silence for awhile; now I'm starting my own protest movement.-. .AGAINST DAYLIGHT SAVINGS TIME. My children can't sleep when put to bed In broad daylight with lawn mowers rearing until nearly II p.m. I dread this battle every year, the older kids wail to slay out and play- poor mama gives In and next miirnlng when bahy (who Is net Daylight Savings) wakes al t a.m., mama starts her day with Urge bags under her eyes. Help! Help! How do we get back on Standard A. Every slate is automatically on daylight savings time unless its legislature votes to exempt it. So this fall, vote for Ihe stale senator and representative who, like you, is against it. Then after elections make it a point lo write all your area representa- tives and express your scnlimenls. In niost cases, your legislators want lo keep (he voters happy. Sentiment seems to be widely divided in Texas, however. Q. Since Ihe Invasion of Cambodia, we hear so much about Indochina. Just what countries constitute Indochina? A. French Indochina Includes Laos, Cambodia, North Vietnam and Soulh Vietnam. But also in Indochina ihe southeast pennisula of Asia south if China and north of Indonesia arc the Union ol Burma, the Federation of Malaya anil Thailand. Q. I have an old vlelln which has been In Ihc family (or over 1H years. It bears Ihe Inscription: Anfonlns Slradlvarlits, Crcnionrnsls Faclcbal, Atlno 1733, Marie in Germany. I may have a valuable instrument; could yon loll me where I can have It appraised? A. Yes, it will cost you about to have it appraised by William Lewis, 30 E. Adams, Chicago, Illinois. But we can save you some time, trouble and money if you promise not lo be indignant when we say your violin is almost cerlain lo be a copy of a Stradivarius since it was made in Germany. Stradivarius lived.and died in llaly. lie died in 1737 and made only Iwo violins in his last few years, but thousands of copies of his violins were made in Germany. Artdrees questions (o Action Line, Rox Texas 79WJ. Names will not he used but questions must be signed and addresses -given. Please Include telephone If possible. Taylor County Commissioners Court awarded the contract Wednesday morning for construction of the new Taylor County Courthouse lo Hose and McMillan Winner In S. Carolina COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) Rep. John L. McMillan, 72- year-old chairman of Ihe House District of Columbia Commit- tee, has won Dcmocralic renom- ination lo a 17th consecutive term in a runoff primary elec- tion wilh racial ovcrloncs and charges of voting irregularities. McMillan piled up voles Tuesday to for a Negro physician, Dr. Claud Stephens, 38. The turnout was about more than in the first Demo- cratic primary June 9, when McMillan failed by 543 voles lo gain' Ihe necessary majority over Stephens and Iwo olher op- ponents, both white. Members of Ihe Southern Christian Leadership Confer- ence (SCI.C) and workers from the United Citizens party, an all-black political unit, moved into Ihe 6th District lo campaign for Stephens. Hosea Williams, an SCLC vice president from Atlanta, Ga., as- serted lhat ballots marked for McMillan were found on Ihe eve of the election at the home of a Negro at Atlantic Beach in Hor- ry County. Sons Construction Co. of Abilene. Rose Co. had the low bid Jim Rose of Rose Construction eslimaled that it would lake two years (o complete (he court- Irouse. The court plans a ground- breaking ceremony in the near future. Architect Jim Tilde said, "It really is an oulslanding build- ing." Others who submitted bids Tuesday afternoon were Construction Co. of Abilene, Cooper Construction Co. of Odessa and Area Builders of Odessa. Members of the court were well pleased with the bids and said, "The way it looks, we're wilhin the county money." County Judge Hoy Skaggs told those gathered for the event that "this is a momentous occasion. It's been more.than 50 years since we have had a big opening for a new courthouse." The commissioners had car- marked million for the con- struction of the new courthouse, acquiring of Uie land and expansion and renovation of Ihe jail. It was noted that the land for Ihe courthouse site cost and the jail project would run approximately NEWS INDEX Amusements'.......; I 1A Bridge IIA Classified 8-12B Comics 78 Ediloriols AB Horoscope 5B Hospital Polionts....... 12B Obituaries 2A Sports..............8-10A To Your Good Health____1 IA TV Log ...............4B .Women's'Nlews' -3B   

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