Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: June 23, 1970 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - June 23, 1970, Abilene, Texas                                Abilene "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT Byron 90th YEAR, NO. 7 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, TUESDAY EVENING, JUNE 23, 1970 -TWENTY PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS Associated Prfis (if) SUNDAY Towns Deluge Census People BI PRODUCTION UNDERWAY Aileen Co. personnel are now completely in their new building at 1000 111 20, ac- cording to general manager Robert Movers, lie said every- thing had been moved in there and in operation since June 15. Architect James Wheeler said work is completed on the main building, that some work is still underway on a separate mechanical equipment building which is due to be completed this week. Moyers and Wheeler .said it's hoped that the firm will have 100 per cent occupancy of the complex next week. (Staff Photo by Don Blakley) They Say Count Is Cheating Them Ily JOHN M. PEARCE Assni'iHlCfl Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP) Tile Census Bureau has been hit will) an unprecedented volume of complaints for disappointed towns who lliink Ihc offical gov- ernment rose tount cheated them. liul (lie bureau maintains its results are accurate. Shilling population and unnoticed eco- nomic changes are the reasons WORK PROGRESSING Construction on the Valley Faucet Co. building at 2121 IH 20 is 50 to 60 per cent complete, according to architect James Wheeler. He says (here is quite a bit ot partition work to be done inside. Division Manager Frank Pieczynski says the target date for moving in is early September. In the left foreground is the U.S. Brass plant. (Stall Photo by Don Blakley) Cambodians Driven From 2 Villages Dy RICHARD PYLK Associated Press Writer SAIGON (AP) _ North Viet- namese troops drove Ji Cambo- dian batlalion from Iwo villages on the Mekong River about 11 miles northeast of I'lraom Penh, and the retreating batlalion commander said his men had discovered a Soviet rocket that conlrt hit the capital. As the battalion commander, Maj. lios Prcung, stood on Ihe river bank al Mouk Khampoul, four Cambodian T28 planes at- tacked the occupied villages with napalm, selling most of Ihe thalch and wood buildings afire. Cambodian troops said the vil- lagers had fled lo the sonlh when -an estimated North Vietnamese attacked early to- day. Pieung said his battalion of 400 men was hit from three sides and forced inlo the river. They retreated by fishing boats lo Ihe west bank. He said four of his men were killed and abnut 20 wounded, but he claimed they killed at least 30 Viet Cong and North Vietnamese. The Viet Cong and North Viet- namese now have the upper hand along much of the Mekong where il courses down through EXPERIMENT WITH RECRUITS Rewards Better Than Drill Sergeant, 2 Officers Claim CHICAGO (AP) Two Army officers say an cxperimcnlal re- cruit training system which em- phasizes rewards is producing belter results than the tradition- al drill sergeant approach with the accent on punishment. Lt. Col. William E. Dalcl, a psychologist, and Lt. Col. Llew- ellyn J. Idlers, a physician, re- ported Monday on results of the experiment al Ft. Ord, Calif. In a paper presented to the annual convention of the Ameri- can Medical Association, they said the idea was meeting resis- tance from the old-type drill sergeant, who "seems lo oper- ate from the conviction lhal present suffering is insurance against future suffering." Market Mixed NEW YORK (AP) The slock market opened mixed loday in moderate trading. Advances and declines were running neck lo neck. NEED CASH? Look around Ihe house and garage for ihose items thai you no longer use. Sell them in Family Week-Ender FRI.-SAT.-SUN. 3 Lines 3 Days No Erimhn or Refund il Thli gtli Approximalely 15 Average Woroi No Phone Orders Plcoie Only CASH IN ADVANCE YOU SAVE S1.95 ABILENE REPORTER-NEWS DEADLINE THURS. 3 P.M. The Iwo officers said this view leads to "harassment and ver- bal abuse" of trainees and "de- privation of stalus, of individual autonomy and of recognition." They said three companies of recruits al Ft. Ord thrived on Ihc merit system, with fewer basic training injuries and AWOI.S than other companies. The system is being tested on a further 10 groups. Trainees are given merit cards and Dieir training officers award them points on such things as inspections and scores on written and performance tests. A trainee can earn a maxi- mum of 50 points a week. These can be "cashed in" on such privileges as going to the mov- ies or a pass. In Ihe first Iwo companies so trained, Dale] said, Ihere were no absences withoul leave. There were five in the third, which he attributed lo problems in testing. The rccruils "heartily endorse Die he said. Noting thai the typical recruit is around 20 years old, Datel and Lcgters said: "II is wasteful lo discard Ihe resulls of 20 years of socializa- tion, wrought by Ihe family, Ihe school, the church, and our "WEATHER U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ESI A WEATHER BUREAU (Wealher map, P9. 7A) ABILENE AND VICINITY (W-mHa ntdiui) Parity cloudy and warm loday, fon'ioM 3nd Wednesday wilh only a n ptr cenl chance oJ Ihundeitnowen loday arid loiiioril. High loday and In low Low today In 755. Wlrvfi llghl and fculherly. lltgh and low for 24-houra ending At 9 a.m.: El and si, High and low lor same, period Iftsl year: 9fl and 70. Sunsel tail nlgnl: p m.; luririM Icday: a.mj sumel p.m. democratic inslilutions. "It is these Institutions, alter all, with their symbolic and con- crete meanings, lo which the American soldier is ultimately committed and for which ho fighls and dies. "The mililary subculture is only the vehicle (or defense. 11 is not what is defended. To re- quire ultimate devotion lo Ihe authoritarian values of the mili- lary subculture, and simulta- neously lo atlcmpt to obliterate Iwo decades of psychological preparation, is unnecessary, in- congruous, wasteful and perni- cious." eastern Cambodia. The only government slrongpoint left be- Iwcen Mouk Khampoul and Ihe Laotian border is al Tnnle Del and Kompong Cham, 50 milos northeast of Phnom Penh. This new pressure on Phnom Penh from Hie norlheasl was coupled wilh reports that two North Vietnamese regiments were eslablishing positions around Prey Vcng, a provincial capital 31 miles east of the na- tional capilal, lor what may be a major attack. An -attack on Prey Vcng could be Ihe prelude lo (he drive on Phnom Penh which military sources in the Cambodian capilal expect. South Vietnamese forces in Cambodia reported three clash- near Ihe border south- east of Kompong Cham and one near which a tolal of 37 Viet Cong and North Viet- namese and four Soulh Viet- namese were killed. Tlie U.S. Command reported three Amer- icans killed and 15 wounded in skirmishing near I ho border, with a lolal of 10 enemy soldiers killed. The U.S. Command's figures for lolal American casualties in Cambodia since April 29 jumped from 312 to 323 killed and from to wounded. But offi- cials attributed the sharp in- creases to "adjustments" re- snlling Irom delays in field re- ports and other factors. No Penally Expected In Apollo Failure WASHINGTON (AP) _ The space agency probably won't penalize Ihe Iwo aerospace firms that allowed inadequate switches to be placed on Ihc Apollo 13 oxygen lank which ex- ploded en route lo the moon. The conlracl with Noi'lji American Rockwell, Ihe linn thai received more than Si bil- lion for all (he Apollo command and service modules, doesn't contain a penalty clause, II is a cost-plus fixed fee contract and mosl of il has been paid. Apollo 13 was nearing Hie moon April 13 when one of iLs Iwo oxygen tanks blew up, knocking oul all spacecraft pow- er. Astronauts James A. Lovell Jr., Fred W. Haise Jr., anil John L. Swigert .lr., limped home using propulsion and lifc- supporl systems of Ihnir lunar lander. But (he million mission to land on Ihc highlands ol the moon was a failure. Ttic Apollo 13 review hoard blamed North American Rock- well, the Beech Aircraft Corp., and the space agency itself for "an unusual combination of mislakes coupled with a some- what deficient and unforgiving design." It said the under subcontract by in- adequate proleclive switches, a loose fill lute and was inadequ- ately tested. "II was a serious oversight in which all parties Ihe report said. NEWS INDEX Amuscmenls...........6A Business News........ 12 A Bridge................9A Classified............5-73 Comics Edilorials..............8A Horoscope.............5A Hospital Patients........7A Obiluaries.............2A Sports 1A This Man's Arl.........oA To Your Good Health 5A TV Log...............9A Women's News..........3B the local estimates are olf, il says. In some cases (he Census fig- ures, which arc preliminary and comptcle only in some areas, are embarrassing becsuse (he city fathers or booster groups have used higher ones in promo- lion. In others, however, population determines how much money Ihc city receives from stale or federal governments and lower than-expectcd figures can mean real financial readjustment. "We have [oinv.1 ro case where the figures were even in- significantly Census offi- cial Paul A. Squires said, al- though he conceded rechecks "luin up a few missed house- holds." liul he said complaints are higher than in 19GO because the bureau admitted it missed 5 million people that year, thus encouraging local officials lo question figures this time. Squires said most of (he com- plaints come from areas Ihe forms wont oul by mail but were lo be held for an enumera- tor lo pick up. "At least hundreds of these, and perhaps thousands, are still out ihere" because people were not al home and Ihc nu- merators got (he basic popula- tion information from their neighbors. Squires said. liivcsligations have shown this lo be the case in 97 or 98 por cenl of the cases, he said, although Ihe forms lying uncol- lectcd in homes ilo "slimulale lliis feeling of undercoiml." But despite the complaints, ranging from mild o.ucslioning lo a warning thai "they're going lo be sorry llicy released those Squires maintained the bureau is "not li< the least bit disturbed." If he is nol, dozens of local of- ficials canvassed in a national Associated Press survey' are. The returns are nol in yd from Ihe major areas or from Californian Ihe most populous slale by recent estimates. Bnl overall, Ihe bu- reau expects lo find the nalinn has something over 204 million people, ahoul 25 million more than Ihe 1960 fiend count showed. The Conslilulion requires a census every 10 years, and one of its major uses is deciding how many members each slale can send lo the House of Rcprc- schlatives. On the local level, however, the concern is over such Ihinqs as Ihe dislribution of slale school money or the classifica- tion of towns. Diilnlh, Minn., for example, scoured the TOslers of Great Lakes seamen for Duluth resi- donls lo bring ils population (o Ihe minimum needed for Ijsling as a first-class city. Its preliminary figure was (AP Wirenhak) REVENGE plowed up road I rate Grader Operator Tears Up Road, Flees POINT ROBERTS, Wash. irale grader operator from Burnaliy, H. C., plowed up a road Monday, bashed in the side of.ii police car, Ihen barged across Ihe U.S.- Canadian border in a fusillade of police bullets, aulhorilies renorlcd. Police on bolh sides of the border later pieced logelher the details of the incident and gave Ihis account: The grader operator, Ernest R. Astells, 40, crossed Ihe Ixirdor into Poinl Hoberls to collect SfiSO from contractor Philip Sopow for work done on feet of blacktop road. "I lold him his work had been unsatis- factory and I had to bring in anolher- conlnictor from Vancouver lo do the work over again." said Sopow. The grader operator lold Sopow he had a grader parked onlsitle and would tear up the road if he wasn't paid. Sopnw lalor told authorities he thought it was a bluff, but telephoned Deputy Sheriff Chad Caswell, who arrived just as the grader slarted gouging holes in the road. Caswell parked his car in front of the grader which plowed ahead, taking a chunk ou! of the car. More police arrived. The grader then headed for Canada, pursued by police firing shots at the machine's big tires in a futile effort to halt il. The grader lumbered past Canadian cMistoms officers and into Tsawassen, B. C Conlacled by a newsman, Astells verified the accounl given by authorities but declined lo discuss the incidenl. iN'o charges were filed, since (lie offense is nonoxtradictable, aulhorilies said. They estimated, damage lo the police cruiser at Point Roberts is U.S. territory on a small peninsula which can be reached by land only through Canada. City Pays Jurors Only for Service By ELL1E RUCKER and BETTY GRISSOM Q. When did the Cily of Abilene change Its policy In compensating personnel summoned for ]nry duly? One day lasl week I received a card summoning me for jury duty. I was nol selected, nul was (old to report back at fi.ni. No courl was held (hat afternoon so we were released about p.m. I missed a day's salary because of (he call lo jury duty, ye( I was not paid by Ihe City. My wife was railed once and never served, but was still paid because she reported for the whole week. A. It sounds as if Iwo different courts were involved. City Court, where you were asked to serve, pays a day only if you actually serve on a jury. Since 'the City summons jurors for one day al a time, your wife was apparently summoned lo County or District Court if she was to report for a whole week. County and Dislricl Courts and if a juror reports lo Ihe courtroom he is paid per day whelher or not he actually serves on a jury. Q. Is the Royal Uplzzan Stallion Show at Taylor County Collscnm the same I.lpl77an horse show lhal Mas In Foil Worth lasl month? A. No, Ihe show that appeared in Fort Worlh was Olto Hermann's Lipizzan Eques- trian Show. The Austrian Embassy in Wash- ington says Ihere is no connection between Hermann's Show and the Spanish Riding School in Vienna and that Mr. Hermann is not from Austria. The horses performing in Abilene are, Ihe 16 Austrian Lipizzans from the Walt Disney movie, "Miracle of the While Stallions." Q. The outdoor scenery In (he movies "True Crll" and "Paint Your Wagon" and Ihe TV scries "The Virginian" Is very hcantlltil. Is (here any way (o find out where (hey were photographed? A. "Paint Your Wagon" was filmed in Ihe Wallowa National Forest, 47 mountain miles summon ihcir jurors for a week at a lime, northeast of Baker, Ore "True Grit" was filmed in Monlrose, Colo. "The Virginian" is shot al various places, but it's usually filmed in California, often at Bear Lake near Los Angeles, and sometimes al Lake Tahoe near fteno, Nev. Q. T have an unusual question lo ask you. What is a person supposed lo do when he knows he needs a psychiatrist and cannot begin lo afford (o go to one? Is he supposed lo. just lose his mind or what? Is (here any hope for him? Thank you for finding out, this Is Important lo me. A. Contact your family doclor or your minister and discuss your problem wilh them; Ihey've. served as able substitutes lor psychialrisls in some cases. If you hcsilale at lhal suggestion, (hen call the Mental llcallh Assn. al 677-G251. They can rlirecl you lo ministers who have special training in counseling and may be able lo help. Q. My children are very tonri of the chocolalc cookies served In Ihe cafelorium al Jackson Klcmendiry vSchnoI. They're about 3 Incffcj In diameter. Could you gel Ihe recipe? A. Mrs. Flora King, lunch room manager, says to cream together 2 cups plus 1 tablespoon sugar, and oz. shortening. Then add two eggs. Silt together 3 cups flour, leaspoon baking powder, V2 teaspoon soda, leaspoon salt and (bis. cocoa. Add 1 Icasp. vanilla and a little red food coloring. Cook until set. This will yield aboul 2 dozen cookics. Q. Can I melt glass bottles for re- shaping Inlo art objects In my regular slove oven? A. No, a regular kitchen-type oven reach- es a maximum tempcralurc. ol 500 degrees (slightly more il it's Ihe self-cleaning type) and for botlle melting you need a kiln which will reach 1800 degrees Fahrenheit. Kach boltle has a different softening or melting point, incidentally. Address questions (o Action Line, Box 30, Abilene Texas Names will not be used bul questions must be signed and nililresscs given. Please Include telephone numbers if possible,   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication