Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: June 9, 1970 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - June 9, 1970, Abilene, Texas                                "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT 89TH YEAR, NO. 356 PHONE 673-4271 PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, TUESDAY EVENING, JUNE 9, 1970 Aanciiited lUc SUNDAY Hussein Misses Death Would-Be Assassins Fire on King's Motorcade in Jordan AMMAN, Jordan (AP) King Hussein escaped an assas- sination attempt today in the midst of fighting between (lie Jordanian army and Palestinian guerrillas, the Amman radio re- ported. The anny troops were trying lo curtail guerrilla incursions into Israel. The broadcast said Hussein's motorcade was fired upon this morning as heavy fighting raged in the streets of Hie capi- tal. Leaders of both sides worked out a cease-fire arrangement laic in the morning but this was ignored and the bitter fighting raged into the afternoon. The combatants battled with rockets, bazookas, machine guns and automatic weapons, filling tlie city with the crash ol explosions and the bark of gun- fire. Hussein's molorcade was driving through the crossroads town of Swcilch 12 miles north- cast of the capital, the radio said. H broadcast a message from Prime Minister Bahjat Talhouni congratulating the king [or hav- ing escaped unharmed "from Ihe treacherous attack on the royal motorcade." Official Says Sniper Evidence Insufficient OFF TO NEW HOME This fawn's mother was killed by a car near Grcsham, Ore., and the baby deer was found wandering on the highway. Don Wright, Multnoman County sheriff's deputy, took the foundling to the Portland Zoo after feeding it with a baby bottle. (AP Wirepholo) Argentine Life Goes On As Junta Takes Charge BUENOS AIRES (AP) Argentina gol a new military govern- ment early today after the armed forces ousted President Juan Carlos Ongania, the general they inslalled in a coup four years ago. Not a shot was fired, and life went on mostly as usual for the 8 mil- lion residents of Buenos Aires. The three military Sweeiwaler Soldier Killed in Cambodia SWEETWATER (HNS) Wil- liam A. (Billy) Morion, 23, son of Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Morton of Sweelwalcr, has been reported killed in action Friday in Cambodia. Morton was wounded in Viet- nam in March of 1969 last year and after recuperating from his vound reenlisled in the Army and returned to Vietnam lor combat duty in October. His parents received word of his death Monday. lie was born in Sweclwnler July 1, 1946 and graduated from Sweetwater High School in 1964. He entered Ihe service June 4, W58. Survivors include his parents; a brother, Seaman: Devauglm stationed in Orlando, Fla.; his grandmother, Mrs. George Morton of Snyder; grand- parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jake Glasgow of Mansfield, Ark. Market Mixed NEW YORK (AP) The s'.nck market opened mixed in moder- ate trading. Advances held a narrow lead over declines. Lt. Gen. Alejandro Lanusse of the army, Adm. Pedro Gnavi of the navy and Brig. Juan Carlos Hey of the air sworn in as pro- visional leaders of the nation of 23 million people. The junta said it would name a president within 10 days. Among Iliosc being mentioned for the presidency are Eduardo Ortiz Basualdo, the conservative president of the Supreme Court who is reported lo have powerful navy backing; Justice Minister C o n r a d o Etchebarnc, who has wide dupport in the army, and two relired army generals, Jean Enrique Giiglielmelli and Osiris Villegas, both of whom are supported by factions thai believe in rapid development of heavy industry. The junta said their basis disagreement with Ongania was "the lack of a political solution for the Ihe term used for the 1066 coup. Speeches in the last year by Lanusse indicate that he may seek a return to some democratic procedures before very long. Growing dissatisfaction with Ongania came lo a head Monday morning when Lanusse announced that the president had refused to accept a "political plan" from the armed forces calling on him to snare power wilh Ihe military and consult with civilian leaders. It appeared to suggest that a dale be fixed for presidential elections. Ongania then fired I-anusse, said he would take personal command of the army and barricaded himself in Government House behind the loyal, heavily armed man presidential guard. By MARK BROWN Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP) The man heading Hie government's probe of student deaths on the Kent State and Jackson State campuses says there is "insuffi- cient evidence" to support offi- cials' claims of sniper fire. "We have at this time insuffi- cient evidence lo cslablish Ihe presence of a Assl. Ally. Gen. Jcrris Leonard said of the May ]5 deaths of two black youths in a [usillade of po- lice bullels at Jackson State Col- lege in Mississippi. His statement directly contra- dicts the report released last Thursday by Mississippi Gov. John Bell Williams that said an investigation showed stale troopers were shol at by a snip- er before opening fire on a group of students outside a women's dormitory on tlie pre- dominently black campus. Leonard is head of the Juslice Department's civil rights divi- sion and leader of a federal investigation into the fatal shootings by law enforcement authorities of the two youllis at Jackson Stale, four students at Kent State University in Ohio and six men in Augusta, Ga. In an interview, Leonard was asked whether his statement could also be applied to tire deaths at Kent Stale, where Ohio Nalional Guardsmen said they had been fired upon by a sniper before shooting into a crowd of students demonstrat- ing against U.S. military in- volvement in Cambodia. "Yes, there is insufficient evi- dence at Leonard re- plied. The civil rights chief refused to comment on whether the probes, in the case of Kent Slate more than a month along, had (AP Winphslo) JKUlllS LEONARD assistant ally, general identified Ihe ofr.ccrs or guards- men who fired the fatal shots. But he acknowledged, in the case of Jackson Stale, that "procedural problems" had hindered the. investigation by FBI agents and Juslice Depart- ment lawyers. "The slate patrol has not pro- vided us wilh Ihe weapons, nor have members of the slate pa- trol been offered for interroga- lie said. sources in Lebanon, said Ihe king's driver was wounded in the incident but gave no other dlails. Jordanian authorities and the guerrilla ronlral Ihe supreme Palestinian had niol in Amman and agreed lo an immediate cease-fire, the radio s-iid in an earlier report. They also agreed lo set up a joint op. orations room lo "supervise and control the situation." Joint army-guerrilla palrols wnre sent to the streets to "si- lence all and any sources of fire anrl lo crush any provocative measures which could worsen the the radio said. Anpcals for culm also came from Ihe Iraqi commander of the Arab eastern front, the Iraqi revolutionary Command Coun- cil and the Syrian stale radio. President Charles Hclou if Le- banon contacted Hussein and was told efforts were under way lo restore order, according lo Arab radio reports. Open warfare broke mil be- tween King Hussein's troops TEATHER U S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ESS.Y WEATHER BUREAU (Weather map, P9. 7A> ABILENE AND VICINITY Wmite radiui) Cloudy lo parlfy clot-ir wilh a slinhl chance for widely icajlcrcd showers and Ihur.dersterms. TwEnly conl cbarce lodsy Ihraugn Wed- nesday. High loday and Wednesday In upper E0l- L cw Icrtay around 68. Winds loullwrlv 1C 50 m.p-h. Hfgh and Cow for 2J-r.ouri ertfmg al 7 a.m.: 8] and and !ov; for same period last venr: ED and 65. Swivel lasl p m.: sunr.se fDdav: a.m.; junsel lonifihU p.m. and militant Palestinians aflcr two dnys of tension and the ov- ernight kidnaping by the guer- rillas of Morris Draper, the U.S. Embassy's political officer. The guerrillas and Jordanian government forces clashed rc- pealedly Sunday night, about 50 people reporled killed or wounded and about 40 guer- rillas arrested. Officials snid Draper, 42, a native of Califor- nia, released unharmed aft- er the 40 guerrillas were freed. The fighting today began just Mace-Swinging Professor Clouts Campus Dissident NEED CASH? Look around the house and garage for those items thai you no longer use. Sell them in 'he Family Week-Ender FRI.-SAT.-SUN. 3 Lines 3 Days No Extension Reftnd if Thli Approximately 15 Averagi Ho Phone Orderi Only '00 CASH IN ADVANCE YOU SAVE ABILENE REPORTER-NEWS DEADLINE THURS. 3 P.M. ITHACA, NY. (AP) A 77- year-old professor of Romance languages has asscrled tlie au- thority of Cornell University by swinging its a young demonstrator. Morris Bishop, Alpha Kappa professor emeritus, cairicd tlie university mace in Monday's commencement exercises here and used it lo beat back a youth trying to wrest the microphones from university officials. "The Bishop related, "was originally a weapon of of- fense in the Middle Ages. Rich- ard the Lionhearled used to car- ry one at his side all the time. I saw no reason why 1 shouldn't use il for Ihe same purpose. I poked him and pushed him back." Witnesses said Bishop, a slncky man, look the 14-pound silver and gold instrument from his right shoulder and delivered a blow at tlie young man's side. "He stumbled back a few Bishop said, "then a cou- ple of the strong-arm boy.i (campus police) look him away." Police arrested three of Ihe demonstrators. Two, a student and a former student identified by university officials as an ac- livisl leader during his days on campus, were charged wilh dis- orderly conduct and resisting arrest. The third man, who police said was not associated with Ihe university, was charged with third degree assault. Tlie 4-foot mace is a tapered silver shad with a gold terres- trial globe at Ihe lop. The globe is surrounded by silver ribs and a life-inch image of a bear hold- ing an oar sits on top. It was designed by Sir Eric Clements of the Goldsmith's Guild of Bishop is no stranger lo cam- pus disorders, though his re- search in the subjecl has cen- tered mainly on tlie I9lh century variety. In a rei'cnl lalk before the Board of Trustees of the Cornell University Council, Bishop termed cui-rent campus demon- strations tame compared to those of Ihe early 1800s. Speaking en Hie "loiver deplhs of higher he de- tailed pilchcd haltlcs with facul- ty members, horsewhipping and cannon bombardments. On oc- casion, ho said, Ihe faculty fought back. HE Moth Balls Will Rid Yards of Armadillos By ELLIE RUCKER and BETTY CRISSOM Q. A number of years ago my neighbor and I were plagued by arma- dillos, not only digging up our yards bul they tunneled (heir way under our houses and hanged (heir backs against (he. floors all night. We even hired a trapped to try to calch these crcaluics to no avail. After ahouf four years of Ihosc pests an old farmer told me to put moth balls or crystals, which are better) all around the yard and under (he htdsc. We dkl and the armadillos left and illdn't come back during Ihe next 10 years lhat I lived here In I fcojre (his will work for (nose people In Abilene. By tlie way, molh crystals will also run off skunks. A- Thank you for your letter; your suggestion sounds like a grand idea. One reader down Buffalo Gap way says he has a trap thai will catch armadillos. He caughl 10 last year and five in the last two weeks. We sent Coimly Trapper Eldon Martin and Ihe lady that wrolc Ihe original question his ad- dress, so they could drop by to take a look at it- One lady reader says, "To calch an arma- dillo you have lo chase them down and catch them by Hie tail. If Ihcy happen to gel in a hole they can hang on wilh their feet, so, to make them turn loose you have lo hold the (ail in one hand and lickle their stomach wilh the other hand. This really she says, "because we have used this method many limes.'1 This tickled Action lines Gig- gle box and we'd love to see Ihis lady in ac- tion. 0. Is (here any law against catching ami keeping horned loads because they are becoming oxtlncl? A. Yes, In 1907 Ihe legislature passed a law lo prohibit killing, capturing; selling, or transporting horned loads in Ihe stale of Texas. The penalty or fine is from ?1 to ?2. The purpose of Ihe law was lo prevent the curio dealers capluring large numbers of horned loads lo sell in part of the counlry where [hey are non-exislcnl, says Robert Wood, Game Game Manager Officer, as he is now called. Q. What arc the statues or figures located on the South First entrance of Ihe Lincoln Junior High, on lop of the bulWing? They look like cats or sonic such. What do they represent? Have they been (here since the school was built? How old is (he school? A. The gargoyle type figures on top of the building have no significance, but are just part of Ihe architectural design. They have been there since the school was buill in 1324. We were certain it musl he eagles, since the building housed Hie Abilene High School Eagles (or so many years, bul after going f by to take a look, we found out differently. II aroused the curiosity of several others and Ihcy are also going by lo take a look. Q. When a number ot hostesses go in together lo have a big party Is it proper (o Invite only (he hostess who called you, or all the hostesses, whether you know Ihcm or not, in reluming the courtesy? I argue all the hostesses should be renumbered bu( friends say only the person calling you is entitled to an Invilaffnn. I can'l find It In any of my cllqucltc books. A. II isn't in our etiquette book, either. Fortunately, Abilene has a grand lady who, for 21 years professionally answered house- wives questions on cooking, hints for the house wife, and eliruieltc. Anne Smart says she would feel obligated lo all the hostesses, since they shared equally in the respon- sibility and expense of c.Ucrlaining. Anne Smart's motto Is "Do Ihe kindest thing" when in doubl about a social courtesy. after dawn and soon spread lo all parts of the city. Four hours later the fighting intensified. Gunfire echoed froni all over the cily, punctuated by the loud- er sounds of rockets and shells. Guests at the American- owned Intercontinental Hotel threw themselves lo Ihe floor as builels whipped through the lob- by, breaking windows and light fixture. No casualties were re- ported in the hotel, bul many bodies were reporled lying in a road near Ihe holel, said to be civilians caught in Ihe crossfire. Pepsi Fizzles Out, Victim of the War Ily HIKllI A. i AI' Special P1INOM 1'ENMI, Camgodia (AP) Pepsi-Cola's bubbling business has fizzled in Canibu- dia. The army grabbed the sinla trucks lor supply wagons, and the boys down -at the holding plant have gone off to war. Teen-agers and old women sling the soft drink cases in the modernistic blue and while plant on the banks of tlie Me- kong, but deliveries are off (it) per cent. Many roads leading to provincial towns are in enemy hands, the bridges blown, anil tlie company has only a handful of Inicks left lo supply local dealers. Since It arrived in Cambodia in 1963, two years ahead of rival Coca-Cola, Pepsi has had fan- lnslic success, moving rapidly ahojd of orange drink and beer as (Jic Jialion's No. i (hirst quencher. Last year Cambo- dians knocked back 26 million bottles of Pepsi. The belelmil- chewing older set in particular seems lo like its cffervesconecc, but it also is popular, between pipes, with the turned-oil young- er generation in the opium par- lors, legal in Cambodia. At the wilset of the war Iwo months ago, pkml manager Chung Kimhor had a fleet of 11 red, white and blue heavy-duty Dodge anil Fargo trucks. Tli army commandeered 40 to haul Iniops and ammunition to the front. Then 40 more fell hors tie combat lo Viet Cong rockcls and hard-looling Cambodian army drivers. Along all major roads at the oulskirls of Phnom Penh lines of empty soft drink trucks stand ready as an evacuation convoy in case the capital is overrun. The burst-out bulks of five more si( in a starker line on a lonely bond of the main highway cast from Kompong Cham. Viet Cong rocketeers have come lo associate .the word Pepsi with secondary explosion, from the pyrotechnics thai result when a Bill rocket lu'ls the spot in a trnckload of hand grenades. Plant manager Kimhor con- cedes that the tactical situation lias his drivers a bit uptight about making the run into the piovirices even it the roads wer- en't cut or the bridges blown. Besides, lie lias no desire lo risk the rest of his fleet, down (o 23 trucks with the army knocking at the gales for more. In mldllion tlie army has just tripled its order for Pepsi-Cola. After a hot day of ball ling I lie Cong, Ihe boys like a frosty liol- lle with their steaming rice pots. NEWS INDEX Amusomcnls 6A Business News......... MA Business Outlook........28 Bridge............... 8B Glorified............ 5-8B Comics................4B Editorials 10A Horoscope 8B Hosnilal Palicnls........7 A Obituaries............. 4A Snorts This Man's Art 6A To Your Good Health 8B TV Loq.............. I2A Women's News 3B KAYAK COMMUTER Ann Bigtord, a junior at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, commutes to class at least twice a week by kayak. She carries the 50-pound boat on her head to the river, then paddles a half-hour to reach the university. About the only thing that bothers her is the wake loft by the big Missis- sippi lUvev barges. (AP Wirepholo) A   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication