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Abilene Reporter News: Friday, June 5, 1970 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - June 5, 1970, Abilene, Texas                                Abilene "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT 89TH YEAR, NO. 352 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79G04, FRIDAY EVENING, JUNE 5, PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS Associated Prca SUNDAY Stuffed Bags Hijacker More Demanded After Payoff HIJACKER ABOARD hijacker of a TWA jet stands holding his pistol in the doorway of the plane's cockpit as the aircraft sits on the ground at Dulles International Airport near Washington Thursday. Photo was made by Roger Buchanan, 29, of Phoenix, Ariz., a studnet at Arizona State.University, who was a passenger; aboard the plane. Mai: at left is unidentified. Arthur G. Barkley of Phoenix was charged with air pi- racy. (AP Wirepholo) By JAMES It. I'OLK Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP) A frustrated taxpayer with a grudge against ihe government hijacked a jet airliner with 51 passengers and demanded million rnnsom before two pilots capliired him in a tense cockpit gun battle. Hags stuffed with paper tricked the hijacker inlo a sec- ond landing at Dulles Interna- tional Airport where marksmen shot out (lie plane's tires and passengers fled lo safety through window exits minutes before the cockpit gunfire began Thursday nighl. The pilot, Capl. Dale C. Ilupe, was wounded in (he stomach when he tackled the gunman as FBI agents slormcd the TWA 727 jet. Arlliur 0. Barkley, 49, a husky truck driver from Phoe- nix, Ariz., whose lax appeal was rejected by the U.S. Supreme Court only a few weeks ago, was and air piracy. The copilot, Donald Salmon- son, 33, Overland Park, Kan., said, "1 saw his gun go we jumped him immediately." SHlmonson said llune was knocked back into one of Ihe seals and Ihe hijacker "fell on him and had his gun in his stomach. That's when I got the gun and wrenched it away." Hupe was lislcd in good condi- tion at a Fairfax, Va., hospital. Not a passenger was hurl. Salmonson said he was con- vinced Ihe gunman had meant crash the plane and kill ev- eryone aboard even if he had been paid the ransom. Barkley was given as China Advisers Aided Tet Drive By JAY SIURBUTT Associated Press Writer SAIGON (AP) A Viet Cong lieulenant colonel said today that he saw IB Chinese Commu- nist advisers assisting in Ihe planning of Ihe Communist Command's 1968 Tet offensive. Lt. Col. Nguyen Van Nang, who surrendered to government troops May 20 .about 35 miles west of Saigon, said he saw Hie Chinese "every lime" he met with Ihe general slaff of the Communist Command before the offensive. Speaking through a South Vietnamese military interpret- er, Ihe Ihin, 46-year-old man also (old a news conference: Communist Command since 1969 has learned of most U.S. B52 raids in South Vietnam as 24 hours in advance by monitoring allied military radio networks. countrywide Communist offensive scheduled lo start in Hay, including ground attacks on towns and cities, was called off partly because of the allied drives into Cambodia. allied military opera- tions have teen known by Ihe Communist Command from one lo four days before thoy began, including the operation in Cam- bodia. heard thai a number of U.S. soldiers had been captured, taken lo Communist Command headquarters and "treated well" there. Me said he had nev- er seen Ihcm, and he did not say when they were capturd. Nang said he was deputy com- mander fnr an area including one Saigon precinct and seven Brooklyn Cop Wants To Adopt Foundling By MARY ELLEN MYRENK Associated Press Writer NEW. YORK (AP) Brook- lyn policeman Jim Scolt, who rescued a newborn girl aban- doned near death in a hotel wash basin last week, says he wants lo adopt the child. "I think I have more right lo this baby than said 37, the father of three children. "When I felt that child's heartbeat and knew there .was a chance she might live, every- thing around me seemed to he said Thursday night. Scolt answering a call for as- sistance at (ho hotel May 28, found the baby lying molionlcss. The infant was rushed to Ihe Intensive care unit at Relleyuc Hospital, where Kcott has visit- ed her daily at Ihe end of his mldnighl-8 a.m. shift. Unoffi- cially, he has given her the name Kitccn. "I don't want her to go lo court and be raffled said the policeman, who with Ihc aid of a police chaplain has applied to adopt Ihe baby Inrough Ihe Department of Child Welfare. Asst. Welfare Commissioner Robert Carroll said his agency would Invesllgale the wsc and attempt to eliminate "unneces- sary hangups." So far, (tie Sco'lts have been told Ihe baby must be processed through an adoption agency. Scolt and his wife Dolores have a son and two Danny, 1-1; Patricia 11, and Su- san, 7. They own (heir own home in the Flatbush section of Brooklyn. "There's plenly of room for said Scoll, "and more lhan enough love." districts just west of Ihe city. He said he led troops that took purl in the Tet offensive in Feb- ruary i9B8 and tile Hay 1963 of- fensive. He said he saw the Chinese advisers when he met with Ihe general staff of COSVN, Ihe Central Office for South Viet- nam. It is the Communist Com- mand center for all operations in the .southern half of South Vietnam. Nang did not say whether these meetings took place in South Vietnam or across the border in Cambodkt, where al- lied intelligence officers say COSVN's headquarters is dis- persed over 3 wide area. Bui lie said he had never actually been inside COSVN itself. The defector said Ihe offen- sive planned for lasl month was postponed because of Ihe over- throw in March of Cambodia's chief of stole, Prince Norodom Sihanouk, and tfie "highly effcc- live" allied operation against Communist supply and staging areas across the Cambodian border. "The offensive was postponed and diverted against Cambodian troops with Ihc intention of ov- erthrowing the Ixin Nol govern- ment and bringing Sihanouk back lo he said. Ho said Ihe Communists "have Ihe plan" on the future redeployment of U.S. Iroops from South Vietnam, but they know they will have lo contend with a reinforced and strength- ened South Vietnamese army. the first payoff lo a hijacker in air history after the captured jetliner landed here on its flight from Phoenix. But Hie sandy-haired hijacker sent Ihc plane into the air again and ordered a radio message lo President Nixon: "You don't know how to count money The gunman, who radioed oth- er messages lo Ihe Supreme Court, Ihe While House and gov- ernment agencies throughout the eight-hour odysscy, came back for more money after changing his demand lo po- tato sacks each crammed with bills or bigger. "We decided (he people would be in worse danger if the plane took off again. The messages were gelling worse and said airport manager Dan Ma- haney. Two men with shotguns riding on a fire truck (railing Ilic jel- liner as it rolled to a second slop blew out the tires. Passen- gers injured out (lie windows onto Ihe wings. The sluck his head oul of Ihc pilots' cabin and shoulcd, but didn't shoot. He was armed with a .38, a straight edge razor and a can of gasoline, said Mahaney. The passengers dived inlo Hit; grass or hid behind fire trucks as a pair of FHI agenls climbed onto a wing lo enter Ihe plane and the gunman opened fire al them. "llupc hit him low and 1 hit hmi Salmonson said. Barkley, ruddy-faced, his sport coal and gold shhi bolli open to Ihc waist, was led away with his hands locked behind his back. A few hours later, hi! vul- unlcercd "not guilty" as he was formally charged with air pira- offense that can cany (he death penalty. His plea was unofficial. The drama of TWA night 436 Jack Wheeler Dies in Dallas Jack Wheeler, 57, of 1130 Glonwood, prominent. Abilene insuranceman, died al 3 a.m. Friday in the Medical Arts Hospital in Dallas where he was taken Thursday after suffering an apparent hearl attack. Mr. Wheeler, senior partner in the Wheeler-Decgan Insurance Agency, was in Dallas on business. Funeral will be at 3 p.m. Saturday in the Sacred Ileait Catholic Church with Father James Bridges officiating. Burial will he in. Klmwood Memorial Park under direction of Kiker-Warren Funeral Home. Born June 26, 1912, in Carulhersvillo, Mo., he attended public schools in Ballinger and San Antonio. He graduated from high school in San Anlinio and then attended Southern Methodist University. Jlr. Wheeler moved to Abilene in the early 1930s, going to work as an insurance salesman lor (he Cox-Hunter-Hall agency. During World War II, he served in the Army Air Force, rising lo the rank of caplain while stationed at Chanulc Field, m. In 1W6, Wheeler purchased his own agency and in 1957 he merged lo form the Whceler- (Bob) Dccgan Insurance Co. The only son of Mrs. Rufus Wheeler of 2600 Ivanhoc, he married Margaret (Peg) Hannagan in Champaign, 111., in 19-13. He was active in civic affairs and was elected to head the community chest in Abilene in 1954. lie was also head of Ihc Chamber of Commerce cnm- mitlee that raised the necessary funds to construct a new chamber building. Wheeler also served as chair- man for Ihc general solicialion in [he 1352 drive to raise plus needed lo buy the site of Uyess AFB. Survivors include his wife and mother; two daughters, Mrs. WEATHER U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ES5A WEATHER BUREAU (Wealher map, pg. 3A) ABILENE AND VICINITY (40-rnlle radius) Partly cloudy end warm today, lonfghl and Saturday. today In lo.v ?ovr in its upper iDs. H'gh Safwday in 80s. Liqhl arid variable windi. High and low Tar a 74-hour period end'nq at 9 a.m.: 77 and High and for same period lail year; 87 and lail nifihl: p.m.; SUVISG today: a.m.; sunset lonkjht: p.m. JACK WHKiaEIt hear! attack fatal Siegfried Schuster of Houston and Miss Susan Wlicoler of New Orleans, La.; two sons, Gregory and Michael of Abilene; iwo grandchildren, Aiija and JMaya Schuster, both of Houston. The family requests that remcmbcranccs be made to Hie West Texas Rehabilitation Center. Slock Prices NEW YCKK (AP) Stonk market prices dropped sharply in the first half hour of trading loday, shooting downward over D points on the Dow Jones aver- age. By a.m. Ihe Dow aver- age of 30 industrial stocks had plunged 9.45 points lo C97.08. De- clining issues on the New York Slock Exchange outpaced ad- vances by about an 8 to 1 mar- gin- Trading was modoralely ac- tive. The severe drop on Ihe Dow average look it below the 700 level for Ihe first time in a week. The average had closed below Ihc 700 level on May 13 and came back in a spectacular rally llial saw an over 80-point surge over six trading sessions. Analysis said investors were frying fo reap the gains they made (luring the recent rally. Slock market prices also fell sharply on Thursday in active trading. Reds Seize South Korean Boat By K.C. HWANG SEOUL (AP) Two' North Korean speedboats fired on a Soulh Korean naval craft today in Ihc Vellow Sea and look the boa! and all 20 crewmen lo Ihe North, Ihc Sontli Korean De- fense Ministry announced. The incident look place, in wa- ters west of Yonpyong-Do Is- land, 70 miles west of Seoul, the ministry said. The general area is near the seaward extension of the military demarcation Jir.e lhat separates South Korea from the Communist North. Brig. Gen. Ron Young-suh, spokesman for the ministry, said it apparently was a "pre- meditated attack." He described the Soulh Ko- rean craft as a loudspcakcr- mounlcd boat engaged in a rou- tine mission lo protect Soulh Korean fishing boats operating in Ihc area from violating Ihe border line. He did not say whether the South Korean vessel resisted the seizure or whether she sufforn! any casualties or damages in Uie North Korean firing. Defense Minister Chung Nae- hyuk called an emergency meeting of his aides (o study Ihc situation. Among those attend- ing Ihe meeting were the chief of naval operations, Adm. Chang Chi-soo and Lt. Gen. Yoo Kcun-chang, countcr-infillralion commander. The naval incident took place while a Cambodian good will mission was in Seoul lo seek military assistance. South Ko- rea lias said it was ready lo pro- vide fionmilifnry assistance to Cambodia but not mililary help at Inis slagc. x This was the first lime a Soudi Korean naval vessel had been seized by North Korea since the armistice went into ef- fect July 27, 1953. Naval battles have been fough! by Xorlh Korean naval vessels or infiltration boats and South Korean navy ships. Tn one of these incidents, a 650-ton Eoulh" Korean palrol craft was sunk off the cast coast by Communist shnre battery fire Jan. 10, 1967. Thirty-nine of 70 crewmen aboard were, either killed or missing, and 30 others were wounded in Uie incident. began in (ho morning skies over New Mexico when (lie hijacker emerged from a rcslroom and told pretty brown-haired stew- ardess Robyn Unca, 21, who was on her iiexl-to-lasl flight, that he wanted lo sec Ihc pilot. "He pulled out his gun and showed il lo me. I said OK and knocked on UK the stew- ardess" said. Many of passengers didn't know tile plane had been com- mandeered, not even when it skipped a sclpdulort ftdp at St. Louis. Bad weather was used as an excuse. "The atmosphere was not tense. You could call it a suu- diicri cocktail college student Christopher Smith said laler. The rcd-iind-whitc jet rolled lo its first Dulles Airport slop at the cud of a runway and was re- fueled while KHI agents slaved a quarter-mile away. The ransom, raised hurried- ly at two nearby banks, sat in sight of the plane in a brown canvas bag. After an hour's wail, veteran international pilot Capl. Billy N. Williams, who bad taken over another hijacked TWA jet on a flight lo Home lasl fall, arrived from New York and carried the money on board. "lie ciil the bag Wil- liams said. "Unfortunately the first bag was bills." The gunman abruptly ordered the plane into the air again. Within mimilos after takeoff, he radioed, "Is the President ready 10 lullil! my request? That re- quest was for S100 million." Williams said he was certain the gunman meant to destroy Ihe money, destroy the aircraft and destroy all the people aboard. Tile jel airliner started sonlli (hen lurnoil and sped north, going as far as Klmira, N.Y., Ihen turned around again when 11 got beyond radio range, and started back for Washington. .lames A. ISulch, a passenger from Evansvillc, Ind., said: "We headed north and we all said il's got to be Russia. We beaded soulli and we said it's got lo be Cuba. We headed north again and we were all confused. "We wore all lulling on it. Nobody won. We came right back here." The exlra-long jet airliner, will) its loud of hoslagcs includ- ing a six-day-old baby and an elderly woman with a heart con- dition, wandered around the ov- ercast skies above Ihe nation's capital for a full hour wailing for Hie now money sacks lo be placed by Ihc runway. TWA, which had raised the original ransom, filled them with shredded paper. As (he airliner rolled lo a slop down a runway Iwo miles from the modcrnislic main terminal, two policemen following Ihe plane on a fire truck shot oul Die four huge tires. Anolher fire truck pulled in front of Ihe jel, blocking it. "We were surprised to see the people suddenly coming out of Ibe plane through emergency a government offi- cial said. A passenger, Dick Gillen of Los Angeles, said, "Next thing I knew lliere were fire engines all around and guys with rifles and telescopes and they shouted lo get Iwhind the fire trucks. I pulled my wife behind a big tire." Mahaney threw a pistol up lo pilot Williams who had gone lo a rear door of the plane lo in- spect the money bags on the hi- jacker's orders. Despite orders from the gun- man lo shut Ihe doors, Williams said he stalled while most of the passengers fled. Then, ivilli Ihe smuggled gun, he started back up the lo shoot the hijacker. The FHI charged first, and SalmonEon and llupc, alone in Ihc cockpit with Rarklcy, leaped on him. The copilot recalled (he gunman had mumbled earlier in Ilia flight, "N'o man should die alone." Supreme Court records show (in income lax appeal by an Anther G. Barkley with Ihe snmc I'liponix address was turned without a hearing in March. The appeal involved a govern- ment lax claim that Barkley owes from his lax return of six years ago. Barkley argued in his appeal that he was "being held a 'slave' by Ihe United Slates." ARTHUR G. BAttKLEY cliargcd in hijacking Bv ELLIE HtCKER and BETTY GR1SSOM What Are Wages Of Postal Workers? The wages of our postal workers have been In Ihe, news lately. Congress Is working on a pay raise for federal wnrkcrs. Can you please give a comparison of the postal pay scale and (he oflicr civil service workers' nay scale in a similar working position? For example compare a postal employe hi level five, 10 years service to Ihc equivalent In federal workers' pay, A. This puls a severe strain on Action Line's nun mallicnialical brain; it's difficult to compare the (ivn without a long detailed explanation. Briefly though, here goes: for Ihc first three years Uie pay scale is identified, when a federal worker waits Iwo years Ireforc reaching the next pay level, while n postal worker can reach it in one year. A postal employe at level five with years service makes a civil service makes but tins isn't always sen-ice employe at level five, nine years true as salary depends on Ihe level of difficulty of Ihc job. Q. Several years ago, on an anniver- sary. I insisted that all t wanted was a spinning wheel. Finally wheels were located and f chose a small flax wheel. I now want tn learn to spin on it. Is there anyone In (his area lhat spins, so lessons could he arranged? One man al Rising Siar has spun on the Great wheel or wool wheel but, as jel, no one knows about one like mine. A. We found a couple of people who could operale a spinning wheel but not a flax wheel. There may be someone in the area bill after days of looking, we gave up Ihc search and called the Abilene Public Library. The March 19G6 Issue of Popular Mechanics magazine has an article lhat may be of some help. If someone notifies us of Ilieir ability to operate a we'll let you know. 
                            

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