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Abilene Reporter News: Wednesday, June 3, 1970 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - June 3, 1970, Abilene, Texas                                gfeflene WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT Byron 89TII YEAR, NO. 350 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, WEDNESDAY EVENING, JUNE 3, PAGES IN THREE SECTIONS Associated Press SUNDAY Wallace: Victory a Warning President Must 'Halt Interference With Southern Schools' VICTORIOUS Former Alabama Gov. George Wallace addresses supporters at his victory headquarters in Montgomery after he defeated Alabama Gov. Albert Brewer in a runoff election for the Democratic nomina- tion. Behind Wallace is his daughter, Lee, giving a vic- tory sign. (AP Wkephoto) By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS George C. Wallace has won Hie Democratic nomination for gov- victory which he says is a warning lo President Nixon from "all the people in Ihc South to hall federal interfer- ence willi Southern schools. Al tlie same lime Jess Unruh claimed the Democratic nomina- tion and will run against Gov. Ronald Reagan in California. Wallace pulled from behind lo defeat Gov. Albert Brewer in Tuesday's runoff primary. Virtually complete returns gave the former governor and 10C8 presidential candidate votes, or 51.51 per cent, Brewer or 48.49 per cent. The nomination is tantamount lo election since the Republi- cans are unlikely to run a candi- date in November. Brewer said lie knew all along lie couldn't win if "race and a hale campaign" became the major it did be- come the main issue." He called it "the dirtiest campaign I've ever seen in Alabama." Wallace had blamed wlial lie called a Negro "Woe vole'1 for his failure to win the nomination in the first primary May 5 and had predicted unified black sup- port for Brewer in the vmiofl. Brewer had a lead of almost voles in the [irst primary but failed to win a majority in (lie seven-man field. In California, Unruh, a slimnied-down version of Ihc man known as "Big Daddy" while speaker of the slate's As- sembly in the mid-1960s, easily outdistanced Mayor Sam Yorty of Los Angeles. Reagan was un- opposed for Republican rcnomi- nation. That stale's bailie of two anti- war Democrats saw Rep. John V. Tunncy, son of Cornier heavy- weight boxing champion Gene Tiinney, anead of Rep. George E. Brown Jr., who once threat- ened lo launch impeachment proceedings against President Develops as 200th Plans Leak Out By CARL C. CRAFT Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP) A ma- jor hubbub has developed over a presidential panel's nol-so-se- cvel ideas on where to toss the nation's 200tli birthday parly. Some of the plan leaked out despite the American Revolu- tion Bicentennial Commission's hopes oE keeping it secret foe President Nixon to announce next July 41h. The fracas began after the commission reportedly dropped a draft proposal to concentrate (he 197C celebration in four cit- ies, with the Continental Con- gress city of Philadelphia hold- ing an international exposition. The oilier cities were Boston, Washington and Miami, Fla. Pennsylvania's senators, He- publicans Hugh Scott and Rich- ard S. Schwciker, said Tuesday Dial plan had been scrapped "for reasons not clear lo us." They said the commission had decided lo hold informal cele- brations throughout the nalion LIMA, Pem (AP) Bad weather and blocked roads con- tinued to hamper efforts today to get rescue workers into lire earthquake-shattered Huaylas Canyon high in the Peruvian Andes. The (owns of Yungay, Caraz South Viets Airlift Aid !o Mountain SAIGON (AP) Five hun- dred South Vietnamese troops made a helicopter assault today lo link up with the weary de- fenders of a mountain ridge ar- tillery base battered by two days of attacks in the northwest corner of South Vietnam. Following up an early morn- ing hammering by U.S. bombers, American and South Vietnamese fighter-bombers dropped antipersonnel cluster bombs on lower ridgelines with- in half a mile of. beleaguered Firebase Tun Tavern, while I he relief force flew into a landing zone about tlie same distance from Hie base on the opposite side. Field reports said there was no resistance as the reinforce- ments and their U.S. advisers joined the remnants of Tim Tav- ern's defenders lo begin a Sweep around the base. At noon, North Vietnamese mortar crews were still hurling shells into the helicoplsr pad of the kidney-shaped outpost four miles east of the Laolian border as American medical helicop- ters wheeled in to lake out the dead and wounded. One helicopter was hit and de- stroyed this morning. _______ Market Mixed NEW VORK (AP) Slocks opened mixed in moderately ac- tive trading today. Winning issues on the New York Slock Exchange led losers by a 2 lo 1 margin. 'Opening prices on I he Big Board's most active list includ- ed Monslamo, oft 1 7-8 at 31; Becton, Dickinson, up Hi ad 4114; FMC, up '-4 at and CNA Financial preferred A, up >4 at 18V4. and Huaraz in the canyon were almost totally destroyed in Hie earthquake which rumbled through half of Peni Sunday. Government officials feared as many as people were killed, but broken communica- tions still prevented anything like an accurate talty of casual- lies. In Yungay, about 240 miles north of Lima, only resi- dents reportedly survived out of Hie population of a high government official said. Information Director Auguslo Zimmerman said many people who ran into Ihc narrow streets of tlie Andean villages and towns were killed by falling rocks and debris from the can- yon walls. A surging tide of wa- ter from Lake Llanganuco add- ed lo the destruction. The air force managed lo drop a squad of 34 rescue work- ers Tuesday al Huaraz, at Ihc south entrance of the gorge. It followed up with several more supply drops deeper in the can- yon and made a few helicopter evacuations before the weather closed in. v.'Hh no dominant centers and only limited international parti- cipation. Scolt and Schwciker fired off a letter to commission Chairman J. K. Wallace Sterling asking for an urgent meeting of ttie pi.nel lo reconsider They said Ihc four-city plan had been drawn up by the com- mission's executive committee but somehow never presented to Ihe full commission. Tlie plan eventually adopted, they said, was one "conceived by slaff and considered in an in- foniial discussion between some members of the slaff and a few commission members the prior evening." They did not say exaclly when the commission had aclcd. The spjialors want lo keep alive Philadelphia's hopes for landing ?.n international exposi- tion. They said il is "mil clear whether the programming ener- gy and financial resources lo promote the commission's con- cept of national activilics could be found wilhout some focal puinl to encourage both Ihe nec- essary congressional appropria- tions and the mutual coopera- 'tion of leadership which will be needed lo make any bicenten- nial observance successful." A source close to the commis- sion said Ihc substitute plan ac- ceplcd by the panel is, in effect, "a big birthday parly lied lo lil- lle extends the parly ralher than restricting it." NEWS INDEX Amuserr.enls 6A Brirtqc................5A Classified 8-12B Comics 7B Editorials 6B Horoscope 5A Hospital Palicnls........4A Obiluarics 2A Sporls 9-1 IA To Your Good Health 5B TV Log...............4B Women's News........2.3B SOMETHING TO TELL THE KIDS ABOUT Tlie tiger is trained, and he's on a chain, but eight-year-old Brandon Cruz has something lo tell the neighborhood kids about when he gels borne. Brandon appears in the TV series "The Courtship of Eddie's and he spoiled Sar- ang, also a film worker, between scenes at MGM's studio in Hollywood. (AP Wirephoto) Nixon because of the U.S. at- tack into Cambodia. The winner faces incumbent Sen. George Murphy, the one- lime aclor and dancer, who de- leated millionaire industrialist Norton Simon in the GOP pri- mary. Murphy is a slrong sup- porter of President Nixon's poli- cies in Southeast Asia. With 51 per cent of the stale's precincts counted, the secretary of state's lally snowed: Unruh Yorly In Ihe senate contest, the 35- year-old Tunney, considered the more moderate, started attack-, ing the 50-year-old Brown in the last two weeks "of the campaign after polls showed him behind his more outspoken opponent. In the GOP senatorial contest, Simon spent an estimated million, most of it on television and newspaper advertising, aft- er jumping inlo the race against Murphy at Uie last moment. With 51 per cent of pre- cincts counted Tunney had Brown Murphy Simon The year's busiest political day so far, wilh balloting in eight slates, saw the renomina- lion of four Democratic senators Leader Mike Mans- field of Montana, .loin C. Slen- nis _of Mississippi, Harrison A. Williams Jr. o[ New Jersey and Joseph M. Monloyn of New Mexico. Besides Reagan, two other Republican governors were rc- D. Kay of Iowa, who was unopposed, and Frank Farrar of South Dakota. In Ihe day's only major upsel, Gov. David Cargo of New Mexi- co was defeated lor the Republi- can senatorial nomination by Anderson Carter, a conservative rancher and oil man, wlio now faces Monloya, victorious over former stale Hep. Richard Ed- wards. In New Jersey, Williams, a 2- lo-l victor over slate Sen. Frank .1. Guarini, will meet Nelson G. Gross, former slate Republican chairman. CBS Believes Body Newsman's NEW YORK (AP) The Columbia Broadcasting System reported today (hat a body found in a freshly dug grave in Cambodia is believed lo be that of missing CBS newsman (leorge Syvcrlsen. CliS quoted a cable from Saigon Bureau manager David Miller and colleagues that Ihey "believe I hoy found Ihc body" of Syvertscn in a grave about SO yards from Cambodia Route 3. The clothing on Ihe body, Jlillcr said, led lo the belief it was Syvcrlsen. Still missing, along wilh a team of three National Broadcasting Co. men, is producer-newsman Gerald Miller. The jeep that Syvertsen and Gerald Miller had bfien using, CHS said, was found 'burn- ed out" not far from where the hotly was discovered. Syvertscn, 38, joined CBS in January 19GC, and has been covering Hie Vietnam war on a rotating basis since Prior lo thai, he served in New York and Moscow, and was Washington producer of the CBS morning television news program. A native of New York City, Syverlscn was graduated from Columbia University and majored in Soviet affairs. Scientists Create Gene First Time in Laboratory MADISON, Wis. (AP) Scientists have created a gene iii Ihe laboratory, a feat that raises questions about the possi- bility of starting life itself in a lest lube. The announcement of the first man-made basic unit of heredity that controls all life made Tuesday by a learn headed by a Nobel Prize winner, Dr. H. Gobind Khorana. The University of Wisconsin "WEATHER WEATHER BUREAU (Weather map, pg. ABILENE AND VrCINFTY (40-mile radiyi) Clfrar lo partly cloudy and irrld and Thursday. The high lodav near 80, low 5V HICT Thjrsrfay aboul 85. Windi variable oul cf the rwlh-rwlheasl around 10 m.g.h. High arrf low for 24-houn ending al a.m.: 76 and 5J. Hiqh and low for same pericd vr-ar: IS and 57. Sunael lail niqnl: p.m.; sur-rlse today: n.m.; sw.scf lonlghl: team said genes can be made completely from simple organic chemicals. Khorana, who won a 1MB No- bel for earlier work on the ge- netic code, said the new work might eventually allow scien- tists lo manipulate Ihe biology of a living system. Some scientists have said in ll.e past that it might be 25 lo 100 years before Ihis now knowl- edge of genetics can be put lo work in man. The first likely application would be in genetic engineering infecting humans with viruses lhat carry new genes, genes Ihal would cure he- reditary diseases such as hemo- philia. By making and giving substi- tute genes, man may be able to make people smarter or taller. .Scicnlists may be able to lura off (he growth of cancer cells. A first simple life form that Why Were Trash Containers Moved? Bv BLUE IHJCKliR and BKTTy GRISSOM Q. Why have the (rash containers removed frnin the Iticliland and No. Mill location? We in (lie neighborhood need these containers tor grass clippings and other throw-away IIKer, other than garbage. I nnllcrd a short lime ago a picture in the newspaper showing liller around the containers. The clly remedies Ihis silualion removing the hin containers we had. Why didn't (he clly just add one or two more containers? Surely, (liny could see Ihe problem. Is liny we taxpayers mild get sufficient containers at or near this location? A. The two containers were moved clown the slrcct two blocks, (the IfiOO block ot nichland) lo a more suitable localion, Charles iS'olcn of Ihe City Refuse Depart- ment says. The city has 41 public service containers in 30 different locations al Ihc present and is financially unable lo furnish any more, Nolcn says. 'i II costs the cily about a year lo collect from the ones now being used and il receives no revenue (or them, he says. Q. I know of at least two letters (hat have been mailed (o me lhat I did not get and one (hat I mailed (hat did not arrive. They all had the correct poslage and address including the I thought .vein could rtcpend on the mail service. Makes me wonder how many more I haven't received. However, I haven't missed gelling any bills. A. When it's realized a letter has been lost in Ihe mail Ihe post office should be notified at once and usually il shows up if il had the correct address, poslage, a n d a return address, says Mel Laync, customer relations representative of the Abilene Post Office. If there's no poslage on (he Idler Ihe receiver is charged upon delivery or a nntics is left in the box indicating an attempt, lo deliver had been made. When the address is incorrect it's sent back to the return address if there's one on the envelope. If not, it's scnl to the dead loiter branch in Dallas. There it's opened by an official and a wilness lo determine the identificalion of Ihe sender or inlcnded receiver. H a name or address ol either is found in Ihe letlcr it is then re-enveloped and forwarded wilh a ten ccnl charge. Q. I have always been of the opinion that when driving a car around a corner, our is supposed In slay In (he lane into which he is turning until the traffic warrants his changing lanes. Twice each day I almost gel run over al the corner of Hickory and No. 2nd. I am turning [eft off Hickory N. 2nd. anil persons turning right off Hickory onlo N. 2nd almost run me Inlo (lie curb as they turn the comer and come all the way over inlo the south lane on N. 2nrt. Am I right or wrong, do 1 have the right ol way In lell lane, or do the persons turning right have Ihe rlghl ot way In Ihe left lane? I think a patrolman should be station- ed at Ihis Intersection. A. Patrolman Noel Johnston, of Ihe Abilene Police Dopt., says you have the right-of-way. When making a right lurn you should stay in the right lane; when making a left lurn the car should stay as far as possible in the left lane in a one way street and lo Ihc center in a two-way street. it would be impossible lo put a patrolman at every Irouble corner in Ihe cily, he says, bul this one will be checked. Q. Do you know of anyone tn Abilene who could restore a player piano? How much would it cost? Also, would anyone Jiavc parts lo do II yourself? A. There is only one person in Abilene lhat we were able lo locate, Ihal is still in the business. Charles Tidwell may be reached by calling 673-4VC1 but you will have to put your name on a waiting list and then it may be six months before he can get to it. Tiriwell said il takes several weeks lo rebuild a player and it will cost you about This includes refinishing the cabinet, repairing the piano action or new parts, installing an electric pump, etc., lie says, and the charge could be cut down. It would be almost impossible to rebuild it yourself, he says, but it has been done. There is a woman here in Abilene who repaired player pianos al one time but because of poor health she retired. Aildrcss 
                            

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