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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - June 1, 1970, Abilene, Texas                                abflene Reporter- WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT YEAR, NO. 348 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, MONDAY EVENING, JUNE 1, TWENTY-SIX PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS Associated Preu (ff) lOc SUNDAY MORTARBOARD ;PROTEST .Vassar. College peace symbols .in. lieu of. more strident forms seniors, Ih'eU-mortarboards'pinned with'peace of protest-Which-they-turned down in a class at'their commencement in Pough- vote. (AP Wirepholo) keep'sie, N.Y., Sunday. Tlie seniors wore the Peru Quake Dead Said in Hundreds LIMA, Peru (AP) Hundreds were feared dead in Peru to- day- following a massive earth- quake that devastated commu- nities along a 600-mile stretch Band of Sioux Clean 'Thunder Sticks' WASHINGTON (AP) In what sounds like a switch from the days' when the cavalry fought the Indians across the Western frontier, the Army is furnishing a Sioux tribe wilh thousands of rifles. There's nothing warlike about this gun trading. On the. con- trary, the Army is trying to help Ihe Indians better their lot un- der- a program aimed at chan- neling'income-producing work to minority groups. The Army Weapons Command has contracted with Fort Peck, Mont. Tribal Industries, organ- ized by the Assiniboine Sioux, to repair and refurbish about MM rifles. Officials said tlie Fort Peck organization was given Ihe Army rifle repair job because it had a successful record under a previous contract to fix up carbines for the Air Force. The Army is paying 519.75 per rifle, which works oul to a tolal cost of for the job. The government furnishes the parts. The Indians take the rifles apart, clean them, and replace worn components. Then each weapon is tested. "The results so far are excel- a spokesman said. "The rifes are returned lo the Army as good as new." This is not the only military- sponsored "bootstrap" project under way. Indians of Ihe Northern Chey- enne Reservation in Montana are making canteen covers, offi- cials said. Some of Uiese Indians have been living on Incomes averag- ing a year, they said. of the, coast. Radio Panamericana reported 140 dead in Huaras, a city of in tlie snoiv-capped Andes 175 miles north of Lima. The Peiuvian Red Cross said 90 pel- cent of the homes and commer- cial buildings were destroyed Sunday in the quake and at least five after shocks. Some 35 miles to Ihe north- west, the slum-ridden coastal city of Chimbote had al least lo killed and terrible destruction, officials reported. Chimbote was a sleepy fishing village until a few years ago, but the new fish- meal industry has attracted thousands of Indians lo work in the faclorics. The Peruvian Geophysical In- stitute said the quake struck al p.m. KST, with its epicen- ter211 miles northwest of Lima and 12 miles offshore from Chimbote. The institute said ihe tremor was 7.75 on Ihe Richter scale and 8 on Ihe Mercaii scale, intense enough to cause "grave damage." Peru's last disastrous quake, on Oct. 17, 1966, killed 175 per- sons and left more than homeless. It registered 7.5 on the Richter scale. Officials said it might be days before an accurate assessment of deaths and property damage could be made. In Lima damage was slight and injuries few. One person died of a heart attack attributed (o the earthquake. Limans are always aware of the possibility of a quake and generally react well by seeking open areas or standing bonealh reinforced doorways. But hundreds ran into the streets screaming as buildings began lo rock. NEWS INDEX Amusements 4B Bridge................5B Classified.......... 10-13B Comics 9B Editorials 8B Horoscope............. 8A Hospital Poticnls........3A Obituaries 2A Sporls 10-12A To Your Gcod Hcollh------AB TV Loo.............. 13B Women's News'........2, 3B Fuel Mistake Blamed in Crash ATLAOTA, (AP) Federal investiga- tors say jet fiicl was poured by mistake into the tanks of a gasoline-burning aircraft which crashed on' a highway, killing six persons. John Heed, chairman of tlie National Transportation Safety Board, said Sunday 200 gallons of the jet fuel were added to tanks containing 400 gallons of gasoline before the Martin 401 twin-engined aircraft 'lock off Saturday from DcKalb-Peach-lree Airport. The pilot Iried lo set Ihe privalcly owned plane down on a highway near Atlanta when power failed in both engines. The plane hit a car, killing all five occupants. A plane passenger also was killed. "It would be similar to putting four or five gallons of kerosene in a 20-gallon automobile said Heed. "The aircraft would run properly on this mix." Heed said two workers who fueled the plane told investigators they thought it had turbojet engines, which run on jet fuel. The plane, carrying 30 passengers, was bound for a weekend real estate company sales excursion to Ft. Myers, Fla. Cloudburst Drops Up to 3.60 Here By BRENDA. GREENE Reporter-News Slaff Writer A natural fireworks display over Abilene in UK: early morning haul's sent sheets of blinding rain into the city, caushing flooding in some areas, power failures, and wind gusts up to 53 m.p.h. which caused some isolated damage. Although the ESSA Weather Bureau at Abilene Municipal Airport recorded only 1.94 inches of rain from a.m. to a.m., gauges in other parts of the city showed as niuch as 3.60 at 808 Ballinger, 3.41 inches at 517 Glenhaven and 2.37 inches at Dycss AFB. Light hail was reported in the Capehart housing area at Dycss but a spokesman said there was lillle or no damE. Police spent a busy night, aiding stalled cars in high water throughout the cit and helping direct traffic where traffic lights were oul. All the underpasses filled with water only about an hour after the downpour began.and streol department crews and police had them closed by 3 a.m. The Pine St., underpass at N. 1st was open about B a.m., according to police but others remained closed, and Street Superintendent Charlie While said they would probably be closed most of Ihe day. Several IIOUECS in the 1500 block of Kirkwood in Norlh Abilene flooded from over- viewing waters of Catclaw Creek and police kept a careful watch in that area from about unli] about a.m. in case evacuation was necessary. However, the water bcgan- rcceding al a.m. according to police. In Ihe Carver addition, usually hit hardest by flooding in barracaded by a street crew as Cedar Creek rose to threatening heights and White said the area would probably be closed nlil tomorrow, "providing we don't get any more rain." In North Abilene, Old Anson Road rear Impact was under water and it .was closed lo traffic. "Of course there were man impassable but weren't able to Ballinger Soldier Killed in Combat BALLINGER Arrange- ments are pending for-Griny Lynn Spieker, 24. who was killed in Vietnam Friday. Mr. Spieker had been in Vietnam since November. He entered the Army in January 1969. A 1D64 graduate of Ballinger High School, he attended IBM school in Dallas before entering the service. Survivors include his parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. M. (Fritz) Spieker of Ballingcr, and a brother, Don, a student at Norlh Texas State University in Denton. Notification of his death came Sunday. lie was serving with Company D, 5th Infantry in Quang Tri. close them While said. Reports from the 800 block of Sunset near Calciaw Creek in South Abilene indicated that flooding threatened several homes in that area, but Ihe water receded before any damage occurred. Police received reports that traffic lights were out at S. Hlh and Barrow, 2nd and Walnuf and N. 12th and Mockingbird and a patrolman was sent to direct traffic at the Mockingbird inter- section Monday morning. West Texas Utilities Co. cr3ws worked during the night to restore power that was knocked out during the electrical storm. Although there was some Isolated trouble throughout Abilene, A. D. Green said, three distribution feeders were knocked out by lightning about West gate sen'icc area, the River Oaks area and N. 7iii feeder which affected only parts of downtown. Green said that ho had all Ms local people working to restore the power failures, but that they shouldn't need any outside help. A plateglass window at ttie Goodyear Store at 151 Pioneer was cblown out during the night. H suffered similar damages in a, thunderstorm which hit Abilene about a month ago. Slight wind damage was re- ported in other areas including tree that had blown down on N. 10th and Green and blocked tarffic for a few minutes, police said. Officially Abilene received 1.94 during the night, bringing the total rainfall for the year to 12.47 inches, 2.70 inches above the normal. And the rain may not be over yet as the Weather Bureau forecast calls for a 60 per-cent chance of rain Monday. The temperature should be about 70 Monday and Tuesday wilh a 50- degree. reading predicted Monday night. TRAILERS BLOWN OVER 3.75 at Roscoe Most Rain as Area Drenched Power driven rains lashed and drenched area towns and counties as turbulent thunderstorms moved across the West Texas plains early Monday morning. Roscoe was lops wilh 3.75-inch of rain, accompanied by higH winds. In Ihe'Bandera area ol Roscoe high waters were still standing early Monday morning around the Ironies in the area. Telephone communication was hampered by the stormy weather, according to one report. Sylvester was whipped by high winds, and recorded 3.50-inch of WEATHER U.S COMMERCE DEPARTMENT ESSA WEATHER BUREAU (Wtlthcr mip, pg. J-A) ABILENE AWD VICINITY (40-mile radius] CJotjdy and cool with scfillercd itwuers Monday, wilh tfecredsing cloudi- ness Monday night. r.4igh Monday 73. low 5i and high Tuesday rear 70. Prcbabillty ol rain h per cenl Monday wllh winds from the norlh 5-13 m.p.h. and tow for 21-houn ending al V -m.: E4 and il. Klflh and low lor same period tasl year: 13 and 5P. Sunset tasl nlgnl: D.m.; lodav: a.m.; aunscl tonlQhl: p.m. rain. Four miles norUi of Sylvester reported an unofficial 4 inches. In Big Spring three unconfirm- ed tornadoes reportedly danced through tlie area, blowing over five trailers. Weslbrook, which recorded 2.10-inch of rain, suffered high winds that uprooted small trees, toppled TV anlennaes and caused some damage lo crops in the area. in Blackweli, it was thunder and lightning and the "worst winds so far this said one observer who placed tlie rain fall at 1.10 inch. Paint Rock reported nearly the same, describing the wind as "scary." Rainfall was less than an inch .45. Tuscola reported liigh winds and rain at 1.60. Market Higher NEW YORK (AP) Slocks opened higher in moderately ac- live trading today. Winners led losers by a wide margin. All 3 Lakes Here Go Over Spillway All Ihree o; Abilene's lakes are full and going over Ihe spillway, Water Supt. Bill Weenis said Monday morning. Together they hold 27.3 billion gallons, easily -.a three-year supply of water even considering the evaporation (actor. Lake Foil Phantom got the least amount of rain in the 24 hour period ending at 8 a.m. Monday .15 of an inch.' Weenis said it was go'ing'over the spillway by about'.3 foot. "It'll go over a week or two weeks the way everything's he said. Phantom holds 22.6 billion gallons. Lake Kirby got 1.85 inches of rain and was just starling to go over the spillway early Monday morning. Kirby and Lake Abilene both hold 2.35 billion gallons. Lake Abilene got tlie most rainfall 1.91 inches and is going over the spillway about half a foot, Weems said. He said it was going over one spillway which is something like a morning-glory spillway by .5 foot but is not going over Ihe emergency spillway, which is three feet higher. Ill Bulfab Gap, one of the few place to report hail, 1.50 rain hit the, ground and the high winds snapped some limbs off trees. IT ABILENE i Municipal Airport 1.34 Total for Year.......... 12.47 Noraia for Year 9.71 2041 Butternut.......... 2.60 1810 Meadowbrook...... 3.25 1026 Cedar 250 1231 Westmoreland 3.00 682 NE 15th 2.50 8S8 Ballinger 3.60 517 Glenhaven 3.41 3134 S. 10th............. 3.30 Dyess APB............... 2.87 ALBANY ..............10 ANSON ................70 BAIRD ................50 BALLINGER 1.00 BLACKWELL 1.10 BRECKEN1UDGE .....13 BUFFALO GAP 1.50 CLYDE 1.00 COLEMAN 1.40 COLORADO CITY 1.60 EASTLAND ............10 GORMAN...............1.40 IIASKELL .............09 HAW LEY .30. KNOXC1TY .01 LAWN 1.39 MERKEL 1.09 Norlh of Merkel........ 3.50 PAINT ROCK PUTNAM ..............60" RANGER Tr. RISING STAR 1.50 ROBY 1.36 ROSCOE.............. 3.75 HOWENA 2.50 RULE................ .10 SNYDER 1.15 STAMFORD .10 SWEETWATER 2.00 SYLVESTER 3.50 TUSCOLA 1.60 WEINERT ............08 WKSTBflOOK 2.10 WINTERS 1.40 VFW Poppy Sale Date Questioned By ELLIE RUCKER and RtTTY GRISSOM Q. Why Is H the VHV Invariably chooses Saturdays to sell their popples? Virtually all offices arc closed, as well as all banks, (he post office and many Independent relallcrs..1 noticed In (he R- N (he VF1V raised about last year. I am of the opinion that figure could be quadrupled on a Friday. A. Mrs. W. C. Mulhcrn, president of the Ladies Auxiliary of the VFW, said the entire week was declared Buddy Poppy Week. The main days for selling the poppies were Friday.and Saturday. Buddy Poppy Day is usually held on or as close to Memorial Day (Saturday) as possible. The volunteers who sell Ihe poppies also have lo work on Friday and thai is another reason they are usually sold on Saturday, she says. We easv Kilillc Arnold on television the other night and were wondering how long he had been singing. He was very popular when I was a child and that was twenty, years ago. Just how old Is he, anyway? A. Arnold was born May 15, 1918 in Henderson, Tenn. He started picking and singing at the age of 9. He got his first radio job when he was 18 and at the same time worked as an ambulance and funeral service driver. His pay was 25 cents for each call and free lodging at the funeral parlor. In 1943 he became a regular on the Grand Ole Oprj'i which attracted big name western and counlry performers. By the end of the '40s he was Victor Records' best selling recording artisl. In 1350 his popularity began to decline but took a decided upswing in 1065 as he began to modify and urbanize his counlry style, attracting a broader audience. Q. Teenagers have many and varied problems and need our sspport and help. Cnuld we have a 24-hour counseling service geared to (ecnagcrs similar lo the Sulclrte Prevention? A. "Hot Line" provides this service, thanks to combined efforts of the Abilene Mental Health Assn. and the Kiwanls clubs. The service is available on Friday and Saturday nights from 8 p.m. (o midnight lo any young person with any type of problem that he needs lo discuss, gel information, or be advised on. The purpose of the "Hot Line" is lo listen to the problem and refer the caller lo the proper authorily or person best qualified lo advise or help solve Ihe problem. At other times during the week the Suicide Prevention Service may be called. Q. In regard to the question In May I31h's paper about adopting while or Mark children, you said Inter-racial adoption was not allowed according (o slate law and then said a 1367 case held that the section was unconstitutional. I am confused as (o Ihe correct answer. Also, If It Is Illegal why? A. It isn't illegal. The civil courts of appeal of 1907 declared the section of the Texas law, in regard lo inter-racial adoption, unconslilulional. The Texas law was ruled to be a denial of the equal rigiiis protection of the Ulh Ammcndmcnt of Ihe U.S. Constitution that was passed after Ihe Civil War. Adoptive parents of any race may adopt a child of any race. Q. Hurray for (he new skating rink that will open soon! Can you find out If this will be run In a way thai will allow Chrlsllans lo attend? The last rink permitted short skating costumes and shorts; therefore we conld not use If for church parlies unless they were booked privately. A. The new rink at 201 N. Shelton is now open and H. K. Baker, owner and operator, says he is enforcing several rules..Girls will rift be allowed lo wear short shorts, T-shirls or sweat shirts and boys must have long shirt tails lucked in and have their hair neat. Parents will be allowed lo watch their children without charge but everyone else who comes in must skate, he says. Special parlies may be booked privately, in, ad- vance, or come during regular hours but will be given special rates for a certain number. The rink will not be 'opened on Sunday night but may be booked for after church parlies. Address quesllons lo Action Line, Box 30, Ahllcnc, Texas 79614. Names Hill not be used but questions must be signed and addresses, given. Please Isclade telephone number It possible. _   

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