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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: May 26, 1970 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - May 26, 1970, Abilene, Texas                                "WITHOUT OR WITH'OFFENSE TO.FRIENDS.OR FOES'WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT. 89TH YEAR, NO. 342 PHONE 673-4271 ABILENE, TEXAS, 79604, TUESDAY EVENING, MAY 26, 1970 PAGES IN.TWO SECTIONS Associated Preu SUNDAY ISSUE ON FREEDOM OF ASSEMBLY Louisiana Senate Sides 11 if f Long Hairs BATON ROUGE, La. .The Louisiana Senate has clodd- ed thai .the "right of young peo- ple to hold, a pop festival is just as revered as the right of the lAiiiiie Baptist Church to hold a prayer meeting." Tlib decision came Monday as the Senate voted 16 22 to defeat a bill designed to give the Parish police Jury the power to stop the Festival of Man and Earth, a pop conceit planned for the Memorial Day weekend. The vole followed almost three hours cf debate and manuever- ing by bolh supporters and op- poncnis of the measure, which prompted wide differences opinion on the constitution gu- arantees of freedom of assem- bly. Specifically, the bill-by Sen. Crady Stewart of AlbanyTwould give local governing authorities the right to deny permits for gatherings of more than persons for "good cause." "I wish I could go along with- this said Sen. Bennet Johnston of Shreveport. "I can under- stand the fears of the people of Livingston Parish. But there is a lot more involved in this bill than a pop festival'. "What is involved .here is one of our most basic, right ol freedom of assembly.. Freedom of speech and assem- bly does not mean anything if people who have unpopular views cannot speak or meet. "It doesn't mean anything if only the people who agree with government, can speak. It means the people with long hair can speak with the people with short hair.- It means the. hawks can speak with the doves. Or when the right of young people to hold a pop festival is just as revered as the right of the Amile Bap- tist Church to hold a prayer meeting." Sen. Jamar Adcock of Monroe compared the bill to.segregalion legislation passed by the legis- lature in the early 1960s. "This Senate is trying to out- law .something that we don't like and that is what has wrong with Louisiana and the South- land for too he said. "We have tried to live outside the Constitution ot this laud when we didn't agree with.it and it won't work." Supporters of the "bill said constitutional guarantees were not at issue. "I've hoard so much about constitutional rights I begin to said Stewart. "We can run.it into the ground, this talk about constitutional rights." "The police juries of this stale have the right to regulate load limits on bridges and the hours a bar stays said Sen. B. H. Hayburn of Bogaliisa. "All this is going to do is allow police juries to issue permits to say what is going to go on." Rayburn won approval of an amendment to 'force festival promoters to turn over half of their piwceds for menially re- larded children if the festival is held without a permit. Israelis Press Guerrilla Troops Cross Into Lebanon Again Kentucky School Goes Year 'Round COLLAPSED BRIDGE An unidentified man Monday. More than tons, of concrete, was crushed tp death as he drove his .pickup poured last Thursday, fell when supports col- truck beneath this freeway bridge under con-" lapsed. (AP "Wirepholo) struction at Baldwin of Los Angeles________ Concrete Ramp Crushes Driver BALDWIN PARK, Highway crews say bulldozers and dump .trucks will probably work through Wednesday clearing away six million pounds of rubble left when a freeway, offramp bridge collapsed Monday, killing a motorist. The bridge, rot open lo traffic, fell'onlo an underpass. transition road, trapping the motorist and his 1955 pickup truck underneath. The victim, Ray B. Dooley, 67, San Limas, Calif., died under eight feet of concrete slabs and steel girders, officials reported. Highway officials said the offramp bridge was 12i feet long and cost Commulcr traffic normally jams Ihe transition road. Although the concrete bridge-caved in. during morning rush hour, only the one truck. was underneath. The scene was 10 miles east .of Los" Angeles at the connection of the San Bernardino Freeway .with the San Gabriel River Freeway. Cause of the collapse was not known. The offramp had not been opened to traffic. Its concrete was poured last Thursday and had. not finished the curing process, officials said. LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) From now on, the kids in Jefferson County may go to school all year if they want to. Or, if .they prefer lo lake the traditional vacation, they may have it in summer, autumn, winter or sprung. A decision to scrap.Ihe nine- month school year and conduct 'classes for" all 12 grades on a four-quarter, year-round basis was made by the Board of Edu- cation Monday night. The objective is to save mon- ey in school building construc- tion cosls and make better use of educational personnel. School officials aren't predict- ing how many students will opt to attend the summer term. The normal summer school enroll- ment is Mrs. Roberta fully, the school board president, said it as many as students choose to at- tend the summer term rather lhan another, the system initial- ly would save approximately million in new construction needed lo meet projected popu- lation growth. The program is expecled lo be In operation by September 1971 if a grant is forlhcom-. ing from the U.S. Office of Edu- cation. Without the grant, the school system will move into the new plan over a period of sever- al years. Mrs. Tully said Ihe year- round school concept has re- Market Prices Head Downward NEW YORK (AP) Stock market prices headed down- ward in very active trading to- day. The Dow Jones average had slipped 4.17 points to 637.19 by a.m., one half hour after the opening bell. The tape was running two minutes lalo on the New York paced advances by a 5-2 margin on the exchange. Analysts said they saw no de- velopments which could stave off further erosion of the mar- ket. ceived a- favorable public re- sponse. "I think this is Ihe coming thing" in urban she said. Supl. Richard' Van -'Moose predicted the concept ultimately would become the accepted plan in school systems across the na- tion. Mrs. Tiilly said before making its unanimous decision the board -studied the results ot year-round plans already work- ing in the Atlanta and Fulton school systems in grades 8-12. iwslix Amusemcnls......... 4A Bridge................4A Business News 6A Classified.......... 7-1 OB Comics............. 5B Editorials.......'.......6B' I loroscope.............3A Hospilal Patients....... 10B Obituaries 4B Spofls 8.9A This Man's Art......'. 4 A To Your Good Health____3A TV tog.............. I OB Women's News........ 3B By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Israeli troops again crossed inlo today in a patrol- ling action against Arab guerril- las who have been attacking Is- raeli settlements on this lense frontier. Maj. Gen. Mordechai Gur, the northern area commander of Is- raeli forces, told newsmen that Ihe patrols were working at his discretion in-order to keep the guerrillas away from Ihe bor- der. 'As the general talked to news- men, !wo patrols operating in Lebanese the cen- tral sector of the 50-mile border. One was patrolling the heights of Ml. Avivim, opposite the set- tlement of Malkiyya. The eleva- tion overlooks several Israeli villages. Newsmen could see soldiers standing at the lop of the hill. The second patrol was operat- ing near Aitroun, opposite the Israeli town of Avivim. It was near there that Arab guerrillas Friday ambushed an Israeli schoolbus and killed 12 persons, most of them children. Gur said the palrols were small and no tanks were in- volved. Tanks were parked.on the Israeli side of the border, ready lo go into action if need- ed. Correspondents in the area, however, said they saw four tanks rumble into Lebanon this morning accompanied by Iwo units of between 10 and 15 sol- diers. The Israelis Monday sent four tanks into Lebanon Llong with about 28 soldiers in the first an- nounced police action since the school bus ambush. The Lebanese said one of their officers was killed in lion- day's fighting at Marwahein, a Jew hundred yards from the border and 10 miles inland from Ihe Mediterranean. Israeli cas- ualties were not mentioned. More farmers fled from south- ern Lebanon, bringing (he total of refugees from the south to according lo reports in Beirut newspapers. Government officials put Ihe figure at Lebanese religious leaders called a general strike, accusing the Beirut government of negli- gence in protecting the soulh, and the strike appeared nearly 100 per cent effective in the cap- ital. All shops were closed; dockworkers stood idle at the piers; municipal buses were not running; many large trading concerns did not open; newspa- pers did not publish; and'all schools were closed. Lebanon has been waiting nervously for more major Israe- li moves in retaliation for ihe Arab guerrilla atlack on an Is- raeli school bus last Friday. Twelve persons, mostly chil- dren, were killed in Ihe atlack. Shortly after the morlar and rocket attack, Israeli artillery shelled four Lebanese border villages in reprisal, killing 20 Lebanese and wounding 40. Funnels Menace Lubbock Again, But Remain Aloft By THK ASSOCIATED PRESS Lubbock residents, slill shaken by the death and destruction of a May 11 tornado, sought shel- ter as funnel clouds whirled menacingly close again Monday night but chose to stay aloft. The latest round of twisters crapped up across the slate line in Southeastern New Mexico and spun toward the northeast over a broad reach of Northwest Tex- as in thunderstorms laden with hail and briefly violent rains. Appearance of the writhing' tornadoes spread alarm as far north as Amarillo, also causing Weather Bureau warnings be- tween that point and lAibbock. The turbulent weather devel- oped while Lubbock was still re- covering from the effects of the nighttime twister which fatally injured 26 didn't die until last inflicted million in property losses. Some people hunied into storm cellars or basements in Lubbpck. Others hpaded into the downtown district for shelter in hrgc buildings. Nearly all remained indoors if no oilier ref- uge stood close by. First reports of tornado sight- ings came from Southeastern New Mexico, one wrilhcd over open country 20 miles east- southeast of Roswoll, another whirled through the sky 30 miles northwest of Lovington and a third was spotted by radar near Caprock. As fierce thunderstorms boiled into Texas, a funnel cloud was tracked nearly 10 miles from near Shallowater to just north of the Lubbock airport about 6 p.m. Spectators spotted the next one from just oulside the southwest edge of Lubbock over western sections of Ihe city shortly be- fore 7 p.m., and police reported still another two miles west of town at p.m. By B p.m. Ihe Weather Bureau relayed word of a twislcr west of Tulia, and by p.m. that one or another was spotted ID miles south of Canyon. Amarillo was added to the warned area as a tornado was retried over the soulhwcsl part of Ihe cily at p.m. Hailstones up to' the size of marbles pounded the Khallo- water vicinity and a rural area Hz miles west of Abernalhy, and hail about the size of peas pep- pered the counlryside southwest of Amarillo. Areas in Abilene Get Over an Inch Hain fell mainly on the plains and everywhere else in Abilene and the surrounding area Monday night. And there, is more to come, according to the weather bureau, which is giving a 30 per cent chance of rain this after- noon, 80 per cent chance tonight and 30 per cent Wednesday. Severe weather warnings for Ihe area are a possibility, said Ihe weatherman, depending on developments. Twenty four counties in West Texas were placed under a Ihunderslorm watch Monday night. Abilene got an official .66-inch of rain Ins! night and this morning pushing the yearly tolal to 9.29. One local gauge showed 1.20. Several places in Ihe area caughl nearly an Inch of r.iln, Hawlcy, Sylvcsler and Tuscola had .90-inch. Tuscola resi- dents were also treated lo a vicious show of lightening and Ihuralcr, according to one ob- server. Kweclwatcr measured an inch even. WHERE iil Any Land Still for Homesteading? By ELLIE FL'CKER and BETTY GHIS50M Q. Is land sjlll available under the Homestead Act? If so, In what slates arc these lands available? A. Homesteading is almost a thing of the past. The Bureau of Land Management says Ihe risks In homesteading are high and chances for success are slim because all available public domain land is in western stales where farming success depends on irrigation water. The cost.of getting.righls (o underground water and sinking a well are. high and your investment in time and money would probably run more than Ihe cost of a farm purchased on Ihe open market. There's land available no list of "homestead" land; you must find it yourself and file an application for it with the Bureau of Land Management. Q. I've heard from lols of people that Merchants Motor Lines Is planning on making some of (heir main terminals Into commissioned agents. Please check Into this and let me know: I tave a deep Interest In this company. A. Merchants is not planning such a or in Ihe future. Bui Ihey do have commissioned agents in many areas and if you're interested in becoming one contact Merchants' management; they'd be happy to talk lo you. Q. I'd like to know how and when they started Mother's Day. In what slate and what year? Where Is the person now who started It? A. Years ago they celebrated "Mothering Sui-day" in England, but Julia Ward Howe inlroducod the idea of Mother's Day in the U.S. in 1872. It was a day dedicated (o peace and was first celebrated in Boslon on June 2. Julia Howe died in 1910. Anna Jarvis from Graflon, W. Va., Is gen- erally recognized as the founder of Mother's Day. She was responsible'for its nationwide observance, began the custom of wearing a carnation on lhat day, and selected the second Sunday in May for its observance. She died in 1848. In 1915 Presidcnl Woodrow Wilson proclaimed Mother's Day an annual national observance. Q. Several days ago on the police beat, girl was molested anil that the mother knew about It and knew who did It, hut would not file a complaint. My questions: Arc they going to do anything lo this person? Is anything being done In regard to this? A. A complaint was filed by relatives of the child and Ihe case is not closed, but police are short of evidence lo prove there was a violation and are wailing lo sec if It was announced that a two year old anything else develops. Q. I read In the May 15 morning paper about service cuts being made at Ihr. Tost Office. Postmaster Grant. said tbese are being cil bul.ler more ef- ficient service. he mean more ef- ficient service on Saturdays when there Mill be none? If this docs the Irlck why not cut out all services on Monday, Wed- nesday and Friday and REALLY have efficient service'.'? A. It doesn't make much sense, docs it? What he really meant was more efficient utilization of post office employes; not more efficient service for us. Grant said they've had fewer customers on Saturday, yet had lo use the same number of workers lo handle them and since their budget is in the red, the Saturday- closing will help cut expenses, lie said this step is being taken nationwide. Incidentally, only the Main Branch anil the Barrow St. Branch will close on Saturdays; all 12 contact stations will remain open. 30, Abilene, Texas, 73C04. Names will not Address questions lo Action Line, Box he used hut questions must be signed and addresses given. Please licludc telephone numbers if possible. AGILENE Municipal Airport Total for Year Normal fnr Year MI7 Meadowbrook 1026 Cedar ANSON BAIIID COLORADO CITY KASTLAND HASKEU, IIAWLEY HERMLEIGH KiN'OX CITY LAWN PAINT ROCK HOTAM SNYDKH STAMFORD SWKETWATKR SYLVESTER TUSCOLA WINTERS Total .66 9.29 9.19 1.20 .M .40 .13 .25 Tr. .02 .90 .10 Tr. .37 .35 .10 .20 .14 Tr. l.CO .M .90 .03 Tr. WEATHER U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE WEATHER BUREAU (WeJtlur Mtp, Pg. lift) ABILENE AMD VICINITY rediuj] Picily cloudy and warm today, to.-Cflhl and Wednesday. CMncei Iw Kaifcred Ift under ihowerg ifl Mr cent this eCernocn, 10 err cent IcnioM and 30 per ccnl Wedneidav. highs bain Tuejday ard Wsdrwjdsy afternoon nur K. near W. and for U-hauri ending at 9 a.m.: 67 65, Hlojl and ftw for lime wrtod lait year: W and U. SL-niet laU fifth) i wrvlu today) tumel tonight:   

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